Hauntology
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Hauntology
All things hauntological, atemporal and future past nostalgic in music, media, art and ideas
Curated by Sean Albiez
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Dérives: The Magnet and The Last Resort (New Brighton) | Celluloid Wicker Man

Dérives: The Magnet and The Last Resort (New Brighton) | Celluloid Wicker Man | Hauntology | Scoop.it
'I remember the stories my grandparents would tell me about going to this ballroom. My granddad sang here, losing out to Gerry and the Pacemakers in a talent competition. Look up any archive photos and the place feels alive, vibrant, you can almost hear the music playing; a hauntology not unlike The Shining. To rub salt in the wound, there’s now a blue plaque on a plinth to commemorate the “27 occasions” when The Beatles played the ballroom. Only in the north west could a building be deemed both suitable to be demolished (which it was after a fire in 1969, a fate that renders any building on Merseyside handily irreparable) and worthy of a commemorative plaque celebrating its historical importance.' - Adam Scovell
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blissblog: in memoriam | Simon Reynolds

blissblog: in memoriam | Simon Reynolds | Hauntology | Scoop.it
A great piece by Simon Reynolds on the intersection of personal memory and loss
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Tryweryn: the Story of a Valley [1965]

Tryweryn: the Story of a Valley [1965] | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'The local school is closed, the chapel celebrates its last wedding, furniture that has stood in farmhouses for centuries is removed, graves are dug up and re-located. Thus did the Tryweryn Valley and the village of Capel Celyn become one vast reservoir via an Act of Parliament that allowed Liverpool City Council to proceed with the creation of its new water supply despite the opposition of every Welsh MP bar one.

 

The Tryweryn Bill allowed Liverpool City Council to by-pass obtaining planning consent from the relevant local authorities. Wales’ powerlessness was exposed and protests involved members of the Free Wales Army and Mudiad Amddiffyn Cymru. Pupils and staff of Friars School in Bangor filmed the demolition and construction work from start to finish and have produced what might have been regarded as an objective record of an emotive event. The school concludes that the reservoir has enhanced the natural beauty of the area and that it will attract tourists “to enjoy the sailing and fishing on these once troubled waters."'

Sean Albiez's insight:

With thanks to Laura Denning for drawing my attention to this.

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What is Cities and Memory?

What is Cities and Memory? | Hauntology | Scoop.it
Cities and Memory is a global field recording & sound art work that presents the present reality of a place and also its imagined, alternative counterpart.
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The Eeriness of the English Countryside - Robert Macfarlane - The Guardian

The Eeriness of the English Countryside - Robert Macfarlane - The Guardian | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Writers and artists have long been fascinated by the idea of an English eerie - ‘the skull beneath the skin of the countryside’. But for a new generation this has nothing to do with hokey supernaturalism – it’s a cultural and political response to contemporary crises and fears'

 

'This eerie counter-culture – this occulture – is drawing in experimental film-makers, folk singers, folklorists, academics, avant-garde antiquaries, landscape historians, utopians, collectives, mainstreamers and Arch-Droods alike, in a magnificent mash-up of hauntology, geological sentience and political activism. The hedgerows, fields, ruins, hills and saltings of England have been set seething.' - Robert Macfarlane

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Memory, History and Time in 21st Century British Psychogeography | News re. new edited collection for 2015

Memory, History and Time in 21st Century British Psychogeography | News re. new edited collection for 2015 | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Our relationship with the city is intrinsically tied up with our knowledge and memory of it. If a particular city is somewhere we know – from today or from our past – we are unable to separate our psychological responses to it from the materiality of the place itself.

 

This, in fact, is psychogeography and is what makes us all psychogeographers to a degree. A sense of place connects us to a geographic region in a specific way that becomes apparent when we start to explore the emotions attached to particular urban pockets that spark something in us. It might be a memory from our adolescence, such as an independent record shop in our hometown where we purchased our first piece of vinyl, or a more recent memory we have of the experience of moving to a new town or city and the differing aesthetics of that place compared to our last home.

 

These memories are not separate from our self, they inform and form us. The experience of the everyday that is played out in space – walking to the train station, going to the supermarket, taking the dog for a walk – make up a significant part of our day. These practices are imprinted on our psyches over time, forming our relationship with space and at the same time are laid down in our memory of that place, creating our attachment to it.' - Tina Richardson

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Clifton Rocks Railway - Bristol

Clifton Rocks Railway - Bristol | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'Welcome to the Clifton Rocks Railway restoration project official site. The project is dedicated to restoring one of Bristol's hidden gems......'

 

Also a BBC studio in WWII ...

 

'Top Room: Transmitters Various transmitters were incorporated in this room. One served Bristol with programmes whilst two others were set up o keep the station in touch with the outside World in an extreme emergency. The largest transmitter was an American RCA 'H' group transmitter operating on 203.5 m and broadcasting the home service. This had been brought over from America on lend lease in the early days of the War. The other two consisted of a Harvey McNamara shortwave set, and an ex RAF medium wave transmitter for restoring communication between the other main provincial and metropolitan broadcasting stations should the Post Office telephone lines be damaged by enemy action.

 

Second Chamber Down: Studio This was equipped with piano, gramophone and other facilities for musical, dramatic or school's programmes and could take a cast of 10-15 actors. Poor acoustics were accommodated by installing heavy carpets and providing strategically placed quilting on the walls. Small scale musical, dramatic or feature programmes could be produced in this room.

 

The Third Chamber Down: Recording Room This room contained a Philips-Miller record and replay machine which used gelatine coated celluloid film 7mm wide, onto which recordings were cut with a sapphire stylus. Also within this room were sufficient programmes for many weeks of broadcasting.

