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Healthy man, healthy sperm - why men need to shape up for pregnancy

Healthy man, healthy sperm - why men need to shape up for pregnancy | Health | Scoop.it
What does a would-be father's waistline have to do with the health of his future children?  

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How and who you exercise with affects your mental wellbeing

How and who you exercise with affects your mental wellbeing | Health | Scoop.it
How and who you exercise with affects your mental wellbeing • Exercising with others improves happiness, energy and wellbeing • Getting active in natural settings improves overall wellbeing • High energy levels yet depressed mood for people who ...

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Bye Bye Gray Hair! Here is a Powerful Remedy to Reverse Gray Hair at Home Naturally - Health And Healthy Living

Bye Bye Gray Hair! Here is a Powerful Remedy to Reverse Gray Hair at Home Naturally - Health And Healthy Living | Health | Scoop.it
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6 Health Problems You Can Treat By Eating More Hummus

6 Health Problems You Can Treat By Eating More Hummus | Health | Scoop.it
The Middle Eastern superfood dip can alleviate a variety of health issues, from anemia to cholesterol.
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How To Train Yourself To Be More Focused And Productive

How To Train Yourself To Be More Focused And Productive | Health | Scoop.it
Sharpening your focus might be a matter of checking yourself continuously to make sure your attention isn’t lapsing.
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Get a better understanding of the Ebola virus

Get a better understanding of the Ebola virus | Health | Scoop.it

As a virus, Ebola is remarkably average. Appearance-wise, it forms an unusually long and flexible filament—although other viruses are filamentous, Dr. Vincent Racaniello, a researcher at Columbia University's Medical School and host of the This Week in Virology podcast, was hard pressed to think of any that are quite as bendy as Ebola. On the genetic level, however, things look fairly mundane. Its genome consists of a single linear strand of RNA that's about 19,000 bases long. It contains only seven genes, most of which encode proteins that give the virus its structure. For comparison, a typical herpes virus is over 10 times larger and carries over 35 genes. "It's a pretty basic complement of proteins—all RNA viruses need the same ones," Racaniello said.


One gene, called NP, encodes a protein that coats the RNA and keeps it packaged inside the virus particle. Two other proteins, VP24 and VP40, coat the inside of the membrane that forms the outer layer of the virus—membrane that was originally produced by an infected cell.

 

Beyond those proteins, things get more interesting. The only genetic material that can be duplicated by the enzymes carried by cells is DNA. But, as we noted, Ebola's genome is encoded by RNA. Viruses handle this discrepancy in two ways. Some of them, like HIV, encode an enzyme that copies RNA into DNA, and additional copies of the virus are then made from this DNA. Ebola virus takes the alternative route: its genome encodes a protein that can copy RNA into RNA.


This gene (creatively called the polymerase, or L) is the largest one carried by the virus. The viral polymerase performs a double role in that it also copies the viral genome into messenger RNAs that are then translated into proteins by the infected cells. So, without a working polymerase, you can't make any proteins inside an infected cell. For this reason, every copy of the virus has a working polymerase protein packed inside.


There's a second protein that's involved in making messenger RNAs and copies of the virus—it tells the polymerase where to start copying. It's called VP35, and it's also packed inside the virus when it's sent off to infect new cells. This protein functions to help the virus evade an immune response. The body's immune system consists of two parts that work cooperatively. The one we mostly learn about, acquired immunity, involves antibodies and other specialized receptors that recognize specific infectious agents. Acquired immunity is the whole reason vaccines work. But this takes a while to get up to speed when a pathogen has never been encountered before.


This all may sound rather exotic, but it's actually quite common. The group of negative-strand RNA viruses, including Ebola, is quite large. Among human pathogens alone, it includes influenza, measles, mumps, rabies, and hantaviruses. So while this aspect of Ebola is interesting, it's anything but exotic, and it certainly doesn't explain the disease's behavior.



Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Google trial lets you chat with doctors when you search for symptoms

Google trial lets you chat with doctors when you search for symptoms | Health | Scoop.it

Searching the web for symptoms of illness can be dangerous -- you could identify a real condition, but you also risk scaring yourself for no reason through a misdiagnosis.

 

Google might have a solution that puts your mind at ease, though.

