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The Unrelenting Race Gap in Healthcare - The Atlantic

The Unrelenting Race Gap in Healthcare - The Atlantic | Health Care MBA topics | Scoop.it
New studies show just how seriously racial disparities continue to manifest in health care—and what can be done
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Apple's iOS 8 health app can track your coffee intake

Apple's iOS 8 health app can track your coffee intake | Health Care MBA topics | Scoop.it
Apple is showing it means business in optimizing its mobile devices for health and fitness by adding step-counting and caffeine tracking to its upcoming iOS 8 health app, an enthusiast site reported.
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Case study: Big data improves cardiology diagnoses by 17%

Case study: Big data improves cardiology diagnoses by 17% | Health Care MBA topics | Scoop.it

Big data analytics technology has been able to find patterns and pinpoint disease states more accurately than even the most highly-trained physicians.

 

The human brain may be nature’s finest computer, but artificial intelligences fed on big data are making a convincing challenge for the crown. In the realm of healthcare, natural language processing, associative intelligence, and machine learning are revolutionizing the way physicians make decisions and diagnose complex patients, significantly improving accuracy and catching deadly issues before symptoms even present themselves.

 

In this case study examining the impact of big data analytics on clinical decision making, Dr. Partho Sengupta, Director of Cardiac Ultrasound Research and Associate Professor of Medicine in Cardiology at the Mount Sinai Hospital, has used an associative memory engine from Saffron Technology to crunch enormous datasets for more accurate diagnoses.

 

Using 10,000 attributes collected from 90 metrics in six different locations of the heart, all produced by a single, one-second heartbeat, the analytics technology has been able to find patterns and pinpoint disease states more quickly and accurately than even the most highly-trained physicians.

 

more at http://healthitanalytics.com/2014/07/07/case-study-big-data-improves-cardiology-diagnoses-by-17/

 


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Union Budget 2014-15: What healthcare start-ups and entrepreneurs want - TheHealthSite

Union Budget 2014-15: What healthcare start-ups and entrepreneurs want - TheHealthSite | Health Care MBA topics | Scoop.it
TheHealthSite Union Budget 2014-15: What healthcare start-ups and entrepreneurs want TheHealthSite healthcare With the Union Budget for the year of 2014-15 being brought out today, a large number of healthcare companies are hoping for some kind of...
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Vegetarian Health Institute - Discover How to Thrive on a Plant Based Diet and Stop Being Vulnerable to Deficiencies

Vegetarian Health Institute - Discover How to Thrive on a Plant Based Diet and Stop Being Vulnerable to Deficiencies | Health Care MBA topics | Scoop.it
“ Vegetarian / Vegan Mastery Program - developed by Trevor Levine, Michael Klaper, M.D., and several respected authors. A series of 50 weekly lessons that teach you to thrive on a plant based diet. Learn to avoid pitfalls like anemia, diabetes, dental problems, or osteoporosis.”
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Understanding Cheating in Online Courses - CUW Online Learning

Understanding Cheating in Online Courses - CUW Online Learning | Health Care MBA topics | Scoop.it
“Live Events, Twitter Feeds, Chat Rooms, and other resources for the Understanding Cheating in Online Courses MOOC (Massively Open Online Course)”
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, June 10, 2014 1:52 AM

Clever Mooc Style open course on cheating in the online environment. All course modules are open and available to you. 


The hastag for this course is #cheatmooc .  Clever, and provocative; can you cheat your way through a mooc? Why would you? What would be gained?  Lots to think about here.

Maryalice Leister's curator insight, June 13, 2014 7:35 AM

Cheating in online coursework remains a hot topic. Take another look at the issue here.

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Copyright Flowchart: Can I Use It? Yes? No? If This... Then...

Copyright Flowchart: Can I Use It? Yes? No? If This... Then... | Health Care MBA topics | Scoop.it
“ It is the responsibility of all educators to model good digital citizenship for their students. Especially when it comes to copyright, plagiarism and intellectual property. The waters are murky. No...”
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Library Staff's curator insight, June 12, 2014 10:46 PM

Thank you Silvia. Well said. It's not just students who think anything on the net is there for the taking. I use my own media as much as possible, or Creative Commons images, but even with my knowledge it's a steep learning curve. Awareness is the first step.

