Hauntology
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Hauntology
All things hauntological, atemporal and future past nostalgic in music, media, art and ideas
Curated by Sean Albiez
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Forum 2016 : Simon Reynolds - Tomorrow Never Known: the unpredictable future of pop culture | European Lab Forum

European Lab forum 6e édition Europe de la culture : année zéro 4 — 8 mai 2016 Simon Reynolds - Tomorrow Never Know : Le futur imprévisible de la Po
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The Future Has Already Happened | Sam Kriss | Viewpoint Magazine

The Future Has Already Happened | Sam Kriss | Viewpoint Magazine | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'But the future has always been several: how could it be otherwise, when it hasn’t happened yet? The millennial or apocalyptic future, the future that abolishes time itself, is not the same as the prophetic future of a possible or desired outcome, which is not the same as speculative future of science fiction, which is not the same as the future envisaged by a calendar or a to-do list, which is not the same as the future of the high-yield bond, which is not the same as the future which will involve you reading the next sentence, or deciding not to. But what all these have in common with the phenomenological future – the one involved in the direct sensation of time passing, the thing that draws further out of reach the closer you get to it – is their slipperiness. Futures can never be touched or experienced, only imagined; this is why they’re as diverse as the human psyche, and why they tend to be so dreamlike: at turns ludic, libidinal, or monstrous.' - Sam Kriss
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No Ghost Appears: Luciano Chessa’s Reconstructions of the Futurist Intonarumori - Benjamin Lord

No Ghost Appears: Luciano Chessa’s Reconstructions of the Futurist Intonarumori - Benjamin Lord | Hauntology | Scoop.it

From 2010 - 'But it is not that “we are all Futurists now.” Quite the opposite, today everything must find some pre-built historical rack to hang on, which is Futurism’s very antithesis. The chief symptom of this historicist sequelmania is that any “political” valence is today identified and experienced as an insertion, as a figure on the monochrome ground of consensus reality, and not as part of the fabric of social exchange itself. Instead of art as a by-product of history, and as a necessary and embodied deposit of a form’s historically accrued relationship with its audience, we have a universe of pre-regulated meanings, programmatically fixed through scholarly administrative fiat, and a present that is being ventriloquized continually through the past. This strange hollowing out of the present is itself a political development. The risks and rewards of music lie as always in the dynamic between the audience and the work, at this moment caught in the scholastic temptations of an ascendant cult of history, and in the troubled and troubling “museumification” of sound, both of which cut against the only aspects of Futurism worth preserving for the constantly disappearing present.' - Benjamin Lord

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Nuclear Futurism - Liam Sprod || Zero Books ||

Nuclear Futurism - Liam Sprod || Zero Books || | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Starting from the end of history, the end of art and the failure of the future set out by such ends, Nuclear Futurism reinvigorates art, literature and philosophy through the unlikely alliance of hauntology and the Italian futurists.'

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What is at Stake in the Future? | Alex Williams & Nick Srnicek | DIS

What is at Stake in the Future? | Alex Williams & Nick Srnicek | DIS | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'As Lyotard’s epochal definition puts it, we have grown suspicious of the metanarrative, and in its wake historical teleology and even grand-scaled meaning-making have collapsed into an impossible to summarise plurality of fractured, partially overlapping micro-events. There is of course some truth to these claims, yet as we argue, Lyotard moves too quickly to dismiss the mass belief in ‘the future’ and the big picture trajectory. What has disappeared is faith in the future in the more depressing sense of a better future, while looming dystopian perspectives, of a future of hyper-neoliberalisation, rising surplus populations, and environmental catastrophe have become all-too ubiquitous. Key political signifiers such as ‘modernisation’, for example, have become almost entirely subsumed within a neoliberal framework. The modernisation of an industry, workplace, or pursuit, today indicates privatisation, contracting out, rising precarity and declining wages.' - Alex Williams & Nick Srnicek
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Accelerationism Without Accelerationism - Steven Shaviro (book review)

Steven Shaviro's review of Inventing the Future: Postcapitalism and a World Without Work (by Nick Srnicek and Alex Williams)

 

'The greatest strength of Inventing the Future, to my mind, is that it does indeed turn our attention towards the future, instead of the past. A big problem for the left today is that we have too long been stuck in the backward-looking, defensive project of trying to rescue whatever might be left of the mid-twentieth-century welfare state. While it is perfectly reasonable to lament our loss of the safety net that was provided by mid-twentieth-century social democracy, the restoration of those benefits is not enough to fuel a radical economic and political program. Looking nostalgically towards the past is far too deeply ingrained in our habits of thought. We need to reclaim our sense of the future from Silicon Valley and Hollywood. As Srnicek and Williams put it at the very end of their book,

 

"Rather than settling for marginal improvements in battery life and computing power, the left should mobilise dreams of decarbonising the economy, space travel, robot economies – all the traditional touchstones of science fiction – in order to prepare for a day beyond capitalism."

 

Post-capitalism (or better, communism – to use another word that is absent from this book) today has only a science fictional status. It’s a hidden potentiality that somehow still manages – just barely – to haunt the neoliberal endless present. Our rulers have been unable to exorcise this potential completely; but thus far we have been equally unable to endow it with any sort of substantiality or persistence. Inventing the Future looks beyond this impasse, to extrapolate (as all good science fiction does) a future that might actually be livable. This is its virtue and its importance.' - Steven Shaviro

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The Future After the End of the Economy | e-flux - Franco Berardi Bifo

The Future After the End of the Economy | e-flux - Franco Berardi Bifo | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Only if we are able to disentangle the future (the perception of the future, the concept of the future, and the very production of the future) from the traps of growth and investment will we find a way out of the vicious subjugation of life, wealth, and pleasure to the financial abstraction of semiocapital. The key to this disentanglement can be found in a new form of wisdom: harmonizing with exhaustion.

 

Exhaustion is a cursed word in the frame of modern culture, which is based on the cult of energy and the cult of male aggressiveness. But energy is fading in the postmodern world for many reasons that are easy to detect. Demographic trends reveal that, as life expectancy increases and birth rate decreases, mankind as a whole is growing old. This process of general aging produces a sense of exhaustion, and what was once considered a blessing—increased life expectancy—may become a misfortune if the myth of energy is not restrained and replaced with a myth of solidarity and compassion.

 

Energy is fading also because basic physical resources such as oil are doomed to extinction or dramatic depletion. And energy is fading because competition is stupid in the age of the general intellect. The general intellect is not based on juvenile impulse and male aggressiveness, on fighting, winning, and appropriation. It is based on cooperation and sharing.

 

This is why the future is over. We are living in a space that is beyond the future. If we come to terms with this post-futuristic condition, we can renounce accumulation and growth and be happy sharing the wealth that comes from past industrial labor and present collective intelligence.

 

If we cannot do this, we are doomed to live in a century of violence, misery, and war.' - Franco Berardi Bifo

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