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[Official] Enzo Natural Matcha Green Tea

Take the morning away from from that same old gourmet coffee grind and try some of Enzo's Organic Matcha Green Tea Powder! http://bit.ly/official-enzo


​Enzo is a small, customer oriented company with a goal to bring our one of a kind items to the world. Our powder is manufactured out of the highest quality, organic and natural green tea. Try out adding it to your preferred cookie dishes and you'll be pleased with a refreshing green tea flavor. Our tasty green tea has tons of Anti-oxidants, provides a healthful energy increase and likes great! Why drink gourmet coffee when our matcha may bring you numerous more rewards! You can even bake it in your favorite cakes !
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DJ Soda tung MV gợi cảm cho bản remix má»i ca khúc "Hotline Bling"

DJë ìë¤ Nonstop New 2016 Dance Remix - Dj Soda #2

DJ Soda - nữ DJ nóng bá»ng ngÆ°á»i HÃ*n Quá»c bất ngá» tung MV ngắn gợi cảm cho bản remix hit "Hotline Bling" do chÃ*nh cô sản xuất.
Nữ DJ nóng bá»ng ngÆ°á»i HÃ*n Quá»c - Soda vừa tung MV cho sản phẩm remix Äầu tay của cô. Bản remix cho hit "Hotline Bling" của Drake lÃ* sá»± hợp tác giữa Soda cùng rapper Äá»ng hÆ°Æ¡ng Simo. MV vá»i hình ảnh vừa dá» thÆ°Æ¡ng vừa gợi cảm của DJ Soda vá»i phần nhạc có giai Äiá»u nhÃ* nhảnh vÃ* phần lá»i Äược thay bằng lá»i rap của Simo hiá»n Äang gây sá»t trên mạng Internet.



Soda (Hwang Sohee) lÃ* nữ DJ ngÆ°á»i HÃ*n Quá»c vá»i ngoại hình xinh xắn vÃ* khả nÄng chÆ¡i nhạc khá á»n. DJ Soda thÆ°á»ng xuyên biá»u diá»n trong các club lá»n tại Seoul nhÆ°ng sá»± nghiá»p của cô thá»±c sá»± phất lên nhÆ° diá»u gặp gió sau khi Äoạn clip cô vừa chÆ¡i DJ vừa nhÃ* nhảnh nhảy theo vÅ© Äạo ca khúc "New Thang" (RedFoo) Äược lan truyá»n trên mạng vá»i tá»c Äá» chóng mặt.
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Matcha Tea Powder on Amazon Prime with 2 days delivery

Organic Matcha Green Tea consists of poly-phenol EGCG, a popular formula to increase metabolic rate and assists you to shed fat quicker. Can be found in antiphon Bag with ZIP Leading RE-SALEABLE, excellent for lasting storage space. SAVE TIME on MARKING TIME at Coffee shop Houses for Green Tea Lattes. Matcha Eco-friendly Tea is an excellent source of catechin polyphenols. It is a popular anti-oxidant to safeguard body from cancers cells, cardiovascular diseases as well as excellent for skin health and wellness making us young and attractive. Matcha till brewed environment-friendly tea is high in chlorophyll, which terrific for skin health, cleanses your body and get rid of toxins.
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Top rated hyaluronic acid and vitamin c serum

​Looking for a hydrating anti-aging serum that will help you look your best? This topical vitamin c serum with hyaluronic acid will help complete fine lines and wrinkles, even complexion and blotchiness, in addition to diminish huge pores. You will enjoy the way this natural serum makes your skin appearance and feel.
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Who, among these BB athletes would you rate most?

Hi all,

Im potentially going to be working with a number of these individuals and wanted your opinions (if youd be so kind!) on their value to you and the industry.

Who would you most prefer to meet? Who do you follow most? Who are the biggest stars? Is there anyone on this list you dont know?

- Ronnie Coleman
- Zack Khan
- Jay Cutler
- Justine Munro
- Mark Anthony
- Harrison Twins
- James Alexander-Ellis
- Joe Ballinger
- Dragos Syko

Any feedback would be much appreciated!

Thank you,
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Got knee arthritis what should I do?

Hey guys recently I went to the gp and had an xray done on my knees.. and finally after chasing up the results I was told that that I have arthritis in my knees. My gp didn't even bother to explain what I should do next he just left it at that. Over this winter I have felt my knee gradually getting worse and I was wondering what I can do to stop it from getting any worse? or Is there anything I can try to actually reverse the wear and tear in my knees or is that just impossible?
Currently im just thinking about buying a knee support (I was thinking about maybe buying tis one from this place. does anyone know if knee support work or not? Would be awesome to hear some thoughts on all of this!

thank you so much.
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Important Dietary Improvements To cure Vitiligo

In this article we find that diet and eating habits can drastically affect your vitiligo and when you positively affect the diet you can see drastic improvements. We look at the most important factors and how you can change your habits to make the most impact.
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How to Buy the Best Blender for Your Kitchen

