Hauntology
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Hacker Farm - UHF

Hacker Farm - UHF | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Hacker Farm have managed to create something that feels genuinely different and odd and exciting for anyone who likes a bit of mystery' - Ian Maleney gets all hauntological on us.
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Hauntology
All things hauntological, atemporal and future past nostalgic in music, media, art and ideas - from 3rd April 2018, new posts and updates will be available at a new Hauntology blog - https://hauntology.wixsite.com/hauntology - the current intention is to leave this site as it is as an archive of developments in hauntology from 2004-2018
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Hauntology - The Presence of the Past in Twenty-First Century English Literature | Katy Shaw | Palgrave Macmillan

Hauntology - The Presence of the Past in Twenty-First Century English Literature | Katy Shaw | Palgrave Macmillan | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Harnessing hauntology as a lens through which to consider the specters haunting twenty-first century English writings, this Pivot examines the emergence of a vein of hauntological literature that profiles the pervasive presence of the past in our new millennium.'
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I Started Wearing Black | Sonae

'The term hauntology shares a fate with retro-futurism when it comes to inflationary overuse and abuse. It's a conceptual container that looks good and can hold a lot, indeed, too much. Furthermore, hauntology has its peak season behind it; a term on the threshold of its expiration date. Nevertheless, I would like to rehabilitate hauntology and use it properly to characterize “I Started Wearing Black”, because the term is rarely as compelling to describe music as is the case here.' - Klaus Walter

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ANNE GUTHRIE - Brass Orchids | boomkat

ANNE GUTHRIE - Brass Orchids | boomkat | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Including "posthumous contributions from the artist's grandfather, a jazz pianist; obsolete media palimpsests (some vanity, some necessity); tap dancing on a peeling floor…” there’s something almost disturbing about the personal narrative on display here, as the label describe it…”an unsettling and strangely beautiful album - akin to something on the tip of your tongue, which, before you can name it, slips away into forgetting”.' - boomkat
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Psychogeography, Hauntology and Sonic Exploration: An interview with Drew Mulholland | John Pritchard

John Pritchard interviews Drew Mulholland
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Troubling time/s and ecologies of nothingness: re-turning, re-membering, and facing the incalculable | Karen Barad

Troubling time/s and ecologies of nothingness: re-turning, re-membering, and facing the incalculable | Karen Barad | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Against its Newtonian interpretation as the absence of matter and energy, as that which does not matter and thus works to justify colonial occupation, Barad understands the void in terms of Derrida’s hauntology; a spectral domain where life and death are originarily entangled, and inanimate matter itself gives itself to be thought in its mortal finitude. The void is rather the yearning and the imagining of what might yet have been, and thus also the infinitely rich ground of imagining possibilities for living and dying otherwise.' - 
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Notes on re-enchantment as resistance in Deep England | Paul Watson

Notes on re-enchantment as resistance in Deep England | Paul Watson | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'The word hauntology was the overused word du jour on certain websites and newsletters in the first decade of the 21st Century, but its use in those quarters seemed to decline after it got picked up by mainstream media around 2011 (even though it never became a popular mainstream concept). 

 Hauntology now tends to be snarkily summed up as where’s my flying car/jet pack: the ghost of the unrealised future of mainstream 1940s/50s science fiction haunting the present; the failure to deliver the chrome-plated space age future we were told would be ours by the 21st Century. 

But, moving back to the point in question, I think this particular ghost of a lost future is born of 1970s post-hippy TV (and here, despite what I wrote about music earlier, there are some obvious ties with the unheimlich elements of British children’s TV of the 70s) followed by an adolescence of post-punk music, rather than the failed arrival of the futures promised in the 1940s/50s.' - Paul Watson
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Mixing it: Experiments in Digital Social Research | Centre for Interdisciplinary Methodologies | University of Warwick

'For hybrid methods: Internet-mediated musics, the social and the historical 

Georgina Born (Oxford) and Christopher Haworth (Birmingham) 

