Hauntology
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The Sound of Ruins: Sigur Rós’ Heima and the Post-Rock Elegy for Place | Interference

The Sound of Ruins: Sigur Rós’ Heima and the Post-Rock Elegy for Place | Interference | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Amongst the ways in which it maps out the geographical imagination of place, music plays a unique role in the formation and reformation of spatial memories, connecting to and reviving alternative times and places latent within a particular environment. Post-rock epitomises this: understood as a kind of negative space, the genre acts as an elegy for and symbolic reconstruction of the spatial erasures of late capitalism. After outlining how post-rock’s accommodation of urban atmosphere into its sonic textures enables an ‘auditory drift’ that orients listeners to the city’s fragments, the article’s first case study considers how formative Canadian post-rock acts develop this concrete practice into the musical staging of urban ruin. Turning to Sigur Rós, the article challenges the assumption that this Icelandic quartet’s music simply evokes the untouched natural beauty of their homeland, through a critical reading of the 2007 tour documentary Heima. A closer reading of the band’s audiovisual practice reveals a counter-geography of Iceland, in which the country’s decaying industrial past is excavated and its more recent ecological failures are accounted for. As with post-rock more generally, this proposes a more complex relationship between music, place and memory than that offered by notions of reflection and nostalgia, which instead emerges as a melancholic mourning for spatial pasts.' - Lawson Fletcher

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Hauntology
All things hauntological, atemporal and future past nostalgic in music, media, art and ideas
Curated by Sean Albiez
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Death and Vanilla | FIRE RECORDS

Death and Vanilla | FIRE RECORDS | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Formed in Malmö, Sweden by Marleen Nilsson and Anders Hansson, Death and Vanilla utilise vintage musical equipment such as vibraphone, organ, mellotron, tremolo guitar and moog, to emulate the sounds of 60s/70s soundtracks, library music, German Krautrock, French Ye-ye pop and 60s psych. They revel in the warmth of older analogue instruments to create a more organic sound, each loose wire and off-kilter noise adding to the rich atmosphere.'
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Hauntology and the trauma of social change: deindustrialising communities in Mumbai and provincial Russia | Postsocialism

Hauntology and the trauma of social change: deindustrialising communities in Mumbai and provincial Russia | Postsocialism | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'The term “hauntology” comes from research in popular cultural studies by Mark Fisher. Fisher used this term to link nostalgia about British 1970s popular culture of his youth to what he saw as the simultaneous pendulum swing towards the neoliberal, post-Fordist consensus. Michael Grasso’s reading of Fisher sees this transformation as leading “to a culture of retrospection and pastiche” typified by a particular form of consumption: “destruction of solidarity and security brought about a compensatory hungering for the well-established and the familiar?” For those growing up in the final stages of the previous period of full employment and widely enjoyed socio-economic rights and privileges, the subsequent period and present are experienced as a “unnatural”, “rigged”, or, in the words of Franco “Bifo” Berardi, a “slow cancellation of the future”. Like for the Mumbai mill workers, this is an example of “allochronically” experienced time, or at least diachronicity. The past expectations of the future are “cancelled”, yet the past, with its hopefulness, naïve beliefs, refuses to die in the present, even as the “majority” (the increasingly gentrified middle-class Mumbaikars) see in the mill workers and their factories, only ghosts of a time past.' - Postsocialism
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Fossil Aerosol Mining Project: August 53rd | Norman Records

Fossil Aerosol Mining Project: August 53rd | Norman Records | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'There’s an exquisite organic like beauty to the way in which they deconstruct and reconstruct the material they sample. Closing track ‘1991 from 2015’ transports us to a vast abandoned space where it almost feels like the listeners own body is being subjected to processes of weathering, decay and erosion. I half expected my skin to start falling off like flakes of oxidised metal. Fossil Aerosol Mining Project offers so much more than your average found sound constructed ambient. But then, they have been doing this since the early 80s. The source material remains as mysterious as the artists, yet despite this unfamiliarity, they’re able to evoke a sort of déjà vu or cryptomnesia that’s more powerful and authentic than the mediocrity of the latest hauntology nostalgia trip.' - Norman Records
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Nightmare on sea: a strange, once-forgotten history of the Kent coast is a cult favourite | Ben Myers | New Statesman