Whether you need a basic blender for morning smoothies or a high-powered model that whips up soups and nut butters with ease, we've got you covered. Here are our top picks for the very best blenders on the market right now.
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BeanStalk Hair Loss Treatment Reaches 300 Positive Reviews from Mothers on Amazon.com

BeanStalk Hair  Loss Treatment  Reaches 300 Positive Reviews from  Mothers  on Amazon.com | health | Scoop.it
Natural hair care company creates product line to not only aid scalp psoriasis, eczema and alopecia but also hair loss . Recent breakthroughs in hair loss medicine and wearable technology, as noted in the Huffington Post and Google News, has the company is happy about its customer's potential to regrowth their hair.
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Améo Gene Expression AGXtaking the essential oils market by storm

Améo Gene Expression AGXtaking the essential oils market by storm | health | Scoop.it
Améo Essential Oils jolted the essential oils world with their Scientific news that is decades ahead of the industry. striving to help your health at the gene level by influencing how our gene's express. Imagine consuming a natural pure product that is the only Essential Oil proven to permeate the cell and be active with in the cels organelles, it's this science that allowed scientist Joshua plant to uncover the true power of Améo Essential oils.
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discover The Top Tummy Tuck Surgeons In Houston Texas

Houston Tummy Tuck costs, recovery and FAQ's
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Health information that you can rely on

Here is a list of some health info that will make life easy.

https://healthymarky.wordpress.com is updated often with the latest tips and information to help you keep healthy
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What Can We Learn by Studying Neurobiological Effects and Mechanisms?

In this blog report, Dr. Wen Chen talks about NCCIH objectives for research on neurobiological effects and mechanisms.

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Any advice greatly appreciated.

Hey everyone,
I am starting a fast track 6 week course in Level 3 personal trainer course next Monday (06/06) and my nerves are starting to kick in already!!
I am really hoping to find people who have any kind of experience in doing fast track training courses in relation to health and fitness, it doesn't matter whether you only have a tiny bit of experience or you're a tutor for a fast track course/ college/ university, I would really love to hear from you.
Thanks in advance,
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Is it possible to loose 30 lbs in 3 months, with a back injury?

Hi everyone, i apologize in advance for the lengthy read, but I feel it best to post the details so theres answers to questions any might have.

a couple years ago, i was in an accident that left me with a broken L2 (lower lumbar,spinal), yes its still broken and sadly they never saw the break till 3 months after the accident so i guess i missed out on crucial pt that maybe could have helped me. I've done pt.. doesn't help with pain, its bar able, more like a constant back ache, I'm hunching over a lot now... hurts to sit upright. after the accident while i was practically immobile, i gained 40 lbs (my family thought food would make me feel better about it all, and i was soooo bored) eventually after a year and a half, i went down to 143, not back to where i was but close. i didnt work out, still drank soda and ate normal. then i hot the paraguard (birth control) and although they say it has no hormones, my body completely disagreed with this foreign object....i went back up to 168 in a about 10 months, during this time i cut out soda and ate sandwiches... only drank water... not a pound loss, only gained. i began to experience all the pms i never did before and was bloated 3 weeks out of the month. i took it out 2 months ago, and my period came almost a month late but i was seriously posing the entire time.... still having these symptoms but I'm now at 166.. so with that being said i feel my hormones are triggering a weight gain, plus the stress (cortisol?) how do i minimize all this? (bloodwork is normal, just low vit d)

so besides going up against a back injury, ( I've gone for a run, i was practically crying after 10 minutes,,, i literally layer down at the gym)
and a possible hormone/chemical imbalance....i also have a hard time planning meals and cooking. I'm currently in a hotel ( flooded home) so no kitchen but even when i move back i have a severely autistic brother who loves destroying EVERYTHING in the fridge and cabinets. my moms really passive and doesn't really stop him in time to save the milk .ect. we even lock it and still someone leaves it open.... I've bought food just for the day, and one sec i turn around soy sauce is dumped all over it.... or shampoo. I'm not saying this happens every day but 3 out of 5 times i try to cook... its unsuccessful, and i know that can have an impact on a strict diet. one last thing, i went on a recumbent bike today, kept my heart ratre at 170 for 40 minutes, i did sweat a lot, but it says i only burned 210 cal.... how do i get fit?
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Do You Need a Personal Health Coach?

Troubling but true: At my annual checkup, my primary care physician took my blood pressure, recorded my weight, listened to my heart and lungs, and declared me in decent health. Yet he didn't ask about my diet and exercise habits (inconsistent at best), stress level (off the charts) or sex life (nonexistent-hey, I've got two small kids). When I mentioned that I was having trouble sleeping and that my skin-which had been clear my whole life-was suddenly very greasy, he handed me a prescription for Ambien and a referral for a dermatologist. 

