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Creative Review - Have you been to Scarfolk?

Creative Review - Have you been to Scarfolk? | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Scarfolk is a town in the North West of England. Its precise location is not entirely clear, but we do know when it is: the town is in a perpetual, decade-long loop of the 1970s. Scarfolk Council recently opened its archives to the public and made available many artifacts at scarfolk.blogspot.co.uk: from public information posters to ice-cream advertisements to screenshots of TV programmes and films. There are also music and field recordings.

 

Certain themes resurface: the municipal, the occult, childhood and school days, totalitarianism and dystopia, memory and nostalgia, societal paranoia and fear of disease, television and radio' - Richard Littler

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Hauntology
All things hauntological, atemporal and future past nostalgic in music, media, art and ideas
Curated by Sean Albiez
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On Not Getting The Neoliberal Anti-Hero We Wanted: Blade Runner’s Play With Nostalgia | Jennifer Cook

On Not Getting The Neoliberal Anti-Hero We Wanted: Blade Runner’s Play With Nostalgia | Jennifer Cook | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Ridley Scott’s genre critique of the corrupt corporation had evolved since its 20th century take in the Alien franchise, expanding to consciously address our own implication in the techno-dystopian social narrative. It turns out that we are no longer universally laboring blue collar victims in the secretive horrors of impending biopolitical technocracy. Rather, we are eager and satiated participants in its isolating ubiquity; high tech consumers implicated in all of the attendant social stratification, inequality, and suffering that its warm glow of access masks and accelerates, from facilitated gentrification and casualized labor, to the toxic, extra-legal wastelands of dead electronics processing.' - Jennifer Cook

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"Ghost Stories" with Bruce Lincoln and Martha Lincoln - Franklin Humanities Institute | November 2 - 3, 2017 | Duke University

"Ghost Stories" with Bruce Lincoln and Martha Lincoln - Franklin Humanities Institute | November 2 - 3, 2017 | Duke University | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'History and the humanities confront a troubling truth: that the present is the product of past events, but much of the past is unavailable, either accidentally or by design. In attempting to rationalize the present, we are frequently confronted by pasts that are not only ‘difficult’ for their traumatic legacies, but also epistemologically indeterminate. As a result, efforts to write the history of the present are shot through with uncanniness: unexplained causalities, mysterious antecedents, and contradictory accounts. 

Difficult histories pose an additional difficulty: In the interstices between the part of the past that is known and the part which is unknown lies all that is half-known, intuited, suspected, repressed, fantasized, demonized and embellished. Episodes that are difficult to resolve and reconstruct are often troubling, and may be experienced as ghostly, conspiratorial, and haunted.'
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Is Post-Modernism to Blame for our Post-Truth World? | LSE Podcasts

Speaker(s): Professor Mark Currie, Dr Alison Gibbons, Professor James Ladyman, Hilary Lawson | Did Derrida make us do it? 


Is our current situation the inevitable outcome of the intellectual adventuring of the twentieth century that critiqued grand narratives and challenged absolute truths? Or should we call upon the critical scepticism of post-modernism and post-structuralism with renewed vigour, to better see through the smoke and mirrors of contemporary culture? We ask what the relationship is between facts, alternative facts, and fiction, and explore the precarious status of truth in the twenty-first century.

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The Overlook Hotel: David Leo Rice On a Post-Human Earth | The Believer | David Leo Rice

The Overlook Hotel: David Leo Rice On a Post-Human Earth | The Believer | David Leo Rice | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'In The Shining, the Overlook is even more alienating in that it’s an off-season hotel, devoid of guests. Despite this fact, after settling into the premises for what initially seems to be the first time, Jack Torrance tells his wife that he’s “never been this happy or comfortable anywhere.” As the late theorist and music critic Mark Fisher puts it in his essay collection Ghosts of My Life (2014), “Even before he enters the Overlook, Jack is fleeing his ghosts. And the horror, the absolute horror, is that he—haunter and haunted—flees to the place where they are waiting. Such is The Shining’s pitiless fatality… ' - David Leo Rice

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Witches' Halloween Brew, by Burning Witches Records

