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Motorola wants to tattoo a smartphone receiver on your neck

Motorola wants to tattoo a smartphone receiver on your neck | Health Care Industry | Scoop.it

Google-owned smartphone maker Motorola has applied for a patent for an "electronic tattoo" on people's necks that doubles as a mobile microphone, lie detector and digital display.

 

The tattoo would capture vibrations, or sound, directly from a user's throat, thus eliminating background noise that so often mars conversations over mobile phones.

 

The sound would then be transmitted from the electronic tattoo, which has its own power supply built-in, to a nearby smartphone via Bluetooth, near-field communication, also known as NFC, or the wireless technology ZigBee.

 

"Mobile communication devices are often operated in noisy environments ... Communication can reasonably be improved and even enhanced with a method and system for reducing the acoustic noise in such environments and contexts," reads the patent.

 

"The system comprises an electronic skin tattoo capable of being applied to a throat region of a body."

 

According to the patent, the device could also be used as a lie detector by measuring the skin's electrical conductance or "galvanic skin response" – the level at which electric current passes through something. 

"A user that may be nervous or engaging in speaking falsehoods may exhibit different galvanic skin response than a more confident, truth-telling individual," reads the patent.

 

The tattoo could even be fitted with a display and user interface for inputting commands, such as muting the device and joining a group conversation.

 

The device also has the potential to communicate with tablets and other mobile computing devices.

 

The patent, titled ''Coupling an electronic skin tattoo to a mobile communication device'' was filed in May 2012, and was published on Thursday in the US.

 

The neck tattoo is by no means the first foray into creative uses of technology for Motorola, which was bought by Google for $12 billion in 2011.

 

The company revealed its work with digital tattoos and password pills in May this year, and just last week Motorola unveiled Project Ara – a modular smartphone users can build and add to themselves.

It has focused on a new wearable tech unit since July, according to TechCrunch, while its parent company is hard at work on Google Glass, and is rumoured to be releasing a smart watch next year.

 

more at: http://www.theage.com.au/digital-life/mobiles/motorola-wants-to-tattoo-a-smartphone-receiver-on-your-neck-20131108-2x5ae.html


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sylvie Royant-Parola's curator insight, November 9, 2013 8:59 AM

De plus en plus inquiétant...!

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Neurocam wearable camera reads your brainwaves and records what interests you

Neurocam wearable camera reads your brainwaves and records what interests you | Health Care Industry | Scoop.it

The neurocam is the world's first wearable camera system that automatically records what interests you.

 

It consists of a headset with a brain-wave sensor and connects to an iPhone. The system estimates whether you're interested in something from the brain-waves captured by the sensor, and uses the iPhone's camera to record the scenes that appear to interest you.

 

Just buy wearing the neurocam, the scenes you have shown an interest in are recorded automatically, and are added to an album which you can look through later.

 

"Right now, the iPhone's camera is ready to record what's in my line of sight through a prism. The iPhone shows what the camera has captured, so it feels as if it's reading my mind. My brain-waves are analyzed by an iPhone app, which quantifies my level of interest on a scale from 0 to 100. If the level exceeds 60, the number turns red, and the camera starts to record automatically, producing a 5-second GIF animation."

 

"We're using the iPhone so that analysis and capture can be done with one device. But this is still a concept model. So, we think there are lots of possibilities, such as turning this into a wearable camera."

 

 

The neurocam arose from the neurowear project, which is involved with items that use brain-waves and bio-sensors, like necomimi, which works using brain-waves. The algorithm for quantifying brain-waves was co-developed with Associate Professor Mitsukura at Keio University.

 

In the future, the project team aims to create an emotional interface, which could link a range of devices and services to people's individual thoughts and feelings.