I left feeling frustrated. My MD was right: I was healthy in the sense that I wasn't suffering from any chronic diseases. But I often felt tired, unmotivated, foggy. I wanted to feel better-I knew I could feel better. I just didn't know how. 

RELATED: Things You Must Tell Your Gynecologist

Paging the health coach

It turns out my experience is not uncommon. The kinds of lifestyle changes I needed to make take time and effort. And the reality is, primary care docs can only do so much, says internist Yul Ejnes, MD, past chair of the American College of Physicians' Board of Regents: “It's hard for a doctor to help patients change their daily habits when you see them for only 10 minutes every three or six months.”

Enter the wellness coach. Providers in this rapidly growing field help bridge the gap between your office visit and your everyday life, explains Karen Lawson, MD, director of integrative health coaching at the Center for Spirituality and Healing at the University of Minnesota. “Most of us leave a doctor's appointment scratching our heads, wondering how we're going to sleep more or lose weight or eat cleaner given our busy schedules, finances, and support system, or lack thereof,” says Dr. Lawson. “A wellness coach works with you to determine the best way to integrate your physician's recommendations into your plan, so you can lead a healthier life.” 

RELATED: 10 Healthy Eating Habits That Will Change Your Life

How it works

When Leah Martinson, a health coach in Minneapolis, first meets with a new client, she typically asks her to visualize a clear picture of what she wants-her ideal wellness scenario. Then they work together to create what Martinson calls a client-driven action plan. “I don't tell people what to do,” she says. “I prompt them to figure it out for themselves.” She asks questions like “What is it about the gym that you dread?” “What kind of exercise is exciting to you?” and “What do you enjoy cooking at home?” The idea is to identify your personal barriers and how to overcome them. After that first session, Martinson sees the person regularly (for anywhere from 20 to 90 minutes at a time) to help her stay on track. “It's sort of like therapy, but with a mind-body health twist,” she says.

Wellness coaches aren't supposed to recommend specific exercise routines (as a fitness trainer would) or advise you about your nutritional needs (as registered dietitians do), explains Ruth Quillian Wolever, PhD, director of Vanderbilt Health Coaching at the Osher Center for Integrative Medicine at Vanderbilt University. They also don't diagnose conditions or suggest medications. Instead, a health coach is supposed to, well, coach you.

Consider this familiar example: Most of us know that it's healthier to order a side salad than a side of fries. “But there's a big difference between knowing what you should do and actually doing it,” points out Wolever. Coaches help people make those types of healthier choices by brainstorming with them about what will really motivate them.

Similarly, a health coach can't tell you how to reduce the amount of stress in your life. (She won't propose that you, say, consider a career switch or end a toxic relationship.)

But she can help you figure out how to manage your stress better, says Kate Motz, a health coach in Mountainside, N.J. With her clients, Motz discusses various strategies- everything from getting massages to starting a new hobby-so the clients can choose what sounds most appealing (and feasible).

The concept of wellness coaching isn't exactly new. Health-oriented destination spas like Canyon Ranch and Miraval have long offered this kind of service to their guests. What is new? The idea that most people could benefit from it, and the fact that it's more widely available right where you live.

Some doctors around the country are even starting to add coaches to their practice. Mott Blair, MD, a family physician in Wallace, N.C., says his in-office coach has been a vital addition, especially for patients dealing with new diagnoses. “When I tell patients they have diabetes or high cholesterol, there is so much information for them to absorb,” says Dr. Blair, who is also on the board of directors of the American Academy of Family Physicians. “Our health coach spends a lot of time with each person-often regularly scheduled 30-minute appointments-to help them stay motivated and accountable.”

Dr. Ejnes-whose practice in Cranston, R.I., has nurse care managers on staff to play the role of coach, keeping in touch with patients between office visits-sees this trend as a very good thing. It's part of a movement toward a more collaborative, team-based approach, he says, that will eventually lead to better, more comprehensive care. 

RELATED: Yoga Moves to Beat Insomnia, Ease Stress, and Relieve Pain

Could you benefit from one? 

Anyone who is struggling to get healthier might want to consider hiring a wellness coach, says Deborah Lee, PhD, an instructor in the Integrative Health Coach Professional Training Program at Duke Health. “When making a major change, it's totally normal to think of all the reasons you can't do it,” explains Lee, who's been there herself. After losing and then regaining 50 pounds and finding herself mentally and physically depleted, Lee hired a coach six years ago. “I'm a nurse and thought I knew how to take care of myself,” she says. “But I had hit a wall. I needed to make a change on the inside before I made a change on the outside.”

Today her wellness coach helps her incorporate movement and mindful meditation into her daily life. Lee also coaches other nurses, in addition to teaching. “I help them focus on putting their own self-care in the forefront of their lives,” she says.