Nightmare on sea: a strange, once-forgotten history of the Kent coast is a cult favourite | Ben Myers | New Statesman | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Though tagged as psychogeography, David Seabrook’s strange and hypnotic study of the declining Kentish coastal districts of Medway and Thanet is more akin to its theoretical step-sibling of hauntology, the term spawned by Jacques Derrida to refer to a temporal disjunction in time and place, where a ghost can be perceived as “that which is neither present, nor absent, neither dead nor alive”. Neither word features in All the Devils Are Here, but plenty of ghosts do. First published in 2002, the book’s rediscovery will hopefully install it as an urtext for the hordes of drifters following in its slipstream. Seabrook did not get hung up on analysis. While there are shadows of WG Sebald and Iain Sinclair here – the latter called Seabrook “the dole-queue De Quincey” and helped him find a publisher – this is less an enlightened perambulation than a fevered nightmare.' - Ben Myers
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Ghosts of the Future: Hauntology, Premediation, and LIMBO | Adrien Robertson

Ghosts of the Future: Hauntology, Premediation, and LIMBO | Adrien Robertson | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Hauntology has found a foothold in literary scholarship. Textuality is understood to be spectral as such, a “space beyond the opposition” of the objective assumptions about the “otherwise sharp distinction between the real and the unreal.” Texts are where ghosts are not just found, but invited; in the words of Julian Wolfrey, “to tell a story is always to invoke ghosts, to open a space through with something other returns.” All stories are ghost stories, and textuality the space in between where ghosts are engaged with but not exorcised. It is on these grounds that video games and their narratives can be considered constitutive of the territory of spectrality, as a medium that frequently tells stories and can represent this in-between space.' - Adrien Robertson
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THE RESEARCHER SITS ON A SMALL CHAIR

THE RESEARCHER SITS ON A SMALL CHAIR | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'This philosophically driven work is intended to trouble the position of the small chair in early childhood settings. It is theoretically driven by an aspect of sociological and cultural theory called hauntology, and by the theories of new feminist materialism.' - Tim Blair
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Altering Reality on a Shoestring Budget: PBS’s ‘The Lathe of Heaven’ | Michael Grasso

Altering Reality on a Shoestring Budget: PBS’s ‘The Lathe of Heaven’ | Michael Grasso | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'In the wake of the passing of Ursula K. Le Guin last week, I took the opportunity to revisit one of the more fascinating products of her life and career: the 1980 television-movie adaptation of her 1971 novel The Lathe of Heaven. Produced by station WNET in New York City, the film is the summation of nearly a decade of technological and artistic experimentation in public television. It depicts a vision of the future firmly and perhaps unavoidably grounded in its present. But much like the timelines dreamed out of reality by the story’s protagonist, George Orr, The Lathe of Heaven would disappear from all but its viewers’ memories for nearly two decades. It thus became very much a haunted (and hauntological) work before its re-release in 2000, and for good reason. The Lathe of Heaven television movie used a memorable series of simple cinematographic tricks, cues from contemporary video art, canny set decoration, and monumental late-Brutalist and early-postmodernist architecture to convey a near future constantly riven by shifts in reality. In doing so without the use of many special effects, The Lathe of Heaven became a unique televisual object that stands as a testament to what American public broadcasting was able to produce on a bare-bones budget.' - Michael Grasso
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NEW music video work, Derrida, A haunted GAZE | Blackrice