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New guidelines to improve healthcare's 'horrendous' supply chain record

New guidelines to improve healthcare's 'horrendous' supply chain record | Health Care MBA topics | Scoop.it
British Medical Association has released new guidance for GPs and commissioners, striving to protect workers' rights in medical supply chains. However, the guidance highlights the lack of progress since 2008 when the last guidelines were released, including shocking conditions in manufacture of products such as surgical instruments. There are calls for the NHS to incorporate a statement on ethical procurement into its constitution, and implement sustainable procurement approaches already established by private companies.
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Many Health Policy Researchers Are Skeptical of Social Media such as Tweeting, Blogging, Facebook

Many Health Policy Researchers Are Skeptical of Social Media such as Tweeting, Blogging, Facebook | Health Care MBA topics | Scoop.it
Study suggests that many lack confidence in social media for communication, resulting in missed opportunity to publicize workThough Twitter boats 645 million users across the world, only 14 percent of health policy researchers reported using Twitter—and approximately 20 percent used blogs and Facebook – to communicate their research findings over the past year, according to a new study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. In contrast, sixty-five percent used traditional media channels, such as press releases or media interviews. While participants believed that social media can be an effective way to communicate research findings, many lacked the confidence to use it and felt their academic peers and institutions did not value it or respect it as much as traditional media and direct contact with policy makers. However, the authors note that when used effectively, social media channels could present a major opportunity for connecting with both policy makers and the general public.Full results of the study, one of the first of its kind, are published online today in the journal Health Affairs, and will be presented as a plenary session during this weekend's annual AcademyHealth conference in San Diego.The study, a survey of 215 health and health-policy researchers (primarily M.D.s and Ph.D.s), comes as academic journals, public health agencies, and health care organizations increasingly use social mediato communicate health-related information. It also comes at a time when the nation is embarking on major changes to the health care system—when health policy research evidence is increasingly important.“Most health policy researchers are not using social media to communicate their research results, which could be a significant missed opportunity to expose a larger audience to important health news and findings,” said lead author, David Grande, M.D., MPA, assistant professor of Medicine at Penn Medicine, in a prepared statement.Results of the study also reveal that researchers worry about how their peers and home institutions perceive social media, and that many describe it as replete with opinion and “junk” and are concerned about presenting their scientific results in such settings. However, Grande notes that participants became more confident about social media when given examples of how the channels could be used effectively. For example, many thought that they could not communicate anything beyond the 140-character limit on Twitter, despite the common practice of including links to more substantive content. Understanding how to use these tools, the authors say, could alleviate concerns about the information being superficially presented.Finally, the study shows that junior faculty members are more positively predisposed than their senior colleagues about social media. This, Grande says, could be a result of greater familiarity with it from other aspects of their lives, or it might be because senior faculty members have greater access to policy makers owing to their stature and reputation. Regardless, the authors suggest there are considerable benefits to using the tools for research dissemination.
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Dr Martin Wale's curator insight, June 24, 2014 11:47 AM

Somewhat simplistic take on a complex issue.  Early research results will sometimes be simply wrong, hence the importance of writing methods up in sufficient detail for a study to be replicated and hopefully found reproducible.  This essential process could be much more difficult if early research has already had significant public exposure.  There are, however, social networks for specific audiences, although I'm not aware of a good example in research.   

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How generations of doctors will handle health care change

How generations of doctors will handle health care change | Health Care MBA topics | Scoop.it
... most successful millennials even be doctors? A growing number of newly trained millennial physicians are skipping clinical medicine entirely and taking their ideas directly to market as health care technology entrepreneurs.
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InDemand Interpreting raises $8.8M to close the language gap in ...

InDemand Interpreting raises $8.8M to close the language gap in ... | Health Care MBA topics | Scoop.it
“Our vision is that every patient should receive the highest quality healthcare, regardless of language, cultural background or disability,” CEO Jim Ewel said in a statement. “We're very ...
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Finland can lead the way in health technology, declares GE Healthcare executive - Helsinki Times

Finland can lead the way in health technology, declares GE Healthcare executive - Helsinki Times | Health Care MBA topics | Scoop.it
Helsinki Times
Finland can lead the way in health technology, declares GE Healthcare executive
Helsinki Times
The start-up has developed a software-based service that enables doctors at health care centres to seek consultation with specialists.
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Meet The Newest Member Of Your Personal Healthcare Team - Forbes

Meet The Newest Member Of Your Personal Healthcare Team - Forbes | Health Care MBA topics | Scoop.it
Forbes
Meet The Newest Member Of Your Personal Healthcare Team
Forbes
As most patients in the American healthcare system know, it's gotten harder and harder to maintain regular, detailed communication with your doctor.
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How Doctors Improve Health Via 'Disruptive Technology'

How Doctors Improve Health Via 'Disruptive Technology' | Health Care MBA topics | Scoop.it
From electronic health records and telemedicine to "internet-driven physical therapy," Dr. Richard Rothman, founder of the Rothman Institute, says providers of medical care are embracing the promise of the digital age.