Katy Cabbage, a 35-year- old research scientist in Boston, was also in a rut when she decided to make an appointment with a health coach. Cabbage had already managed to lose nearly 100 pounds on her own but had reached a plateau. “I didn't want a weight-loss coach,” she says. “It was really important to me that I was improving in all areas of my life. I knew weight loss was just one component.” 

Cabbage and her coach, Ryan Sherman, set up a schedule that involved weekly emails, a phone call every six weeks and face-to-face meetings every six months. In time, she learned to trust his advice. “He was encouraging but not unrealistic,” she says. “He would challenge me if a goal seemed wimpy or help reframe something that seemed too difficult.”

But what she found most helpful was the accountability: “I used MapMyRun+ and would send Ryan a screenshot of a run I just did, and I loved having him immediately respond with enthusiasm,” she says. Their partnership paid off. Over the course of two years, Cabbage lost another 50 pounds. “I realize now that leaning on someone to help you with your health isn't about being weak-it's about being brave. I finally have achieved a quality of life that I love,” she says.

As for me, a good friend of mine happens to be a wellness coach, and she has been helping me learn various ways to relax (that don't involve wine). I've started working out regularly and journaling about my feelings. She also connected me with a massage therapist for my body aches and a facialist for my skin. Even better, when I told her I was looking for a new doctor, she gave me the name of an internist with a holistic approach. After just a few months, I have more energy, I'm sleeping better, and my sex drive is back. At last, I feel like myself again. 

RELATED: 21 Worthless Foods a Nutritionist Will Imeediately Cut From Your Diet

Your first appointment

Got a date with a coach? Bring these essentials.

1. Your health history

Be ready to discuss chronic conditions, any medications or supplements you take, your eating habits, your current ailments and challenges, and your sleep and exercise patterns.

2. Good intentions

You may have a specific target in mind (like dropping 20 pounds), but if not, that's OK. Simply wanting to get healthier is enough. The coach's job is to help you clarify your goals.

3. Your doc's digits

If your coach isn't already working directly with your healh care providers, bring their contact info so she can reach out if necessary.

4. An open mind

A coach might help you explore complementary therapies backed by science, like acupuncture or hypnotherapy. Follow up with your doctor about any treatments you plan to pursue.

5. Your wallet

Most coaches offer an initial conversation for free. After that, expect to pay about $100 or more per session. The cost of coaching isn't typically covered by insurance, but you may be able to get reimbursed through your Flexible Spending Account.

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Who, among these BB athletes would you rate most?

Hi all,

Im potentially going to be working with a number of these individuals and wanted your opinions (if youd be so kind!) on their value to you and the industry.

Who would you most prefer to meet? Who do you follow most? Who are the biggest stars? Is there anyone on this list you dont know?

- Ronnie Coleman
- Zack Khan
- Jay Cutler
- Justine Munro
- Mark Anthony
- Harrison Twins
- James Alexander-Ellis
- Joe Ballinger
- Dragos Syko

Any feedback would be much appreciated!

Thank you,
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12 Ways to Make Your Office Better for Your Health

You spend eight hours a day at work—at least. Here's how to make your office a healthier place to be
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Dentist in Long Beach CA

Dr. Campbell is committed to providing exceptional care to his patients and their families. His practice successfully merges the newest technology of dentistry in a welcoming and warm environment for the entire family.

Dentistry has developed to best fit patient needs. Brand-new and emerging technology is sought to make our clients' experience as comfortable as possible. Here is just a few various innovations that good Dental practices utilize to guarantee they offer world-class service to all our patients:

1. VELscope - VELscope is a unique kind of light that a dentist will shine in a client's mouth to detect any irregularities. This new kind of technology is successfully used to find early types of cancer or disease during an oral cancer screening.

2. Digital X-Rays - Digital X-rays are much faster and include less radiation than traditional X-rays. When a client has a digital X-ray done, the image appears on the computer system in a matter of seconds. Your dental professional can then zoom into the image to much better examine and educate the patient concerning their oral health. Digital X-rays are likewise less dangerous for patients as they consist of as much as 90 % less radiation compared to traditional X-rays.

3. Invisalign - Invisalign are clear, practically invisible braces that can gently align your teeth. They provide a reliable and comfortable way to align your smile without the trouble of wearing heavy, metal braces. Invisalign braces are simple to secure for cleaning and do not require a constraint on what type of foods to eat. They get the job done in less time with less inconvenience.

4. Laser Dentistry - Lasers are utilized to improve efficiency and eliminate pain in a number oral treatments, consisting of filling cavities, lowering tooth level of sensitivity, doing away with tumors, and whitening. Laser dentistry is fast, painless, and can efficiently eliminate any kind of germs throughout the treatment to avoid any additional issues or problems.

5. Dental Implants - Dental implants are screw-replacements for the root portion of missing teeth. Implants are used to restore healthy smiles when patients have missing out on teeth. Implants are effective due to the fact that they can change missing teeth, while still providing the client the feel and look of a natural tooth.