NEW music video work, Derrida, A haunted GAZE | Blackrice | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'As part of of my own teaching and composition work, I've just completed the sketch below - a video response to a piece I composed as part of a previous EP, itself something of an exercise in unwitting hauntology. The video itself is composed entirely of youtube clips, most of which are digitisations of kids' toy advertisements from the 50s to 70s - including a number for products for "mothers". I'm fascinated by the maternal gaze here, and that of the 'child' - the lines between volition and passivity which the camera imbues both with, and how these parlay with each other, dependent on product and circumstance.' - Blackrice
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The Caretaker releases charity album dedicated to Mark Fisher | Resident Advisor

The Caretaker releases charity album dedicated to Mark Fisher | Resident Advisor | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Copies of Take Care, It's A Desert There were first distributed at Kirby's performance at the Barbican in London for an Unsound event last week. Today, 350 vinyl copies appeared on Boomkat, each signed and individually numbered. The LP features previously unreleased material—one long 48-minute track—from the ambient artist dedicated to Fisher, an electronic music writer and theorist who took his own life earlier this year. All proceeds from the release will go towards the mental health charity MIND. The cover artwork is a painting by the artist Ivan Seal, whose work has adorned past Caretaker records.'
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In Dread of Derrida | JHL Blog | Jonathon Catlin

In Dread of Derrida | JHL Blog | Jonathon Catlin | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'According to Ethan Kleinberg, historians are still living in fear of the specter of deconstruction; their attempted exorcisms have failed. In Haunting History: For a Deconstructive Approach to the Past (2017), Kleinberg fruitfully “conjures” this spirit so that historians might finally confront it and incorporate its strategies for representing elusive pasts.' - Jonathon Catlin

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On Not Getting The Neoliberal Anti-Hero We Wanted: Blade Runner’s Play With Nostalgia | Jennifer Cook

On Not Getting The Neoliberal Anti-Hero We Wanted: Blade Runner’s Play With Nostalgia | Jennifer Cook | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Ridley Scott’s genre critique of the corrupt corporation had evolved since its 20th century take in the Alien franchise, expanding to consciously address our own implication in the techno-dystopian social narrative. It turns out that we are no longer universally laboring blue collar victims in the secretive horrors of impending biopolitical technocracy. Rather, we are eager and satiated participants in its isolating ubiquity; high tech consumers implicated in all of the attendant social stratification, inequality, and suffering that its warm glow of access masks and accelerates, from facilitated gentrification and casualized labor, to the toxic, extra-legal wastelands of dead electronics processing.' - Jennifer Cook

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"Ghost Stories" with Bruce Lincoln and Martha Lincoln - Franklin Humanities Institute | November 2 - 3, 2017 | Duke University

"Ghost Stories" with Bruce Lincoln and Martha Lincoln - Franklin Humanities Institute | November 2 - 3, 2017 | Duke University | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'History and the humanities confront a troubling truth: that the present is the product of past events, but much of the past is unavailable, either accidentally or by design. In attempting to rationalize the present, we are frequently confronted by pasts that are not only ‘difficult’ for their traumatic legacies, but also epistemologically indeterminate. As a result, efforts to write the history of the present are shot through with uncanniness: unexplained causalities, mysterious antecedents, and contradictory accounts. 

Difficult histories pose an additional difficulty: In the interstices between the part of the past that is known and the part which is unknown lies all that is half-known, intuited, suspected, repressed, fantasized, demonized and embellished. Episodes that are difficult to resolve and reconstruct are often troubling, and may be experienced as ghostly, conspiratorial, and haunted.'
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Is Post-Modernism to Blame for our Post-Truth World? | LSE Podcasts

Speaker(s): Professor Mark Currie, Dr Alison Gibbons, Professor James Ladyman, Hilary Lawson | Did Derrida make us do it? 


Is our current situation the inevitable outcome of the intellectual adventuring of the twentieth century that critiqued grand narratives and challenged absolute truths? Or should we call upon the critical scepticism of post-modernism and post-structuralism with renewed vigour, to better see through the smoke and mirrors of contemporary culture? We ask what the relationship is between facts, alternative facts, and fiction, and explore the precarious status of truth in the twenty-first century.