 

Fourth Chamber Down: Control Room Here the BBC Engineers surpassed themselves in compressing an enormous amount of equipment into a very small space. The room incorporated switching gear for no fewer than 80 land lines leading to outside stations. The Post Office routed these in various formations to minimise the risk of a single bomb damaging all in one go.'

Sean Albiez's insight:

Drove past here the other day - fascinated by it ...

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On Vanishing Land [Mark Fisher and Justin Barton] - Simon Reynolds

On Vanishing Land [Mark Fisher and Justin Barton] - Simon Reynolds | Hauntology | Scoop.it

Thanks to David Pattie for alerting me to this:

 

'On Vanishing Land (2013, 45m) is a magisterial audio-essay that evokes a walk undertaken by the artists along the Suffolk coastline in 2005, from Felixstowe container port to the Anglo-Saxon burial ground at Sutton Hoo. Fisher and Barton have conjured a new form of sonic fiction from the dreamings, gleamings and prefigurations that pervade the Suffolk coast. The work includes commissions from digital musicians, interviews and the reflections of the artists. Inspired by the cumulative force of the Eerie that animates this landscape, On Vanishing Landpursues affinities between the modernist reinvention of the ghost story in M.R. James’ Oh, Whistle, And I’ll Come To You, My Lad (1904) and the atmospheric engineering of  Brian Eno’s album On Land (1982). “Themes of incursion - by unnameable forces, geological sentience or temporal anomaly - recur throughout.” (Kodwo Eshun, The Otolith Collective, Curator,  On Vanishing Land)' - Simon Reynolds

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Hookland: Folklore, Landscape Punk and Psychogeography - #FolkloreThursday

Hookland: Folklore, Landscape Punk and Psychogeography - #FolkloreThursday | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'While landscape changes and stories decay, the marriage of the two – folklore – remains the constant dance in our collective memory.' - David Southwell [Thanks to Adam Stewart for the suggestion]

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Adam Stewart's comment, June 21, 2016 3:05 AM
The Hookland twitter channel is well worth following too
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Projections on a Wall: A Hauntology - Frank Garrett

Projections on a Wall: A Hauntology - Frank Garrett | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'History erupts in sometimes disturbing ways in the palimpsest that is present-day Berlin. You can’t just focus on one time period when you visit the city. Today’s Berlin opens up within a hall of mirrors that reflects and refracts all those other Berlins. To speak about the Berlin of the past 26 years requires the vocabulary of the Cold War. You find that this discourse still operates within the semiotics of the murderous Third Reich, utilising the grammar of the First World War as inflected in the vernacular of Expressionism. Prussian imperialism provides the city’s basic syntax. One nonetheless must be fluent in history, then, before attempting to read Berlin.' - Frank Garrett

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Hidden Valleys: Haunted by the Future || Justin Barton || Zero Books

Hidden Valleys: Haunted by the Future || Justin Barton || Zero Books | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'The future is alongside us, sometimes closer, sometimes further away.

 

Hidden Valleys starts from the perception that the human world is an eerie place, particularly in relation to its stories and dreams. It also starts from events that took place in North Yorkshire, in 1978. A work of philosophy, an account of experiences, and a biography of a year, it is simultaneously a challenging cultural analysis, drawing on novels, songs and films. It argues for lucidity over reason, becomings over conventional gender and familialism, groups over state politics, and for an escape to wider realities in place of the delusions of religion. Most centrally it breaks open a view of a futural dimension that coexists with the present, and which intrinsically involves a heightened awareness and evaluation of the planet, of women, and of the abstract. Inseparably it is also a detective investigation into the causes of the eerie human predicament. The book reaches the planetary by starting from a singular place, it reaches reality by starting from dreams, and it reaches the future by finding a doorway in the past.' - Zero Books

 

Launch event 16th June 2015 - details here

http://www.theshowroom.org/programme.html?id=1897%2c2051

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I Love This Dirty Town [BBC 1969]

I Love This Dirty Town [BBC 1969] | Hauntology | Scoop.it

Margaret Drabble investigates the problems of town planning and traffic in London. (1969)

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The Quietus | Features | In Extremis | Deviant Logic Unfolding: English Heretic Interviewed

The Quietus | Features | In Extremis | Deviant Logic Unfolding: English Heretic Interviewed | Hauntology | Scoop.it

'English Heretic's releases are far more than mere concept albums, though. As Andy Sharp, chief executive of English Heretic, reveals, they're conceived through an extraordinary and elaborate creative process, forming multimedia mash-ups to "fecundate the imagination". His methodology takes in magick, psychogeography and horror film geekdom, along with firm roots in Britain's industrial music culture of the early 1980s, to form potent, novel topographies of an otherwise unconnected world of occultists and psychopaths.' - Russell Cuzner

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Apparition Apparatus: Contemporary Urban Hauntology

'Project Summary

Cold weather cultures deploy legends of ghosts and snow creatures as figurative intermediaries to explain and manage severe weather. These echoplasmic mediators bring forth issues of wayfinding, exposure and shelter from the scope of folklore directly tied to the effects of severe weather. Apparition Apparatus incorporates self-sustaining technology and real-time input to urban infrastructure and architecture to act as a wayfinding and localized weather warning system for those caught on their journey to safety and shelter. Since an apparition can leak beyond containment and carry itself across frequencies far beyond physical boundaries, assistance and information arrives before first responders can expand their scope and cover the physical distance. It is a ghostly companion for navigating the cold weather city. The Apparition Apparatus is at times a voice, a presence, footprints, signals, reflections on a window pane, a doorway, a road, in various configuration and purpose as are the figures of folklores to help manage the scope of harsh weather. The configuration is infrastructural, architectural and technological derived from contemporary use of information, but the interaction is tied to deep rooted traditions of cold place folklore.' - Janet Yoon

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