Witches' Halloween Brew by Burning Witches Records, released 25 August 2017

1. Xander Harris - Burn Slow
2. Pye Corner Audio - Forbidden Scenario 5
3. Joel Grind - A Face In The Fog
4. Wojciech Golczewski - Get Out
5. Repeated Viewing - Dawn
6. BurningTapes - Kiva
7. Ian Alex Mac - The Homecoming
8. Espectrostatic - The Doom That Came To Marble Town
9. Thomas Ragsdale - Credo
10. All of Them Witches - Return Of The Witch
11. Graham Reznick - Hexagram
12. Moon Gangs - Dressed In Red
13. Timothy Fife - Polykinesis
14. Deathcount In Silicon Valley - Leather Death
15. Steve Nolan - Birth
16. Steve Greene - Noir, City Streets and Macabre Pt.1
17. DIE HEXEN - Haunt
18. Kreng - Jurkje
19. MAINE - Theme

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HAUNTOLOGY: the GHOST BOX label (Frieze, 2005) | Simon Reynolds

HAUNTOLOGY: the GHOST BOX label (Frieze, 2005) | Simon Reynolds | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'HAUNTOLOGY: the GHOST BOX label (original title) (published under the Frieze-chosen title of "Spirit of Preservation") Frieze, October 2005'
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Folk horror, a history: from The Wicker Man to The League of Gentlemen | New Statesman

Folk horror, a history: from The Wicker Man to The League of Gentlemen | New Statesman | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Scovell, who writes essays for the British Film Institute and has collaborated on films with the landscape writer Robert Macfarlane, is a keen-eyed and enthusiastic curator, his tone perfectly pitched between that of the articulate academic and the box-set binger. He knows that folk horror provides succour as well as visceral thrills and draws clear links between topography, rurality and emerging “hauntology” theory. He spawns new terms, too, such as “eso-erotic” for sexual subtexts, or “occultivation” for those dark works concerned with the violence that arises when old agricultural ways are challenged by “progress”. 

Consideration is rightly afforded to such films as David Gladwell’s moving Requiem for a Village (1975), in which a Suffolk village is consumed by suburbia, and whose dead literally rise in defiance, as well as the many BBC adaptations of M R James’s ghost stories and the man-as-meddler dramas of Nigel Kneale. Foreign directors see Britain with fresh eyes: Jerzy Skolimowski’s The Shout (1978) and Roman Polanski’s Northumberland-set Cul-de-Sac (1966) are two psycho-landscape masterworks. 

What emerges is the notion of a body of work concerned with conflict – between past and present, religious and atheist, physical and spiritual. Folk horror represents a fear of being governed by outside forces while exploring identity confusion.' - Ben Myers
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Music Review: Klein - Tommy | Tiny Mix Tapes

Music Review: Klein - Tommy | Tiny Mix Tapes | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Klein’s overall production treatment has a special sound, somehow smooth but always on the verge of clipping — or not clipping, but “clipped.” You can hear digital snips and cuts pockmarked like scars on the audio material. A spectrum of glistening rainbow CD hues smeared onto asphalt grain, Tommy is introspective, chill, and tense, with a relentless buzz that recalls DJ Escrow’s wily digital noise, chilled by the concrète field recording timbre of the Macintosh microphone. The spectral, thinned-out, wraith-like sounds render her soulful voice taut, without the grime MC’s live fidelity, a layering move that abandons Mark Fischer’s assessment of Afro-futurism and Hauntology in favor of pure entanglement, the haunting of the now, the demonology of our intricacy. The result is a diffuse masterclass into the psyche of a liberated musician’s workflow that is actually experimental in its affects, its tactics, its textures.' - Nick James Scavo
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Alessandro Cortini - AVANTI | Boomkat

Alessandro Cortini - AVANTI | Boomkat | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Avanti is Alessandro Cortini’s sixth album and his hauntological magnum opus; a masterful embodiment of his nostalgia for analog synth recordings wrapped up in a pall of decaying futurism. After numerous Forse volumes, a pair of LPs for Hospital Productions, a live recording tape and a collaboration with Merzbow, we’d wager that Avanti is the most substantial Cortini album to date. In a Leyland Kirby/The Caretaker-esque gesture, Avanti investigates notions of memory surrounding music. Taking a time-capsule of old home movies made by his grandfather as a “perfect fossil of his childhood”, the NIN synthesist turns those cues into signature, billowing structures generated from the EMS Synthi AKS, resulting a record that is sore with a certain ‘hiraeth’, ‘saudade’ or ‘sehnsucht’ for a past which he comes to terms with in viscerally romantic style.' - Boomkat
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Ghosts of Saracen by rorypeace