6. HealOzone - HealOzone is a quick, simple and pain-free method to get rid of dental caries. HealOzone works because it consists of ozone (O3), which is a typical, gas that effectively kills germs and fungus. HealOzone is a terrific device to discover and do away with any early signs of tooth decay before it advances to an advanced phase.

7. Intraoral Camera - The intraoral camera is a tool that dental practitioners use to get exact and well-defined photos of tough to see locations within a client's mouth. The camera likewise enables dentist to show these images to clients while examining and informing the client's requirements. This new kind of innovation allows dental expert to perform a comprehensive checkup of your mouth and much better evaluate their client's oral care requirements.


Visit Dr. Campbell or go to www.drgregcampbell.com today! By utilizing brand-new and advancing technology in our dental practices, we can make your see as comfortable and reliable as possible!
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A Smart Guide To Scary Chemicals

"Scientists issue warning over chemicals in carpets, coats, cookware." "chemicals in pizza boxes may be health risk."

Headlines like these make you want to curl up on the sofa and never leave the house—except that couch! Chances are it's loaded with toxic chemicals, too. As a savvy, health-conscious (and, OK, slightly worry-prone) woman, how are you supposed to function in a world where everything from the dust bunnies in your home to your ATM receipt could be poisoning you?

First, some perspective: Yes, chemicals are everywhere, and some are undoubtedly harmful. But linking a health issue, whether it's breast cancer or premature births, to specific substances is difficult. "We're exposed to so many chemicals—some potentially hazardous, some not—and often health problems take months or years to develop. That makes it tricky to identify the culprit," explains Tracey Woodruff, PhD, director of the Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF).

Moreover, the average person's exposure to any one toxin is relatively low, as is her individual health risk. The potential peril of, say, eating microwave popcorn pales in comparison to smoking, which is directly responsible for 30 percent of cancer deaths, says Margaret Kripke, PhD, professor emerita at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston and co-author of the President's Cancer Panel report on environmental cancer risk.

RELATED: 9 Ways to Detox Your Home

That said, developing fetuses, infants and children are more vulnerable to chemicals' effects. In fact, this fall, the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics issued a report sounding an alarm about the serious health effects of exposure to toxic chemicals during pregnancy and breast-feeding.

Whether you have little ones or not, it's smart to understand the science behind the most buzzed-about chemicals. We talked to top scientists and analyzed the research to find out what you should really be concerned about and how you can protect yourself and the planet.

Flame retardants (including polybrominated diphenyl ethers, or PDBEs)

What are they?
In the 1970s, California instituted strict flammability standards for upholstered furniture sold in the state, leading manufacturers to add flame-retardant chemicals to the foam used in furniture sold throughout the U.S. Today these chemicals—designed to inhibit the spread of fire—are in chairs, sofas, cars, commercial airplanes and infant car seats. A typical sofa contains three or more pounds of treated foam.

What's the worry?
Because the flame retardants are sprayed on rather than chemically bonded to the product, the molecules migrate out of the products and collect in household dust, where they get on our hands and, inevitably, into our mouths and bodies, says Philip Landrigan, MD, a pediatrician and dean for global health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. Studies have linked different formulations to a variety of health problems, but the most worrisome issue is the effects on infants' brain development. "PBDEs are fat-soluble and can easily enter the brain," says Dr. Landrigan. "When that happens to babies in the womb and during infancy, it can result in reduced IQ and a shorter attention span."

RELATED: 10 Products You Think Are Healthy, But Aren't

Flame-retardant chemicals build up in body fat and, as a result, have been found in breast milk, infant cord blood and children's blood. Children are also more exposed than adults because they crawl or play on the floor, where they come into contact with chemical-laden dust, says Ted Schettler, MD, science director of the Science and Environmental Health Network.
Several types of flame retardants have already been phased out due to safety concerns, but other (and possibly dangerous) ones have taken their place—and the old versions will likely remain in the environment for years, since they're designed to be durable.

Reduce your risk
It's not realistic to buy all new furniture, but old sofas with crumbling foam should be a priority because they release the most chemicals, says Marya G. Zlatnik, MD, professor of maternal-fetal medicine at UCSF.

The great news: In early 2014, California revised its flammability regulations, enabling furniture makers to meet the standards without flame-retardant chemicals. Many companies, including Ashley Furniture, Crate & Barrel, Ikea, La-Z-Boy and Walmart, now sell upholstered products without the chemicals. (Go to health.com/non-toxic-couch for more details on how to find furniture without flame retardants.)

RELATED: How to Clean Everything Better

New couch not in the budget? You may be able to update just the cushions with flame retardant--free foam at a local upholstery shop. In the meantime, dust and vacuum (vacuums with HEPA filters are best at removing small particles) several times a week to rid your home of dust that contains the chemicals, advises Dr. Zlatnik, and wash your hands (and your kids') before eating.