 

"Because this system is hands-free, we think it could capture a life log, which would be different from deliberately pressing a shutter to capture things you like. As an application in a B2B environment, neurocam could determine what goods in stores interest people. And because the information includes position data, you can do mapping, so it could also show what places people are interested in as an aid for urban development planning. We think it could be used in lots of ways like that."

 scooped from: http://www.diginfo.tv/v/13-0083-r-en.php


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How new technologies and innovations are transforming heath care

How new technologies and innovations are transforming heath care | Health Care Industry | Scoop.it
At AHIP’s Operations and Technology Forum, November 18-20 in Chicago, learn more about the evolving needs of the health insurance industry.

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Sorenson Anja's curator insight, October 17, 2013 10:51 PM

It talks more about the evolving needs of the health insurance industry in keynote and concurrent sessions. As the years go by, our technology grows widely.

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EHRs have both positive, negative effect on physician satisfaction

EHRs have both positive, negative effect on physician satisfaction | Health Care Industry | Scoop.it

There's a love/hate relationship between physicians and electronic health records, according to a study of physician satisfaction by RAND Health.

 

In data gathered from 30 physician practices in six states, docs reported EHRs had both positive and negative effects on their satisfaction. For instance, while physicians like being able to remotely access patient information and cite improvements in quality of care attributable to EHR technology, many also said they are frustrated with issues including poor usability, time-consuming data entry, less time for face-to-face patient care and degradation of clinical documentation by trying to force it into structured fields.

 

Physicians also pointed out problems with information overload, as having more EHR functions--such as reminders, alerts, and messaging capabilities--was associated with lower professional satisfaction, according to the researchers.

 

Additionally, for some, EHRs were more expensive than expected, threatening the financial sustainability of their practices.

 

Still, primary care physicians, in particular, described how EHRs improved their ability to provide guideline-based care and track patients' markers of disease control over time.

 

In larger practices, doctors mentioned how having everyone on the same EHR system improved between-provider communication.

 


For More: 
http://www.fierceemr.com/story/ehrs-have-both-positive-negative-effect-physician-satisfaction/2013-10-09


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Motorola wants to tattoo a smartphone receiver on your neck

Motorola wants to tattoo a smartphone receiver on your neck | Health Care Industry | Scoop.it

Google-owned smartphone maker Motorola has applied for a patent for an "electronic tattoo" on people's necks that doubles as a mobile microphone, lie detector and digital display.

 

The tattoo would capture vibrations, or sound, directly from a user's throat, thus eliminating background noise that so often mars conversations over mobile phones.

 

The sound would then be transmitted from the electronic tattoo, which has its own power supply built-in, to a nearby smartphone via Bluetooth, near-field communication, also known as NFC, or the wireless technology ZigBee.

 

"Mobile communication devices are often operated in noisy environments ... Communication can reasonably be improved and even enhanced with a method and system for reducing the acoustic noise in such environments and contexts," reads the patent.

 

"The system comprises an electronic skin tattoo capable of being applied to a throat region of a body."

 

According to the patent, the device could also be used as a lie detector by measuring the skin's electrical conductance or "galvanic skin response" – the level at which electric current passes through something. 

"A user that may be nervous or engaging in speaking falsehoods may exhibit different galvanic skin response than a more confident, truth-telling individual," reads the patent.

 

The tattoo could even be fitted with a display and user interface for inputting commands, such as muting the device and joining a group conversation.

 

The device also has the potential to communicate with tablets and other mobile computing devices.

 

The patent, titled ''Coupling an electronic skin tattoo to a mobile communication device'' was filed in May 2012, and was published on Thursday in the US.

 

The neck tattoo is by no means the first foray into creative uses of technology for Motorola, which was bought by Google for $12 billion in 2011.

 

The company revealed its work with digital tattoos and password pills in May this year, and just last week Motorola unveiled Project Ara – a modular smartphone users can build and add to themselves.

It has focused on a new wearable tech unit since July, according to TechCrunch, while its parent company is hard at work on Google Glass, and is rumoured to be releasing a smart watch next year.