Ghosts of Saracen by rorypeace | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'There are ghosts all around us: from the past, bleeding into the present and worrying our future. In this dissertation we explore Derrida’s theory of hauntology and its applications in archaeology. Drawing upon various case-studies, we discover that ghosts can be identified through mixed approaches – excavation, memory, material traces and walking. We then propose to merge these enactments into a radical methodology of hauntology, choosing the Saracen Foundry as our site of inquiry. This game represents phenomenology, audio, walking and non-linearity are practiced and then transcribed into an audio-visual environment in Twine, a creative-narrative engine. The final result is a fully-realized phenomenological user-interface, wherein persons can navigate between related Saracen Foundry sites, and conjure up revenants for their own speculation.' - Rory Peace
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Interview: Grant Gee + James Leyland Kirby (The Caretaker) on W.G. Sebald + Hauntology  | Celluloid Wicker Man

Interview: Grant Gee + James Leyland Kirby (The Caretaker) on W.G. Sebald + Hauntology  | Celluloid Wicker Man | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'For a recent symposium on Hauntology, I gave a paper on the links between the philosophy of hauntological ideas with the work and W.G. Sebald. The subject had been interesting me for a while, not least because the jump between the style of the former and the thematic ideas of the latter are the amalgamation that I’m currently aiming for in my own fiction writing. To make this connection in the presentation, I used the example of the musical score in Grant Gee’s documentary, Patience (After Sebald) (2012) as a pivot for the analysis as well as overt reference to Hauntology’s key writer (in its guise within the arts), Mark Fisher. To aid the research, I tracked down both Gee and the film’s composer, The Caretaker (James Leyland Kirby).' - Adam Scovell
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Dispatches: London | Frieze | Juliet Jacques

Dispatches: London | Frieze | Juliet Jacques | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'One week after the election result was announced, I went to a gathering that Laura Oldfield Ford had organized. I hadn’t seen Laura since the memorial event for Mark Fisher in February, when we had agreed that those of us who had coalesced through the blogging circle around k-punk, or Zero/Repeater Books should meet more often. With so many emotions flying around, and so many variables at play, it was impossible to guess what Mark would have made of the preceding seven days, in which the end of capitalist realism began to feel not just possible but almost inevitable. In truth, I have no idea which way things are going to fall, but being part of a more confident alliance of politicians, activists, artists and writers, I feel for the first time in my life that it might be possible to push this city – and this country – back towards the left.' - Juliet Jacques
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Ether Signposts #27/52a: Further Signals From A Julian House Archive | A Year In The Country

Ether Signposts #27/52a: Further Signals From A Julian House Archive | A Year In The Country | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'I’ve briefly mentioned the The House Of Julian Flikr group that collects Julian House’s artwork and design work before… Though I don’t visit it all that often (it’s not actually updated all that often, which I quite like as you’re not running to catch up with it) but it’s always a treat to do so when I do… …and I thought it would be good to revisit around these parts… I think it’s probably the best display/collection of his work that I have come across and includes his work for the Ghost Box Records label he co-founded with Jim Jupp, interconnected work with/for Broadcast, his design work for clients via Intro (book covers, records etc) and some exhibition work and photographs.' - A Year in the Country
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From Stranger Things to IT, why do we love TV shows from the Eighties so much | David Barnett

From Stranger Things to IT, why do we love TV shows from the Eighties so much | David Barnett | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Nostalgia is a powerful weapon in the battle for ratings, and the Eighties is a particularly hard-fought territory. Which is a curious thing, because most of us who lived through it don’t particularly remember it being that great. But then, perhaps that’s sort of the point.' - David Barnett
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An Evening with D.A.P (Dmitri Aleksandrovich Prigov): A Phantom Broadcast | Tuesday 14th November

An Evening with D.A.P (Dmitri Aleksandrovich Prigov): A Phantom Broadcast | Tuesday 14th November | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'An Evening with D.A.P (Dmitri Aleksandrovich Prigov): A Phantom Broadcast is both a sound séance, and “an active homage of hauntology” that connects places and people, times and spaces, uncanny sounds and disembodied voices.