This presentation draws on a series of papers in which, through a study of five prominent popular and cross-over music genres spanning the period from the late 1990s to the present, we examine how the internet is transforming musical practices. The genres are microsound, hauntology, hypnagogic pop, chillwave and vaporwave. Analysing the internet-based practices associated with the five genres -- and doing this in relation to their offline manifestations -- poses both methodological and theoretical challenges. It requires new research tools attentive to the online practices involved in their creation and reception.'
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The Time Is Kernow: Gwenno’s Le Kov | The Quietus

The Time Is Kernow: Gwenno’s Le Kov | The Quietus | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'‘Jynn-amontya’ is a stunning love song to a computer, with hints of ambivalence about our modern symbiosis with technology. ‘Eus Keus?’ (which translates literally to ‘Is there cheese?’ – one of the oldest traditional sayings in the Cornish language, apparently) is a fierce call to launch ourselves into the stratosphere, to transcend the mundane. ‘Daromres y'n Howl’ (Traffic In The Sun) is like a groovy sub-aquatic Cate Le Bon jam drenched in the charming and disorienting spirit of early psych experimentalists The United States Of America, with dissonant sonic layers and bewitching hushes to complement the onomatopoeic traffic noise. And it has a guest rap from Gruff Rhys. ‘Tir Ha Mor’ (Land And Sea) is a kaleidoscope of gorgeous melodies under the firm command of propulsive rhythms: a crystalline sonic portrayal of memory as inner geography (in Chris Marker’s sense).' - Danijela Bočev

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Shock World Service (Podcast) by Shock World Service

'Misery with an optimistic echo since 2007 – A sound clash & sound collage. Music & spoken word interwoven with sounds & dialogue recorded around the city. Best suited for long train journeys or flights, ideally late at night & played loudly on headphones.' - Shock World Service
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Radio 4 - Happy Days - The Children of the Stones

Radio 4 - Happy Days - The Children of the Stones | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Writer and comedian Stewart Lee explores the ground breaking television series Children of the Stones and examines its special place in the memories of those children who watched it on its initial transmission in a state of excitement and terror.'
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`Unburied’ – Folk Horror takes centre stage | Folk Horror Revival

`Unburied’ – Folk Horror takes centre stage | Folk Horror Revival | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'In 1978, HTV produced a six-part children’s Folk Horror serial called ‘Unburied’. The tapes are now missing, presumed destroyed. In the subsequent decades, its existence has become the stuff of myth. But as its 40th anniversary approaches, it’s time to dig up what little information we have on this enigmatic footnote in television history.

Join Folk Horror enthusiast, Carrie Marx, as she conducts a personal investigation into the cracks in our collective memory. Beginning with a study of British television classics such as ‘Children of the Stones’, ‘The Owl Service’, and ‘Doctor Who’, Marx leaves no stone unturned as she unearths a terrifying mystery, buried in our cultural past.'
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Paper Dollhouse: The Sky Looks Different Here | Inverted Audio review

Paper Dollhouse: The Sky Looks Different Here | Inverted Audio review | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Throughout, the music floats between hauntological stupor and a pure, ethereal pop melodicism. The thick reverbs and swells of sound mean the songs often feel weighed down by the psychic pressure of information saturation. While the likes of Grouper or the Caretaker appear determined to hide from this pressure in a blanket of sentimental textures, Paper Dollhouse are reaching out to peer through the cracks in the echo chamber.' - Inverted Audio
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The Archiveologists - Series 1: 1. A Library in Action | BBC

The Archiveologists - Series 1: 1. A Library in Action | BBC | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Diane Morgan and Joe Wilkinson parody a 1970s documentary about Luton Library'

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Hawksmoor | Fluid Radio

Hawksmoor | Fluid Radio | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Hawksmoor’s mysterious cartography slinks underneath the city of London, linking six Hawksmoor churches. Using hauntology as a preferred weapon of choice, the music seeps out of ancient stones, its retro-faded synths discolouring the surroundings and bringing out a sickly-pale image of the past.' - James Catchpole

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“In Rotation: Natalie Evans, The Nightcrawlers, Slow Meadow, Chad Valley” | Opus