Next Page: Formaldehyde

Formaldehyde

What is it?
This pungent, flammable chemical is found in the wood glue used in furniture and flooring (especially laminate) and many manufactured wood products, like particle board, medium-density fiberboard and hardwood plywood. The chemical grabbed national attention after Hurricane Katrina, when people who were put up in trailers provided by the Federal Emergency Management Agency started suffering from respiratory problems, headaches and nosebleeds linked to high concentrations of formaldehyde in the air. It made headlines again this year when 60 Minutes reported that Chinese-made laminate flooring sold by Lumber Liquidators emitted formaldehyde at levels exceeding California standards. (The company has stopped selling the product, though its own testing program showed that the vast majority of customers' homes were within safe levels.)

RELATED: 10 Ways to Keep Air Clean at Home

What's the worry?
Inhaling formaldehyde can cause nose, throat and eye irritation and trigger asthma attacks—probably the biggest risk for most people, says David Krause, PhD, a toxicologist in Tallahassee, Fla. Although the National Toxicology Program said formaldehyde is "known to be a human carcinogen" in 2011, after studies linked it to cancers of the nose and myeloid leukemia, that research looked at manufacturing and funeral industry workers, who are exposed to higher levels of the substance than the general population, explains Laura Beane Freeman, PhD, an epidemiologist at the National Cancer Institute. However, the Environmental Protection Agency is concerned enough about the chemical that it is finalizing new national rules that will set limits on formaldehyde emissions from composite wood products.

Other formaldehyde-related concerns, like getting Brazilian blowouts, are likely overhyped, says Krause. "I'd be more worried about hairdressers who are exposed to those chemicals routinely than a woman who gets the treatment a few times a year," he says.

Reduce your risk
If solid wood isn't an option, the next best thing is to buy wood products that comply with the formaldehyde regulations set by the California Air Resources Board (CARB)—they're the most stringent to date. (Look for a label indicating CARB phase 2 compliance, or ask the manufacturer directly if the product meets those standards.) Put products in the garage or a spare bedroom to allow the chemical to off-gas for a few days to a few weeks—or until they don't smell, which is a good sign that a large portion has off-gassed, says Krause. If you don't have that kind of time, keep your windows open as much as you can for the first few months after a new wood product is in your home.

RELATED: 8 Ways to Protect Your Health (And the Planet)

PFASs (poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances; also known as perfluorinated chemicals, or PFCs)

What are they?
These compounds make products more resistant to stains, grease and water; they're found in such items as sofas, carpets, pizza boxes, microwave popcorn bags and waterproof clothing. They're also in some nonstick cookware.

What's the worry?
PFASs can accumulate in the body (including the brain, liver, lungs, bones and kidneys) and remain for as long as a decade. Studies have shown links to kidney cancer, high cholesterol, obesity, abnormal thyroid function, pregnancy-induced high blood pressure and low-birth-weight infants. Most of the research has been done on folks with very high exposures, including those who lived near chemical plants in West Virginia and Ohio, where drinking water had become contaminated. But even low levels are a concern, says Simona Balan, PhD, senior scientist at the Green Science Policy Institute in Berkeley, Calif.

And almost everyone has traces of PFASs in their blood, per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Released from factories and consumer products, they accumulate in the environment (some versions won't degrade for thousands of years), ending up in water, fish and livestock. In May, a group of more than 200 researchers and scientists from all over the world signed the Madrid Statement, asking for a limit to production and use of these chemicals.

Reduce your risk
You probably can't completely avoid eating and drinking PFASs, but you can wash your hands often to remove those you pick up around the house (they may collect in household dust), and replace your nonstick cookware with ceramic-coated pans, advises Linda S. Birnbaum, PhD, director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and the National Toxicology Program. Make popcorn on the stove instead of in the microwave, and don't get stain-resistant finishes on new cars or furniture.

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You can also help reduce the amount of these chemicals that get into the environment by opting for clothing that hasn't been treated with PFASs. Brands that have committed to phasing out the substances include Adidas, Puma and Zara. (Scientists don't know enough about whether PFASs are absorbed through the skin, so it's unclear if clothing treated with them poses a direct health risk, says Birnbaum.)


Next Page: BPA

BPA (bisphenol A)

What is it?
BPA is used to make hard polycarbonate plastics (like those used for water bottles and food-storage containers) and epoxy resins, found in the lining of many food cans. There was a big news splash about the fact that it's in the thermal receipt paper you might get at the ATM and grocery store—but food and drink are the primary way most of us are exposed, according to the National Institutes of Health.

What's the worry?
BPA is considered an endocrine-disrupting chemical, which means it may act like a hormone in the body and affect the functioning of natural hormones, like estrogen. "It can potentially have a negative impact on fetal development, including brain development," says Dr. Schettler. In 2014, researchers from nine institutions, including the Harvard School of Public Health and the University of Michigan, concluded that BPA is a "reproductive toxicant," based on studies showing that it reduced egg quality in women undergoing in vitro fertilization—and said there's strong evidence that it's toxic to the uterus as well. "It could disrupt women's ability to get pregnant," says Woodruff.