 

more at: http://www.theage.com.au/digital-life/mobiles/motorola-wants-to-tattoo-a-smartphone-receiver-on-your-neck-20131108-2x5ae.html


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sylvie Royant-Parola's curator insight, November 9, 2013 8:59 AM

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An App That Saved 10,000 Lives

An App That Saved 10,000 Lives | Health Care Industry | Scoop.it
Start-ups are increasingly looking to the principles of behavioral psychology to encourage behaviors and return visits. And those principles have helped HealthTap increase the number of users and doctors on the site.

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Smartphones vs. Doctors: Who Knows More about Your Health Data?

Smartphones vs. Doctors: Who Knows More about Your Health Data? | Health Care Industry | Scoop.it

As more people use smartphones, laptops and wearable computers to track their daily wellness, the resulting deluge of personal health data threatens to overwhelm doctors. The surge of data driven by thequantified self trend has put more detailed health records on many people’s mobile phones than what appears on a doctor’s chart, according to a University of Washington researcher.


“One doctor told us, ‘I know how to manage three blood pressure readings taken in my clinic, but I don’t know how to manage 10,000 readings taken at a person’s home,” said Gina Neff, an associate professor who runs the Project on Communication Technology and Organizational Practices at UW.

 

 

Not only is there more healthcare data, but groups view it in fundamentally different ways. Doctors value data that can help them make clinical decisions while patients tend to think of data as narrative. Then there are healthcare researchers that seek variants across groups rather than focusing on individuals. According to Neff, the result is a big disconnect between the three groups.

 

“These different kinds of expectations mean that people act and do things with data, make decisions about data that really don’t fit with all the other folks who they need to be connecting with around that data,” she said.

 

Physicians and health care researchers will struggle to use healthcare data until there’s a protocol or system to exchange the information, according to Neff. She believes that in the near term an understanding of the real and perceived value of patient-generated data could lead to new communication channels between doctor, patient and health researchers.

 

“My doctor may not even want the data from my mobile phone that tells me about my health, but I can use that data to start a conversation with my doctor and that may be one of the most important ways we create social interoperability around these kinds of data.”

  
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Wearables will soon analyze your body chemistry to make you healthier

Wearables will soon analyze your body chemistry to make you healthier | Health Care Industry | Scoop.it

A lot of the focus in wearable computing has been on delivering products that help everyday users monitor some of the more basic activity traits, such as steps taken and heart rate. While these are certainly useful metrics for health monitoring, they do not paint the full picture.

 

Computational biologists instead study the chemical changes that occur in people’s bodies with the help of optical sensors, non-invasive devices that use the red-to-near-infrared spectral region to assess the chemical changes that occur in the user’s blood vessels, among other places.

 

By leveraging this cutting-edge technology and wearable computing, we are equipped to understand the changes that occur in a person’s body at a whole new level. The implications of this change span from improved training of athletes to better management of chronic diseases and healthcare.

 

 Some interesting recent cases in research that show the potential for disruption include:

 

Researchers at the National Technical University of Athens have helped individuals self-manage diabetes by stimulating the function of an artificial pancreas with fully embedded wearable systems. A paper in the Journal of Biomechanics shows promising results for wearables in athletic training. Scientists mapped out the physiology of athletes’ ski-jumps in order to determine the biological constraints of each individual’s approach. By comparing data across 22 different skiiers, the scientists were able to determine that the wearable system was a very promising tool for training that captured information beyond the capacity of a traditional camera.Researchers at Texas A&M University are investigating the use of optical sensors to interact with dermally-implanted microparticle sensors. This technology could enable cost cutting and continuous blood chemistry monitoring.Optical sensors used to monitor both athletic performance and overall health by researchers at the Dublin Institute of Technology. The sophisticated sensors interpret user’s sweat particles in order to deduce what is going on at a biological level. One of the sensors measured pH levels of sweat particles in order to deduce dehydration while athletes were running. This is a huge stride for activity tracking because it represents real time monitoring of athletic performance and biological signals


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Sue Gould's curator insight, October 11, 2013 1:43 AM

Wearable computers are here.  

Dan Baxter's curator insight, October 12, 2013 11:20 AM

The next step for quantified and teleheath sensors