'Evoking German kosmische artists like Tangerine Dream and Cluster, The Nightcrawler’s music is pretty trippy, with a lo-fi nature full of charm and weirdness. With organ-like tones and satellite bleeps, “Beckoning Beacon” could be the score to a long-lost sci-fi movie while “Crystal Loop III” and “Transsonic” predate Ghost Box’s hauntology and the current synthwave crop, respectively. Meanwhile, “Baba Yaga’s Flight” evokes the BBC Radiophonic Workshop’s old school Doctor Who work, though it dives deeper into the Untempered Schism.' - Opus
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Rethinking Mythogeography | Phil Smith

Rethinking Mythogeography | Phil Smith | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Since 1998 , Phil Smith's ‘mythogeography’ has developed as a paranoid, exploratory, detective-like approach to space and place. It has prioritised anomalies and ‘in-betweeness’, working in gaps, extolling ‘voids’, and constructing general ideas from the ‘and and and’ of the accumulation and assemblage of disparate parts. It has also given attention to patterns, assuming such patterns to be an emergent meaning in themselves. Part of that attention to patterns has been a careful attempt to use ‘limited myth’ - myth-like accounts that are capable of symbolically representing patterns (e.g. of power or cultural paradigms) but are rendered questionable by their pop-cultural exploitation, blatant fiction or absurdity. Since 2010, when Phil Smith's book Mythogeography was published, the thinking and practice surrounding psychogeography, mythogeography and radical walking have moved on significantly. This book is a 2018 upgrade - an update for anyone interested in the subject . It consist of an essay by Phil and photographs by John Schott taken during Phil's recent invitation to be Artist-in-Residence at Carleton College, Northfield​, Minnesota.' - Triarchy Press

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Issue 3: Fearful Sounds: Cross-Platform Studies of Sonic Audio and Horror, Guest Editor: Danielle Barrios-O’Neill (Falmouth University) | Revenant

'This special issue of Revenant is dedicated to reflection on the relationships between sound and fear, aurality and horror, the audio experience and the supernatural. The ‘cross-platform’ element of this issue describes the variety of linked and overlapping channels and interfaces through which performances of sound arrive to us now: on the radio, streaming on the internet, or in the cinema. Each of the essays and creative pieces here situates the phenomenon of performed sound within a medial landscape now defined by the crossing of boundaries, so that ‘cross-platform’ refers not just to boundaries between media platforms, but also to associated boundaries between digital and analogue, local, national and global. That liminal space between categories or territories, the borderlands of culture, is where much of horror takes place, because its essential feature is interfacing with the unknown. Indeed many of the best scary stories, and many of the pieces here, engage the special terror that hinges on the unknown, as evoked by sound: sounds whose origins we cannot place; the creak on the stairs when the house should be empty; the voice in the dark.' - Danielle Barrios-O'Neill
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The Ghosts of Empty Moments | Weird Fiction Review | Christopher Burke

The Ghosts of Empty Moments | Weird Fiction Review | Christopher Burke | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'The collection’s subtitle is the deceptively unspecific, “Stories of Ghosts,” and ghosts in their most elusive sense are indeed a unifying element of the collection. They’re not always the remnants of humans or other creatures that were once living, however. Sometimes ghosts are architectures and pathways that have been or will be abandoned, hints of ideas yet to be breathed into life but which have a preternatural ability to be articulated, strange loops whose antecedents can never be traced, rootless leftovers of a deconstructed subject-object ourobouros. The devil is in the details, as a brief flash of an image might show up that harkens to a prior story, expanding the world of each through allusion and serving to recontextualize events in profound ways. Harrison consistently bends his prose style in service of confounding the subject-object relationship and holding a microscope to the uncertainties that come of it. Passive voice, second-person, deliberately ambiguous referents, all are used effectively to tell tales whose effect is not only that of unsettlement but also sympathy, not merely strange but also familiar.' - Christopher Burke

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The World Made Flat: The Logocentric Left and the Politics of Provocation | Areo