There's also preliminary evidence that it may be linked to obesity. Several years ago, Harvard researchers reported that people who had higher BPA concentrations in their urine were more likely to be obese; in May, Canadian researchers reported that the body seems to break down BPA into a compound that might spur the growth of fat cells.

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Reduce your risk Eat fresh or frozen food instead of canned, or choose brands sold in BPA-free cans. Researchers from Harvard and the CDC found that people who consumed a 12-ounce serving of canned soup every day for five days had a twelvefold increase in BPA levels in their urine compared with those who ate fresh soup—a temporary blip, since the body gets rid of BPA quickly, but potentially worrisome if you eat canned food regularly or have other exposures. Store food in glass, porcelain or stainless steel containers. And avoid microwaving in plastic, because heating the containers allows the chemicals they contain (whether BPA or other compounds) to leach into food, says Birnbaum.

Pesticides (including organophosphates)

What are they?
Poisons formulated to kill, harm or repel pests. Farmers may apply them on fields, and they're in many lawn, garden and home products.

What's the worry?
They can damage your nervous system, irritate your skin or eyes, affect your hormones or even cause cancer. The biggest risk by far is to farm workers and those who live near farms, who are exposed to higher levels than the rest of us, says Irva Hertz-Picciotto, PhD, a pesticide researcher at the UC Davis MIND Institute.

For starters, farmers and other agricultural workers appear to have higher rates of certain cancers. In March, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), part of the World Health Organization, raised new concerns about a link between glyphosate, the active ingredient in weed killers such as Roundup, and cancer risk. (Monsanto, the maker of Roundup, disputes the IARC's findings.) But pesticides in the home also pose a potential danger. A new review published in Pediatrics connected indoor pesticide exposure to a significantly higher risk of childhood leukemia and lymphoma.

Researchers are also studying the relationship between pesticides and neurodevelopmental disorders. A study of an agricultural region of California found that evidence of pesticide exposure in pregnant women was linked to a higher risk of attention problems in their young children. And last year, researchers at the MIND Institute reported that pregnant women who lived near fields where chemical pesticides were used had a roughly two-thirds higher risk of having a child with autism spectrum disorder, and an even higher risk of having one with other developmental delays.
What about pesticide residues in nonorganic food? The American Cancer Society says there's no evidence at present that they increase the risk of cancer. However, research by Hertz-Picciotto and her colleagues has shown that there may be a risk to kids' neurological health.

Reduce your risk Go organic. "That alone can reduce exposure to pesticides by 90 percent," says Dr. Landrigan. When researchers at Emory University and the University of Washington substituted organic food for children's conventional diets for five days, the metabolites for two types of organophosphate pesticides all but disappeared from the kids' urine. Can't afford all-organic? Choose fruits and veggies with lower pesticide residues (see the Environmental Working Group's guide at ewg.org/foodnews/summary.php) and scrub them with water to reduce surface chemicals further.

And, of course, minimize or eliminate the use of pesticides and herbicides in and around your home—and remove shoes at the door to prevent tracking in chemicals, says Dr. Zlatnik.

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Phthalates

What are they?
These chemicals make plastic flexible (think vinyl shower curtains, food packaging and soft plastic food containers, garden hoses, medical tubing, kids' toys). They're also in products like shampoo, hairspray and nail polish; if you see "parfum" or "fragrance" on a label, it could contain phthalates.

What's the worry?
Phthalates, which decrease testosterone and may also mimic estrogen, have been linked to increased breast cancer risk. "I'm particularly concerned about the effects during pregnancy," says Shanna Swan, PhD, professor of preventive medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. She and her colleagues have found that exposure to phthalates in the womb might affect baby boys' sexual development. "Fetal development is to a large extent determined by hormones, so phthalates may be having other subtle effects as well," she says.

Those at elevated risk include women exposed to high levels through jobs in the automotive industry, rubber hose manufacturing facilities and nail salons, but as with other endocrine-disrupting chemicals, scientists are concerned that low doses might be harmful, too.

Reduce your risk The main source of exposure to one of the most concerning phthalates, DEHP, is food, says Swan, so avoid microwaving in plastic, and if you eat, drink or store food in plastic, steer clear of those labeled #3. Also, buy low-fat dairy products and eat leaner cuts of meat, says Sheela Sathyanarayana, MD, associate professor in the department of pediatrics at the University of Washington. In 2014, she and colleagues reported that dairy (particularly cream) and meat can contain high levels of a certain type of phthalate, possibly from animal feed or because the chemicals leach into the food from plastics used in processing and packaging.