Richard Crow [is an] inter-disciplinary artist, working in the field of experimental audio research and performance, with an MA in Sonic Arts from Middlesex University (2006). Crow manifests sound and noise for its disruptive, visceral and affective qualities and its psycho-physical implications for the listener. His solo and collaborative performances have consisted of highly conceptualised interventions into base materiality, investigations of alternative systems of organisation and research into a certain material decadence, most notably with the project The Institution of Rot.'
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British Folk Horror Is Back, and It's Scarier Than Ever | Vice | Crystal Ponti

British Folk Horror Is Back, and It's Scarier Than Ever | Vice | Crystal Ponti | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Even with a label, what constitutes folk horror is somewhat subjective. "This is surprisingly tricky, but essentially it's a subgenre of horror media that often deals with landscape, belief, folklore, superstition, and the supernatural in various mixes," said Adam Scovell, filmmaker and author of Folk Horror: Hours Dreadful and Things Strange. It usually portrays clashes of belief systems, but blurs the line between which order is the moral superior: cult or so-called mainstream.' - Crystal Ponti

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Why Burial’s Untrue Is the Most Important Electronic Album of the Century So Far | Simon Reynolds

Why Burial’s Untrue Is the Most Important Electronic Album of the Century So Far | Simon Reynolds | Hauntology | Scoop.it
Delving into the politics, emotion, and musical history behind the disquieting masterwork a decade after its release.
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Twin Peaks: Dead destinies are still alive | Matheus Borges | Medium

Twin Peaks: Dead destinies are still alive | Matheus Borges | Medium | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'In his book ‘Ghosts of My Life’ (Zero Books, 2014), Mark Fisher explores the term ‘hauntology.’ It’s a pun/concept (‘puncept’, suggests Fisher) coined by Jacques Derrida from the words ‘haunt’ and ‘ontology’ (the philosophical study of what can be said to exist). For Derrida, ‘to haunt does not mean to be present’. Fisher writes, ‘Everything that exists is possible only on the basis of a whole series of absences, which precede it and surround it, allowing it to possess the consistency and intelligibility that it does.’ ‘Hauntology,’ therefore, is the study of absences that exist. It is the observation of virtuality acting on reality. And there is nothing supernatural about this realm of existence. Haunting here is a metaphor, signaling something that exists only by not being there. According to Fisher, hauntological art and culture evoke past ages, but unlike nostalgia and pastiche, they refuse to abandon an intrinsic desire for the future, or for a different future. Fisher’s book is a careful study of hauntology and how it manifests in popular culture, methodologically and formally.' - Matheus Borges.
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Tanizaki - Archaeology | Review | Nathan Ford

Tanizaki - Archaeology | Review | Nathan Ford | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'It's not totally unheard of for acoustic guitars to be used in the hauntology genre - both The Advisory Circle and Belbury Poly have dabbled and used them for colouring before - but it's unusual to hear them given such prominence. There's long been a relationship between pagan folk music and hauntology and it's addressed very nicely here. Tanizaki describes it best when he calls his music 'weird nature music', a description that could be taken a number of ways but conjures a very specific sound in my mind, almost a hauntological 'thin wild mercury sound'.' - Nathan Ford

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Pye Corner Audio Fills The Space Between Dance Music and Horror Soundtracks | Bandcamp

Pye Corner Audio Fills The Space Between Dance Music and Horror Soundtracks | Bandcamp | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'The U.K.-based electronic musician has, over a number of years, constructed a mysterious world around a series of different monikers and limited releases on various labels, with Pye Corner Audio being the most prolific. Beginning in 2010 with the self-released three volumes of the Black Mill Tapes, he has since recorded full-length albums on U.K. label Ghost Box—which tagged him as “hauntology”—and the Vancouver-based More Than Human, along with a smattering of EPs and 7-inches.' - Bandcamp
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Amplification//Annihilation (recorded live at Cafe Oto August 20th, 2017)