 

The company has confirmed to Engadget that it's testing a Helpouts-style feature which offers video chats with doctors when you search for symptoms. While there aren't many details of how this works in practice, the search card mentions that Google is covering the costs of any chats during the trial phase.

 

You'll likely have to pay for virtual appointments if and when the service is ever ready for prime time, then. That's not ideal, but it could be much cheaper than seeing a physician in person.

 

 original: http://www.engadget.com/2014/10/11/google-tests-doctor-video-chats/ ;
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Medlicker.com's curator insight, October 15, 2014 4:15 AM

The problem is that virtual appointments can never replace the actual "physical" interaction between doctors and patients. Doctors use (and should continue to do so) their sight, touch, perception, laboratory and histology assessments. Maybe in some medical fields this "remote" appointment may work but I cannot imagine how a good doctor proceeds with diagnosing appendicitis "remotely" without being able to touch the patient´s stomach. My opinion is that we should carefully select medical fields and diagnosis, which could be made remotely and restrict those, which can increase the risk for the patient of being misdiagnosed.

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The 12 New Rules of Eating Healthy

The 12 New Rules of Eating Healthy | Health | Scoop.it
What does a healthy diet mean these days? Scientists change the script daily, and there have never been more food trends to follow blindly. Here's our b.s.-free guide to eating healthy now
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6 Things Your Blood Type Can Say About Your Health

6 Things Your Blood Type Can Say About Your Health | Health | Scoop.it
The antigens living on the surface of your red blood cells can determine a lot more than just who you can donate to.

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
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WHO: Ebola virus disease fact sheet

WHO: Ebola virus disease fact sheet | Health | Scoop.it
The Ebola virus causes an acute, serious illness which is often fatal if untreated. Ebola virus disease (EVD) first appeared in 1976 in 2 simultaneous outbreaks, one in Nzara, Sudan, and the other in Yambuku, Democratic Republic of Congo. The latter occurred in a village near the Ebola River, from which the disease takes its name.

The current outbreak in west Africa, (first cases notified in March 2014), is the largest and most complex Ebola outbreak since the Ebola virus was first discovered in 1976. There have been more cases and deaths in this outbreak than all others combined. It has also spread between countries starting in Guinea then spreading across land borders to Sierra Leone and Liberia, by air (1 traveller only) to Nigeria, and by land (1 traveller) to Senegal.

The most severely affected countries, Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia have very weak health systems, lacking human and infrastructural resources, having only recently emerged from long periods of conflict and instability. On August 8, the WHO Director-General declared this outbreak a Public Health Emergency of International Concern.

A separate, unrelated Ebola outbreak began in Boende, Equateur, an isolated part of the Democratic Republic of Congo.

The virus family Filoviridae includes 3 genera: Cuevavirus, Marburgvirus, and Ebolavirus. There are 5 species that have been identified: Zaire, Bundibugyo, Sudan, Reston and Taï Forest. The first 3, Bundibugyo ebolavirus, Zaire ebolavirus, and Sudan ebolavirus have been associated with large outbreaks in Africa. The virus causing the 2014 west African outbreak belongs to the Zaire species.

 

Key facts

Ebola virus disease (EVD), formerly known as Ebola haemorrhagic fever, is a severe, often fatal illness in humans.The virus is transmitted to people from wild animals and spreads in the human population through human-to-human transmission.The average EVD case fatality rate is around 50%. Case fatality rates have varied from 25% to 90% in past outbreaks.The first EVD outbreaks occurred in remote villages in Central Africa, near tropical rainforests, but the most recent outbreak in west Africa has involved major urban as well as rural areas.Community engagement is key to successfully controlling outbreaks. Good outbreak control relies on applying a package of interventions, namely case management, surveillance and contact tracing, a good laboratory service, safe burials and social mobilisation.Early supportive care with rehydration, symptomatic treatment improves survival. There is as yet no licensed treatment proven to neutralise the virus but a range of blood, immunological and drug therapies are under development.There are currently no licensed Ebola vaccines but 2 potential candidates are undergoing evaluation.