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Who Stands to Benefit When Health Care Wearables Are Everywhere? - Motley Fool

Who Stands to Benefit When Health Care Wearables Are Everywhere?
Motley Fool
Most importantly for the health care industry, wearable health care technology lowers hospital costs.
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Elsevier Launches Policy Knowledge Management Tool for Healthcare ... - MarketWatch

Elsevier Launches Policy Knowledge Management Tool for Healthcare ... - MarketWatch | Health Care MBA topics | Scoop.it
Elsevier Launches Policy Knowledge Management Tool for Healthcare ...
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Intermountain researchers develop smartphone-based lab test for stress

Intermountain researchers develop smartphone-based lab test for stress | Health Care MBA topics | Scoop.it

Researchers from Intermountain Healthcare have developed a smartphone-based test for measuring salivary cortisol, which can help care providers understand the patient’s stress levels. The test can be performed at the point of care in just five minutes.

 

When someone feels stress, their body’s natural response is to release hormones, including adrenaline and cortisol, to help them deal with the “threat”. When cortisol is released, it increases glucose in the system, but also curbs nonessential functions including the digestive system, the reproductive system and growth processes.

 

When people feel stress throughout the day, thus releasing too much cortisol, it can lead to anxiety, depression, digestive problems, heart disease, sleep problems, weight gain, and memory and concentration impairment.

 

To perform the test, care providers use a smartphone’s camera to take a picture using the flash. From there, the image analysis app can identify the user’s cortisol levels. 

 

“When cortisol levels are overlooked too many people suffer and die because of excess or insufficient cortisol,” lead researcher and Intermountain Medical Center Director of Diabetes and Endocrinology Dr. Joel Ehrenkranz said in a statement.

 

Ehrenkranz also believes this test will be especially helpful for people with diabetes.

 

more at http://mobihealthnews.com/34753/intermountain-researchers-develop-smartphone-based-lab-test-for-stress/

 

 


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New guidelines to improve healthcare's 'horrendous' supply chain record

New guidelines to improve healthcare's 'horrendous' supply chain record | Health Care MBA topics | Scoop.it
British Medical Association has released new guidance for GPs and commissioners, striving to protect workers' rights in medical supply chains. However, the guidance highlights the lack of progress since 2008 when the last guidelines were released, including shocking conditions in manufacture of products such as surgical instruments. There are calls for the NHS to incorporate a statement on ethical procurement into its constitution, and implement sustainable procurement approaches already established by private companies.
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Understanding Cheating in Online Courses - CUW Online Learning

Understanding Cheating in Online Courses - CUW Online Learning | Health Care MBA topics | Scoop.it
“Live Events, Twitter Feeds, Chat Rooms, and other resources for the Understanding Cheating in Online Courses MOOC (Massively Open Online Course)”
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, June 10, 2014 1:52 AM

Clever Mooc Style open course on cheating in the online environment. All course modules are open and available to you. 


The hastag for this course is #cheatmooc .  Clever, and provocative; can you cheat your way through a mooc? Why would you? What would be gained?  Lots to think about here.

Maryalice Leister's curator insight, June 13, 2014 7:35 AM

Cheating in online coursework remains a hot topic. Take another look at the issue here.

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New guidelines to improve healthcare's 'horrendous' supply chain record

New guidelines to improve healthcare's 'horrendous' supply chain record | Health Care MBA topics | Scoop.it
British Medical Association has released new guidance for GPs and commissioners, striving to protect workers' rights in medical supply chains. However, the guidance highlights the lack of progress since 2008 when the last guidelines were released, including shocking conditions in manufacture of products such as surgical instruments. There are calls for the NHS to incorporate a statement on ethical procurement into its constitution, and implement sustainable procurement approaches already established by private companies.
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Five Ways to Attract New Patients to Your Medical Practice

