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‘Perfectly healthy’ Florida girl paralyzed with rare brain infection four days after receiving flu shot

‘Perfectly healthy’ Florida girl paralyzed with rare brain infection four days after receiving flu shot | Health and Medical PR | Scoop.it
10-year-old unable to speak or move.
Elijah Accola's insight:

Marysue Grivna, A 10-year-old girl, has been paralyzed and has been unable to speak for a year, after taking a flu vaccine.  Her condition, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), was caused by an infection of the brain.  They believe that this infection was caused by a flu shot.  She now spends most of her time in a hospital bed at her house.  Her family is raising money so she can sleep in her room.  Doctor’s will not confirm or deny that her condition was caused by a flu shot.

 

The cumulative effects theory can be applied in this situation.  In 2008 a seventy five year old woman also went through the same situation after getting a vaccine to fight influenza.  The seventy-five- year-old woman passed away after being diagnosed.  Marysue experienced the same symptoms after getting a flu shot.

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South Korea’s Plastic Surgery Is In Trouble With Botched Patients And Dodgy Doctors - Breaking news around the worldBreaking news around the world

South Korea’s Plastic Surgery Is In Trouble With Botched Patients And Dodgy Doctors - Breaking news around the worldBreaking news around the world | Health and Medical PR | Scoop.it
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Alzheimer's disease: are we close to finding a cure?

Alzheimer's disease: are we close to finding a cure? | Health and Medical PR | Scoop.it
There seems to be more focus than ever on Alzheimer's research. But how close are scientists to developing effective prevention and treatment strategies for the disease?
Elijah Accola's insight:

Alzheimer’s disease is defined by Merriam- Webster Dictionary as a disease of the brain that causes people to slowly lose their memory and mental abilities as they grow older. 

 

Alzheimer’s disease hits close to home with me, my grandma has been diagnosed with it.  She is eighty-three years old.  Alzheimer’s is said to be a disease that hits people in a higher age bracket.  In the United States, Alzheimer’s affects around five million people aged sixty-five and older.

 

Along with Alzheimer’s, dementia is said to be a part of the symptoms that go along with the disease.  Worldwide, Alzheimer’s affects almost 36 million people.  It is considered the sixth largest cause of death.  Currently there is no cure for this disease.

 

Two abnormal brain structures and proteins, plaques and tangles, have been linked to Alzheimer’s disease.  The build up of proteins in between nerve cells and plaques, are known as beta-amyloid.  Tangles also know as tau, are twisted fibers of a protein, which build up inside of brain cells. These proteins build up a longtime before symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease are present.

 

According to Medical News Today, “increasing brain cell connections could reduce plaque accumulation”.

 

Alzheimer’s is the only cause of death in the top ten that there is no way of preventing.  Scientists and doctors are still working on finding a cure.

 

Plaques and tangles kill and damage brain structures.  Genes play a big role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease.  Genes can be passed on from generation to generation.

 

According to some tests Alzheimer’s disease can be inherited or passed on from a parent to an offspring.  Image tests can be used to show the development of abnormal proteins that build up in a living brain.  Research shows that there is hope to finding a cure.

 

In the past twenty years, scientists have discovered the beta-amyloid and tau proteins.  The FDA has approved a drug that helps with memory and thinking symptoms.

 

Dr. Laurie Ryan, Medical News Today, when finding effective treatments for Alzheimer’s say that there is hope in finding a cure.

 

With a lack of funding and volunteers, the process of finding a cure slows the progress. Donations and funding are required to do tests and trials.

 

"By volunteering for clinical trials, you are playing a more active role in your own health care, while also paving the way for better treatment options for people with Alzheimer's and other dementias."

 

All in all, scientists are working on finding a cure.  They hope to find one soon.