 

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs103/en/http://ecdc.europa.eu/en/healthtopics/ebola_marburg_fevers/factsheet-for-health-professionals/Pages/factsheet_health_professionals.aspxhttp://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/lab-bio/res/psds-ftss/ebola-eng.phphttp://www.usamriid.army.mil/education/bluebookpdf/USAMRIID%20BlueBook%207th%20Edition%20-%20Sep%202011.pdfhttp://jid.oxfordjournals.org/content/196/Supplement_2/S142.fullhttp://jid.oxfordjournals.org/content/179/Supplement_1/S170.longhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9988162http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/890413
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Symptoms of Low Testosterone On Men

Symptoms of Low Testosterone On Men | Health | Scoop.it
During puberty, it is very helpful for men in terms of the development of the testes and penis, and also plays an important role in hair growth on the face and genitals, including the inland sounds. Testosterone also continues to play an important role after adolescence. It is helpful to inform everything from the libido …

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
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Pomegranate May Hold The Key To Quieting Alzheimer's

Pomegranate May Hold The Key To Quieting Alzheimer's | Health | Scoop.it
The compound punicalagin, found in the skins and fruits of pomegranates, could protect brain health into old age.

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
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Bernadette Bug's curator insight, August 24, 2014 3:38 AM

And among all it is delicioux!

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Human urine can be a cheap, durable and effective alternative to platinum-carbon as a catalyst for fuel cells

Human urine can be a cheap, durable and effective alternative to platinum-carbon as a catalyst for fuel cells | Health | Scoop.it
Human urine, otherwise potentially polluting waste, is an universal unused resource in organic form disposed by the human body. We present for the first time “proof of concept” of a convenient, perhaps economically beneficial, and innovative template-free route to synthesize highly porous carbon containing heteroatoms such as N, S, Si, and P from human urine waste as a single precursor for carbon and multiple heteroatoms. High porosity is created through removal of inherently-present salt particles in as-prepared “Urine Carbon” (URC), and multiple heteroatoms are naturally doped into the carbon, making it unnecessary to employ troublesome expensive pore-generating templates as well as extra costly heteroatom-containing organic precursors. Additionally, isolation of rock salts is an extra bonus of present work. The technique is simple, but successful, offering naturally doped conductive hierarchical porous URC, which leads to superior electrocatalytic ORR activity comparable to state of the art Pt/C catalyst along with much improved durability and methanol tolerance, demonstrating that the URC can be a promising alternative to costly Pt-based electrocatalyst for ORR. The ORR activity can be addressed in terms of heteroatom doping, surface properties and electrical conductivity of the carbon framework.

Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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How to gain strength ... fast

How to gain strength ... fast | Health | Scoop.it

Strength has long been a point of comparison with others and a way of rating our physical prowess in the gym.


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Men's Health: 8 Things Your Penis Can Tell You About Your Health

Men's Health: 8 Things Your Penis Can Tell You About Your Health | Health | Scoop.it
Men, find out how your penis serves as a good indicator of health — from it keeping its shape to getting an erection.
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On National Doctor's Day, A Look At How Things Have Changed [SLIDESHOW]

On National Doctor's Day, A Look At How Things Have Changed [SLIDESHOW] | Health | Scoop.it
National Doctor's Day marks a day of celebrating thousands of years of innovative medical practice and patient treatment.
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This Is What Causes Male Infertility

This Is What Causes Male Infertility | Health | Scoop.it
DNA packaging during sperm development is essential for male fertility, and when this process somehow goes awry, the result is infertility.
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'Dirty Old London': Geographies of Human Waste

'Dirty Old London': Geographies of Human Waste | Health | Scoop.it

In the 19th century, London was the capital of the largest empire the world had ever known — and it was infamously filthy. It had choking, sooty fogs; the Thames River was thick with human sewage; and the streets were covered with mud.  But according to Lee Jackson, author of Dirty Old London: The Victorian Fight Against Filth, mud was actually a euphemism. 'It was essentially composed of horse dung,' he tells Fresh Air's Sam Briger. 'There were tens of thousands of working horses in London [with] inevitable consequences for the streets. And the Victorians never really found an effective way of removing that, unfortunately.'"


Via Seth Dixon
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Samuel Meyer's curator insight, March 23, 2015 12:03 PM

London has come a far way from the industrial town it was in the 19th century, and is now cleaner than ever. But pollution led to many issues in London at the time. This is also evident in the developing world today, such as in China, Africa, and South America.