Amplification//Annihilation (recorded live at Cafe Oto August 20th, 2017) | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Sonic representation of ecological crisis is not reducible to changing ideas of the natural, though crisis is nonetheless discernible in growing suspicion of ideals of authenticity. At the same time, the contemporary prominence of field recording as musical accessory or as a genre in itself, implies further permutations. Equally, existential experience of ecological and economic collapse is discernible in British Industrial or Detroit techno’s confrontation with deindustrialisation and thus globalisation, New Orleans MCs; tales of negotiating FEMA flood relief, metal’s black forests, or all those musical expressions of loss and forfeiture usefully called ‘hauntological’. At the very least, these betray a changing experience of what is natural and the assorted ways that experience is lived.' - Paul Rekret
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Music industry should work together to protect new and niche artists | Sally-Ann Gross | M Magazine

Music industry should work together to protect new and niche artists | Sally-Ann Gross | M Magazine | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'To recognise something, we need to see, know or sense what we are hearing. The discovery playlists and streaming platforms that provide endless seamless music in a theme do so in the same way as the exhibition Time is Out of Joint. They are not necessarily a new exciting place of discovery but a place where the difference of histories has been removed, stripped away and reduced. The elements become dislocated signifiers floating like digital detritus, which need resituating to breathe new life into them, to be recycled for future use. 

That’s what hip-hop did so well, but as Simon Reynolds pointed out in his book Retromania, this dislocation has caused the music industry to go into reconnection overdrive as it increasingly recycles previous music styles and vies for consumer’s attention.' - Sally-Ann Gross
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Metamodernism-Historicity-Affect-and-Depth-after-Postmodernism | Rowan and Littlefield

Metamodernism-Historicity-Affect-and-Depth-after-Postmodernism | Rowan and Littlefield | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Metamodernism: Historicity, Affect, Depth brings together many of the most influential voices in the scholarly and critical debate about post-postmodernism and twenty-first century aesthetics, arts and culture. By relating cutting-edge analyses of contemporary literature, the visual arts and film and television to recent social, technological and economic developments, the volume provides both a map and an itinerary of today’s metamodern cultural landscape. As its organising principle, the book takes Fredric Jameson’s canonical arguments about the waning of historicity, affect and depth in the postmodern culture of western capitalist societies in the twentieth century, and re-evaluates and reconceptualises these notions in a twenty-first century context. In doing so, it shows that the contemporary moment should be regarded as a transitional period from the postmodern and into the metamodern cultural moment.' - Rowan and Littlefield
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Haunting History: For a Deconstructive Approach to the Past | Ethan Kleinberg | Stanford University Press

Haunting History: For a Deconstructive Approach to the Past | Ethan Kleinberg | Stanford University Press | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'This book argues for a deconstructive approach to the practice and writing of history at a moment when available forms for writing and publishing history are undergoing radical transformation. To do so, it explores the legacy and impact of deconstruction on American historical work; the current fetishization of lived experience, materialism, and the real; new trends in philosophy of history; and the persistence of ontological realism as the dominant mode of thought for conventional historians. 


Arguing that this ontological realist mode of thinking is reinforced by current analog publishing practices, Ethan Kleinberg advocates for a hauntological approach to history that follows the work of Jacques Derrida and embraces a past that is at once present and absent, available and restricted, rather than a fixed and static snapshot of a moment in time. This polysemic understanding of the past as multiple and conflicting, he maintains, is what makes the deconstructive approach to the past particularly well suited to new digital forms of historical writing and presentation.'

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Robin Hardy, The Wicker Man and Folk Horror | James Gent / We Are Cult

Robin Hardy, The Wicker Man and Folk Horror | James Gent / We Are Cult | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Everything you see in the film is absolutely authentic. The whole series of ceremonies and details that we show have happened at different times and places in Britain and western Europe. What we did was to bring them all together in one particular time and place. The wicker man itself is quite real. The Druids used the structure to burn their sacrificial victims. What we hoped would fascinate people is not that they would think these things are still going on in Europe, but that they would recognise an awful lot of these things as sort of little echoes from either out of childhood stories and nursery rhymes or things they do at various times of the year. There are so many Christian holidays that are celebrated where there was previously a pagan feast. Easter is one of them, originally it was a hare feast. At Christmas, you set up a Christmas tree because that was what the goddess Hera worshipped. Mistletoe is purely Druidic – it relates to the Golden Bough. My God, when you decorate your home for Christmas you are using nearly every pagan symbol there is!' - Robin Hardy

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