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Patients Screwed in Spine Surgery ‘Scam’

Patients Screwed in Spine Surgery ‘Scam’ | Health and Medical PR | Scoop.it
Spinal Solutions is accused of running a multimillion-dollar scam in spinal surgery hardware that could leave thousands in pain if their shoddy materials fail.
Elijah Accola's insight:

Some screws used to screw in back and neck braces in patients have been found to not be high quality "medical grade" titanium.  Uneven threads can cause the pieces to break.  Richard Walkers supply firm has been found to distribute these screws.  Company's have been knocking off his brand of screws.  The president of the company that counterfeited the screws, was living a life of luxury.  Doctors were bribed with money and gifts to use their screws.

 

Lawsuits have been filed against the company's that made the faulty screws.

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Woman lost legs because of LI hospital’s negligence, lawyer tells Brooklyn jury

Woman lost legs because of LI hospital’s negligence, lawyer tells Brooklyn jury | Health and Medical PR | Scoop.it
They took her legs and most of her hearing after botching a simple gynecological procedure — but lawyers for the prestigious Long Island hospital being sued for a young mother’s tragic circumstances told a jury she should be thankful for their lifesaving care.
Elijah Accola's insight:

Stacey had both of legs amputated and suffered from hearing loss after having her colon punctured.  She went in for a routine procedure when her colon was punctured.  This mishap caused an infection that spread to her legs.  Stacey went into cardiac arrest three times during her 73 days in the intensive care unit at the hospital.  She is suing the hospital for a multimillion dollar settlement for her pain and suffering.

 

Peter DeNoto, lawyer representing the hospital, stated that she should be glad to be alive.  

 

Stacey had her feet amputated at the ankles before they removed both of her legs at the knees.  Doctors believe that Stacey had a remarkable recover.  They also believe that the procedure saved her life.  In 2009 Stacey almost passed away as a result of blood poisoning and gangrene.  She went into cardiac arrest three times.

 

As a future public relations professional, I would first get both sides of the story and create a plan to deal with the situation.  As a public relations professional for the hospital, I would try to release a positive statement to the media before the situation gets out of my control.  After that I would use Twitter and other social media sites to keep people up to date on what is going on.  I would need to stay on top of things to be successful.  I would do everything I could to make light out of the situation.  The doctors did there job, and were able to save Stacey's life.  This thought would have to be successful and well communicated if I were put in front of a jury.

 

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Do colds increase the risk of stroke in children?

Do colds increase the risk of stroke in children? | Health and Medical PR | Scoop.it
A recent study suggests that there may be an elevated stroke risk for children during the few days after a minor infection such as a cold.
Elijah Accola's insight:

I still need to finish my response, its about at three hundred words:

A stroke is the leading cause of death in the United States of children, stated stroke.org.  It affects about six in every 100,000 children.  According to medicalnewstoday.com, Colds can be attributed to a stroke in both adults and children.

 

Merriam-Webster defines a stroke as a serious illness caused when a blood vessel in your brain suddenly breaks or is blocked.  A blood clot forms in the heart and travels to the brain.

 

Dr. Lars Marquardt, a professor at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, says "because conventional risk factors are less prevalent in children, inflammatory conditions may be more relevant contributors to stroke risk in children”.

 

The connection between inflammation and stroke in children needs to be studied more in depth. A risk factor includes congenital heart disease.  This can be associated to inflammation in younger children.

 

The database, Kaiser Pediatric Stroke Study, represents about 2.5 million children.  A study links a cold to arterial ischemic stroke (AIS).  The study found that of the 102 that had an arterial ischemic stroke, ten of the children had a doctor appointment within three days.  Researchers have found that within three days of a doctor visit, that the children with AIS were twelve times more likely to have had an infection.

 

Dr. Heather Fullerton said, "We've seen this increase in stroke risk from infection in adults, but until now, an association has not been studied in children. It is possible that inflammatory conditions contribute more to the stroke risk in children, however, further research is needed to explore this possible association."

 

Dr. Marquardt suggested that it "provides some interesting possibilities that are worth pursuing."

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