The World Made Flat: The Logocentric Left and the Politics of Provocation | Areo | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Desire for knowledge aims forward. Nostalgia longs backwardly. How do we conflate the two? We do it with words. Write them down, evoke, in Derrida’s terms, all the trace absences, supplement some, measure the differance, and a hauntology is born: a theoretical frame in which unintended subtractions and additions of meaning — the uncontrollable implications of language — shadow every word we speak with the ghost of every word already spoken and every word we cannot find.' - A. Jay Adler
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Kepla & DeForrest Brown Jr. - Absent Personae [PTP2005]

''Absent Personae' is a collaboration between Liverpool-based sound artist, Jon Davies aka Kepla, and New York-based media theorist and music writer, DeForrest Brown Jr. Following in the style of verbatim theater, Brown – through private recordings in various urban public environments – recalls a palpable though unseen trauma while wading amidst Davies’ digital processing of found social media audio. The result is a psychopolitical meditation on Black America as a (de)territorialized subject. 

 'Absent Personae' was commissioned by Electronic Voice Phenomena as an interstitial spectre in transition, resonating with the sinister politics of pseudo-science histories, while speculating on identity as evasion and persona without orientation. 

The piece is a post-industrial Dérive considering the psychological liminal zones between old and new industry and urbanity, the changing landscapes of labor: a fractured genealogical memory trace obscured by intercepted signals and the liquidating flux of late capitalism.' - PTP
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Straw X Geng - Retrovertigo (mix) by PTP

'Straw & Geng's favorite video game save room and pause/title screen themes. Sink right in.'
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A Year in the Country: Wandering Through Spectral Fields book

A Year in the Country: Wandering Through Spectral Fields book | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'A Year In The Country is a set of year-long journeys through spectral fields; cyclical explorations of an otherly pastoralism, the outer reaches of folk culture and the spectres of hauntology. It is a wandering amongst subculture that draws from the undergrowth of the land ... In keeping with the number of weeks in a year, the book is split into 52 chapters which draw together revised writings from the project alongside new journeyings. Connecting layered and, at times, semi-hidden cultural pathways and signposts, it journeys from acid folk to edgelands via electronic music innovators, folkloric film and photography, dreams of lost futures and misremembered televisual tales and transmissions.'
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An Interview With Si Begg - Hauntology | Zero-G

Garrick Wareham talks to Si Begg about his latest release - Hauntology: Organic Electronica. https://zero-g.co.uk/products/hauntology

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Zero-G releases Hauntology sample library by Si Begg | Rekkerd.org

Zero-G releases Hauntology sample library by Si Begg | Rekkerd.org | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'The aim of this library was to make a range of usable tools that could create the electronic sounds I heard and loved as a kid. Whether it be the quirky off-beat bleeps and bloops of Delia Derbyshire at the BBC Radiophonic Workshop, the dystopian soundscapes of John Carpenter or the early film scores by the likes of Tangerine Dream, these are the sounds that soundtracked many of my favourite films and TV shows, scaring and delighting me in equal measure.' - Si Begg

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RETROMANIA: an interview with Time of Culture - about "culture-time" | Simon Reynolds

RETROMANIA: an interview with Time of Culture - about "culture-time" | Simon Reynolds | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'I’m not sure “retromania” is a concept, really. It’s a word I used a title for the book - and I settled on it towards the end of the writing process, after having failed to come up with a title I preferred! In the end I think it was the right title, though. I see ‘retromania’ not as a concept or a theory but as an open-ended evocative term for a bunch of phenomena to do with retro, vintage, nostalgia, revivalism, curatorial aesthetics, commemorative culture, collecting, reissuing, etc . These phenomena are related and intermeshed but they also have their own discrete trajectories and specific determinants, and they can each be traced back in history a good way (in some cases several decades, if not longer). But the convergence of these tendencies in the first decade of the 21st Century adds up to a cultural landscape that seems to deserve a term like “retromania”. It’s a good ambivalent word for the overall mood of the culture. For a condition that could be seen as a malaise, but also as something distinctive and defining of our time, with aspects that are exciting and culturally productive.' - Simon Reynolds

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