Congress has already banned several phthalates in toys and in teething and feeding products, but since plastics contain a concoction of chemicals, it's best to avoid plastic toys until your child outgrows the tendency to mouth them, advises Woodruff.

Phthalates can be inhaled and absorbed through the skin as well, which means personal-care products may pose a slight risk. "Choose products that contain few ingredients and are unscented—which means they probably don't contain phthalates," says Woodruff.

As scientists continue to sift through the concerns over chemicals, new scares are likely to keep making headlines. But instead of fretting, let Congress know where you stand. And try to put the risks in perspective, suggests Woodruff: "The sanest approach is to make a few changes to the food and products you buy and adopt some simple habits that reduce your exposure—then enjoy your life.


Next Page: What about parabens?

What about parabens?

These preservatives (found in products like makeup, moisturizers and hair care) have been in use since the 1930s and have long been deemed safe. Parabens are considered to be weak estrogen mimics—10,000 to 100,000 times less active than the estrogen in your body, according to one 1998 study. While they could theoretically increase breast cancer risk, at this point the risk is just that—theoretical—"and based on animal and other lab studies," says Janet Gray, PhD, director of science, technology and society at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., who researches environmental impacts on breast cancer. Bottom line: There's no need to panic about parabens, but it's always wise to limit your exposure to any chemicals that may act like hormones—in this case, by opting for paraben-free personal-care products.

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Additives that only sound dangerous

Just because these ingredients have hard-to-pronounce names doesn't make them evil. Don't freak if you see them on the side of a package; they're safe.

Azodicarbonamide is added to flour as a whitening agent and to help bread dough rise. It caused an uproar when it was revealed that it's also used to make yoga mats and a variety of other products you wouldn't want to eat. The World Health Organization has said it can be potentially dangerous when inhaled, possibly triggering asthma in workers who are heavily exposed during the manufacturing process. But as a food additive, it is used in tiny amounts—a maximum of 0.0045 percent of the treated flour, points out Alissa Rumsey, RD, spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Xanthan gum is a sugarlike substance made from fermentation, feeding cornstarch to bacteria. It's used as a thickener and emulsifier—it helps keep oil and water from separating in products—and increases shelf life. It's in salad dressings and sauces and is what gives most gluten-free breads and baked goods a texture similar to that of wheat-based breads. Some people are allergic to xanthan gum, but if you don't have an allergy, it's harmless, says Rumsey.

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Ascorbyl palmitate is a fat-soluble form of vitamin C. It helps increase the shelf life of foods and makes food color last longer. When you consume it, it breaks down into vitamin C (ascorbic acid) and palmitate, a kind of fat, explains Rumsey. "Vitamins often have worrisome-sounding names, but this one is actually an antioxidant, so it's good for you," says Robert Gravani, PhD, professor of food science at Cornell University.

Lecithin is a type of fat usually derived from egg yolks or soybeans. It's used as an emulsifier in salad dressing and as a stabilizer in bread. "It's a fat that's essential to most cells in our bodies," notes Gravani. Unless you have a soy or egg allergy, lecithin is safe to consume, says Rumsey.

Calcium propionate is added to breads and bakery products to prevent mold and bacteria growth. It has been studied extensively for toxicity, and findings were negative, says Rumsey. "Some people may get migraines triggered by foods with this preservative," she notes, "but there hasn't been much research to back this up."

Take action

It's natural to assume that the government has safety checks in place for environmental chemicals, but that's not the case. In 1976, when Congress passed the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), there were roughly 62,000 substances already in use in the U.S.—all of which were grandfathered in by Congress and presumed to be safe, without testing. Since then, another 20,000 chemicals have come on the market, and very few have been tested, thanks to weak regulation, says Philip Landrigan, MD, dean for global health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

You can help make a difference in the fight to keep toxic chemicals out of our bodies and our environment. Voice your support for chemical safety reform, which Congress is currently debating: Write your members of Congress to say you're in favor of reforming the TSCA; learn more and join the movement at health.com/chemical-safety.

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3 things you don't have to worry about

Dyeing your hair.
Though ingredients in older (pre-1980) hair- dye formulas were shown to cause cancer in lab animals, those ingredients are no longer in use; newer studies haven't found a cancer link. Hairdressers exposed to dyes at work may have a slightly higher risk of bladder cancer, but the IARC says there's not enough evidence to link personal hair-dye use and cancer.

Keeping your mercury fillings
"I have no qualms about using them to treat my patients," says Hadie Rifai, DDS, a dentist with the Cleveland Clinic, and everyone from the Mayo Clinic to the FDA and American Dental Association agrees they're safe.

Eating sushi once a week.
"It's safe to eat two servings of fish a week. Just go for a variety of types," says Emily Oken, MD, associate professor in the department of population medicine at the Harvard School of Public Health. "That way, you get the health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids and, as long as you're not pregnant, you don't need to worry about mercury exposure."

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