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Andrew Sherwell - Orthodox Tapes | James Catchpole

Andrew Sherwell - Orthodox Tapes | James Catchpole | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'On Orthodox Tapes, London-based artist Andrew Sherwell dives into the dusty vortex of the past, using the style of hauntology to pursue a place of personal recollection and warm remembrance. Hauntology doesn’t usually highlight warmth. The Caretaker uses it to examine the horrifying decline of the mind while Pye Corner Audio uses it as a kind of ghost-box through which spirits and cool, VHS-recorded synths enter; it’s a style reeking of decay. Orthodox Tapes runs close to the latter because it broadcasts not only the music of the past but a life of the past. In this instance, nocturnal tape loops and creased-up field recordings summon up the many experiences of Andrew’s grandfather, who once travelled back and forth through the Balkans, Central Europe and Southern Russia during the inter-war period.' - James Catchpole
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UNDER OBSERVATION | MICRODEFORM

'There are two journeys to Under Observation. There’s the initial journey - the work is a collection of Liam McConaghys' time on tour during 2016. A year of sampling the same stock of tapes and vinyls, slowly learning to bring each one under control.

The second journey to Under Observations is in its depths. Less in terms of music’s tropes of emotional input/output, but more in its combination of hauntology and archaeology. A glacial journey through an earth of disembodied voices. Layer upon layer of analogue interference. It is under all these layers that the emotional pull of the work is found. A foreboding of a failed future among the broken melodies and a disjunction to our surface above.'

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Modern Aviation – ‘Rites and Rituals’ | We Are Cult

Modern Aviation – ‘Rites and Rituals’ | We Are Cult | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Although of a hauntological bent, albeit bucolic and mystical in feel rather than the Scarfolk-esque, Radiophonic Workshop-inspired explorations of the Ghost Box stable, Rites And Rituals is more evocative of the hinterlands of Robert Fripp and Brian Eno’s transcendent Evening Star, and the disquieting sound collages of Basil Kirchin’s Worlds Within Worlds.' - James Gent
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Hauntification, Aesthetics and Gentrified Toys in a Glass Globe (Or Making Glitch Art Out of Derrida Instead) | Yvette Granata

Hauntification, Aesthetics and Gentrified Toys in a Glass Globe (Or Making Glitch Art Out of Derrida Instead) | Yvette Granata | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'The hauntological trend of recent years is therefore tied to this notion: we have been thwarted, we have been dispossessed. While Derrida’s original text said as much in relation to Marxism – that Marxism will haunt the newly rising global economy because we will become thwarted by capitalism – aesthetic trends deemed the ‘hauntological’ focus not on the appearance of Marxism’s ghosts, but on the hauntings of our dispossessions — or that which was taken from us. It is an art that looks at a future that we lost, or looks back to the future that was promised to us that was never brought into fruition. While punk and cyberpunk aesthetics may be precursors, there is a distinct figuration of lamentation in the hauntological.' - Yvette Granata

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CFP: Stranger Things: The Weird, the Paranormal, and the Problem of Belief, 20–21 April 2018, Urbana, IL – International Association for the Fantastic in the Arts

'Ghosts, spirits, and supernatural beings occupy much of our contemporary cultural imagination, as shown by the runaway successes of David Lynch’s revamped Twin Peaks and the Netflix original series Stranger Things. At the same time, the humanist modes of thinking that Western philosophy has relied on to make sense of the world have proven insufficient. What we have assumed to be inanimate, insentient, nonexistent, or even dead has come to haunt our previous theories and has helped to spur developments in critical thought that include object-oriented ontology, thing theory, and critical animal and/or plant studies. All these developments have troubled humanity’s relationship with the world in ways that may be termed “weird.” Indeed, these new approaches assure us, to borrow from Hamlet, that there are more things in heaven and earth than are dreamt of in our philosophies.' Skye Cervone

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Theory and Conjecture: ‘In Search of…’ and the Golden Age of Paranormal TV | We Are the Mutants