EuroHistoireGeoAmiens's curator insight, April 11, 2015 10:16 AM

Pas mal en première pour une étude détaillée du Londres de Dickens

Emily Bian's curator insight, May 23, 2015 11:41 AM

This article is about London, UK during the time of Industrial Revolution. The city of London expanded so rapidly, that there wasn't enough time for urban planning. Factories and houses were going up everywhere, and thousands of people migrated to London for jobs. This led to an influx of filth. The air was polluted and there wasn't adequate irrigation systems or waste systems. Everything dirty could be found on the streets like horse dung, and the water would get polluted and unsanitary. 

I liked this article, because it really created an image in my head how terrible and filthy the Industrial Revolution was at the start. 

7)Development and character of cities

Development and character of cities

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Teixobactin: The Answer To The Antibiotic Crisis

Teixobactin: The Answer To The Antibiotic Crisis | Health | Scoop.it
Teixobactin, a newly found antibiotic, can not only kill superbugs but also prevent the formation of new ones.
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How Ebola sped out of control

How Ebola sped out of control | Health | Scoop.it
The story behind the failure of the world's health organizations to stop the Ebola disaster.

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Bella The Non-Vampire's curator insight, January 12, 2015 10:18 AM

The development between MDCs and LDCs are very different in a lot of ways. The Ebola epidemic is handled in two different ways because of the levels of development in countries. in MDCs there is more of a health indutry and can cure sicknesses much faster than those countries of less development. 

I.C.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 9, 2015 2:29 PM

It was sad that it took over 4 months for there to be declared an epidemic.  I think if this hit in the US or Europe then things would have been taken care of a lot faster.  Out of sight, out of mind till one trickled in then another.  Then we got scared.  But Africa needs to get it together and create a better continent with healthcare systems that work.  The doctors over there said it looked medieval.  I believe that and can't even fathom how horrible it was.  

Molly McComb's curator insight, May 27, 2015 11:11 AM

Talking about the failure of WHO to stop the Ebola outbreak and how the low developed countries were so quickly affected by the disease. 

 

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5 Unusual Ways To Boost Your Memory

5 Unusual Ways To Boost Your Memory | Health | Scoop.it
If you want to boost your memory, consider laughing more, sleeping more, drinking more green tea, sitting up straighter, and taking notes by hand.
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20 Smart Devices For Better Health And Fitness

20 Smart Devices For Better Health And Fitness | Health | Scoop.it

20 Smart Devices For Better Health And Fitness


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'Raindrop' implant in your eye could banish reading glasses

'Raindrop' implant in your eye could banish reading glasses | Health | Scoop.it
The implant - known as a Raindrop - is placed underneath the cornea in a bid to reverse vision problems associated with ageing and could replace laser eye surgery.

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
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'The war on cancer may NEVER be won': Cure 'could be impossible' because the disease is so highly evolved

'The war on cancer may NEVER be won': Cure 'could be impossible' because the disease is so highly evolved | Health | Scoop.it
Researchers in Germany and Croatia found the disease is more evolved than previously thought, having identified tumours in two types of hydra - simple freshwater animals - that date back millions of years.

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Soon, decayed teeth may repair themselves

Soon, decayed teeth may repair themselves | Health | Scoop.it
British scientists have discovered a technique which can make a decayed tooth repair itself.

 

The technique, developed at King's College, London, effectively reverses decay by using electrical currents to boost the tooth's natural repair process.

This path-breaking treatment could be available in three years, according to the British researchers who created it.

The two-step method developed first prepares the damaged part of the enamel outer layer of the tooth and then uses a tiny electric current to 'push' minerals into the tooth to repair the damaged site.

The defect is remineralized in a painless process that requires no drills, no injections and no filling materials. Electric currents are already used by dentists to check the pulp or nerve of a tooth; the new device uses a far smaller current than that currently used on patients and which cannot be felt by the patient.

The technique is known as Electrically Accelerated and Enhanced Remineralization.

The researchers said, "Dentists could soon be giving your teeth a mild 'time warp' to encourage them to self-repair . It aims to take the pain out of tooth decay treatment by electrically reversing the process to help teeth 'remineralize' ."

Nigel Pitts from the Dental Institute at King's College London said, "The way we treat teeth today is not ideal - when we repair a tooth by putting in a filling, that tooth enters a cycle of drilling and re-filling as, ultimately, each "repair" fails. Not only is our device kinder to the patient and better for their teeth, but it's expected to be at least as cost-effective as current dental treatments. Along with fighting tooth decay, our device can also be used to whiten teeth."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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