Five Ways to Attract New Patients to Your Medical Practice | Health Care MBA topics | Scoop.it
Bringing new patients through the door of your medical practice is a perennial concern for most physicians. Building visibility and relationships is key, but physicians do not need a huge advertising budget to reach out to new patients.Here are five surprisingly simple ways to be proactive about building your practice.1. Think about branding.Like any business, your practice needs a strong, clear brand. Brands build trust, comfort, and loyalty, which are three qualities every medical practice wants for its patients. You can discover your brand message by asking yourself a few questions: What makes you stand out from the competition? Who is your ideal patient? What are your service goals? Once you’ve established your brand identity, aim for consistency across the board: your stationery, your website, your appointment reminder cards, your signage, and even your personalized medical pad should be clearly branded with your name and logo.2. Nurture your current patients.If your existing patients are happy, they will tell their friends and family, and your practice will grow exponentially. Complacency is your enemy. Don’t take it for granted that patients are satisfied — ask them directly. Everyone loves to give their opinion, and you may uncover surprising information which could transform the patient experience in your practice. Sometimes small, easily overlooked details can make a huge difference.3. Embrace social media.Every doctor knows that word of mouth is the most powerful source of referrals, but what many physicians haven’t realized yet is how many of those conversations are happening online. Establishing a solid, appealing social media presence is an absolute must.According to physician Michael Woo Ming, “It is important for physicians to use social media to gain new patients. Such sites as Facebook, where millions of people are communicating on a daily basis, are an oasis of word-of-mouth referrals. Physicians can tap into that if they are actively using Facebook, or other social media tools.”You can share information about your practice, remind patients of seasonal appointment needs (kindergarten physicals, flu shots, etc.), share health-related articles and video, and present your practice as caring and approachable.Communication is the most important part of your relationship with patients, and engaging with them on social media is a fantastic way to keep those lines open. Outside of the usual channels of Facebook and Twitter, be aware of physician review sites. They carry a lot of weight when people are looking for a new doctor. Encourage your current satisfied patients to post reviews and regularly check your ratings.4. Educate people.The appetite for reliable, relatable information about health issues is inexhaustible, and you can make the most of it. There are many ways to raise your profile by becoming an educational resource. You could answer reader’s health questions in your local paper, or agree to be a medical consultant on your local TV or radio station. You could write a blog about common medical complaints and worries. Patients value your expertise, so don’t be shy.5. Become a caring presence in the community.Giving back to the community is one of the best ways to reach out to potential patients. The need for qualified medical volunteers far outstrips the supply, and your presence is invaluable. Outreach can take many forms: offer to host talks, seminars, and question-and-answer sessions at local schools, active seniors clubs, community centers, and charity events. Host medical support groups for people struggling with new diagnoses or chronic conditions. Make yourself available at community sports events.In addition to providing others with valuable information, it is also a great way of capturing the attention of your community. According to Medical Arts Press, "you can get free exposure for your practice by submitting press releases about newsworthy events such as the addition of a new provider, an award or certification received by a provider or staff member, or the fact that you’ve participated in a meaningful community service event."Handing out informational packets in custom plastic bags with your logo (as mentioned earlier) will remind members of your community who you are and the services you provide. In turn, you’ll gain visibility as an involved, concerned member of the community, make connections, and build a reputation as someone who cares.Marketing is just another way of building your relationships with your patients and your community. Investing time, creativity, and passion into your practice will pay off in numerous ways.. Whether you are well established or just starting out, continually inviting new patients into your office is a vital part of keeping your practice healthy and profitable.- See more at: http://www.physicianspractice.com/blog/five-ways-attract-new-patients-your-medical-practice#sthash.psDNoE7o.dpuf
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Google will reportedly announce "Google Fit," a health data service, later this month | GigaOM Health Tech News

Google will reportedly announce "Google Fit," a health data service, later this month | GigaOM Health Tech News | Health Care MBA topics | Scoop.it
Google will launch a health-based service called “Google Fit” later this month at its annual I/O developers conference, according to an article published in Forbes on Thursday. The service will collect data from a variety of fitness trackers and apps — which sounds a lot like a competitor to HealthKit, the service Apple announced last week at WWDC.According to the report, Google Fit is a framework to aggregate biometric data, and there will be partnerships with wearable device makers announced at I/O. The article quotes an unnamed source who said that Google Fit could use a wearable to measure steps or heart rate. I expect two Android Wear devices to get some stage time at I/O: Motorola’s Moto 360 and the LG G Watch. While it’s unclear whether those devices will end up being the fitness trackers Google announces in conjunction with Google Fit, leaks suggest the LG G Watch will have a pedometer and a touch sensor built in.Click headline to read more--
Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Year-End Roundup, 2013-14 | Math, Science, Health and Technology - New York Times (blog)

Year-End Roundup, 2013-14 | Math, Science, Health and Technology - New York Times (blog) | Health Care MBA topics | Scoop.it
New York Times (blog) Year-End Roundup, 2013-14 | Math, Science, Health and Technology New York Times (blog) This week, we're gathering all the lesson plans we've published this school year so you can find a complete list for each subject area in...
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How Technology Can Transform Our Healthcare Labyrinth - Forbes

How Technology Can Transform Our Healthcare Labyrinth - Forbes | Health Care MBA topics | Scoop.it
Forbes
How Technology Can Transform Our Healthcare Labyrinth
Forbes
We can tackle this stunning waste in healthcare by implementing technology solutions to reduce inefficiencies, redundancies, and administrative costs.
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The new era of mobile health tech has a big gotcha - InfoWorld

The new era of mobile health tech has a big gotcha - InfoWorld | Health Care MBA topics | Scoop.it
The new era of mobile health tech has a big gotcha InfoWorld This week, Samsung unveiled an innovative hardware architecture called Simband for combining health sensors onto a common wristband, and -- more important -- an open API architecure for...
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