Theory and Conjecture: ‘In Search of…’ and the Golden Age of Paranormal TV | We Are the Mutants | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'I mentioned at the outset that In Search of… feels like outsider art, and it’s not just the Weird topics the show covered or the array of oddballs they interviewed. It’s the visual and sonic aesthetic as well: the grainy film stock, those eerie synths, the charmingly amateurish recreations. Try to get something like this on cable television in the mid-to-late ’80s and you’d have been absolutely out of luck. It’s one of the reasons why, whatever happens, Zachary Quinto’s late-’10s version of the show won’t be able to hold a candle to the original (nor did the version hosted by The X-Files‘ Mitch Pileggi in the early ’00s). In Search of… is the product of a unique set of environment, influences, and circumstances that we’ll likely never see again. It’s a document of its time and place, a serialized encyclopedia of the tabloid occult that bubbled under the surface of an American media monoculture that is long gone. These reasons, and so many more, are why the show will always remain so close to my heart.' - Michael Grasso
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Drew Mulholland aka Mount Vernon Arts Lab discography hits Bandcamp | The Wire

Drew Mulholland aka Mount Vernon Arts Lab discography hits Bandcamp | The Wire | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Glasgow based composer Drew Mulholland – aka Mount Vernon Arts Lab – will upload his entire discography to Bandcamp for streaming and purchase. Among the first releases to be digitised is a previously unreleased collaboration with Coil, the 23 minute “A Spectre Calls”.'
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Novelty, Speculation, Heartbreak: How pop music conceives of “the future” (1983-2017) | Robin James

'Looking at US and UK pop from the Reagan-Thatcher era through today, I will argue that the concept of “future” changes. In the era of modern rock, post-punk, and new wave, “future” means novelty–a very modernist definition not too far from Russolo. Between 1983 and 2017, neoliberalism (the view that everything, including traditionally non-economic phenomena like friendship, behaves like a deregulated, financialized market) ensconced itself at the core of Western politics; at the same time, it replaced (post)modernist aesthetics. As Steven Shaviro argues, neoliberalism co-opts modernist transgression: “Business and marketing practices today are increasingly focused upon novelty and innovation…Far from being subversive or oppositional, transgression is the actual motor of capitalist expansion today.” Roussloian futurist sonics are now the center of a capitalist realism that has foreclosed our ability to hear any future different than the present (i.e., retromania). Neoliberalism shifts our concept of the future, replacing “newness” with cost/benefit speculation. This is why the “we” of the white mainstream no longer think “alternatives” (capitalist realism) or hear anything but repurposed pasts (retromania). Instead, we hear interests, interests that can augment or diminish our human/aesthetic capital.' - Robin Jmaes
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From Stranger Things to IT, why do we love TV shows from the Eighties so much | David Barnett

From Stranger Things to IT, why do we love TV shows from the Eighties so much | David Barnett | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'Nostalgia is a powerful weapon in the battle for ratings, and the Eighties is a particularly hard-fought territory. Which is a curious thing, because most of us who lived through it don’t particularly remember it being that great. But then, perhaps that’s sort of the point.' - David Barnett
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An Evening with D.A.P (Dmitri Aleksandrovich Prigov): A Phantom Broadcast | Tuesday 14th November

An Evening with D.A.P (Dmitri Aleksandrovich Prigov): A Phantom Broadcast | Tuesday 14th November | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'An Evening with D.A.P (Dmitri Aleksandrovich Prigov): A Phantom Broadcast is both a sound séance, and “an active homage of hauntology” that connects places and people, times and spaces, uncanny sounds and disembodied voices.

Richard Crow [is an] inter-disciplinary artist, working in the field of experimental audio research and performance, with an MA in Sonic Arts from Middlesex University (2006). Crow manifests sound and noise for its disruptive, visceral and affective qualities and its psycho-physical implications for the listener. His solo and collaborative performances have consisted of highly conceptualised interventions into base materiality, investigations of alternative systems of organisation and research into a certain material decadence, most notably with the project The Institution of Rot.'
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