Hauntology
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Faith in the Ghosts of Literature. Poetic Hauntology in Derrida, Blanchot and Morrison’s Beloved - Elisabeth M. Loevlie

'Literature, this paper argues, is a privileged language that can give form to those specters of existence that resist the traditional ontological boundaries of being and non-being, alive and dead. This I describe as the “hauntology” of literature. Literature, unlike our everyday, referential language, is not obliged to refer to a determinable reality, or to sustain meaning. It can therefore be viewed as a negation of the world of things and sensible phenomena. Yet it gives us access to vivid and sensory rich worlds. The status of this literary world, then, is strangely in-between; its ontology is not present and fixed, but rather quivering or ghostlike. The “I” that speaks in a literary text never coincides with the “I” of the writing subject, rather they haunt each other. This theoretical understanding is based on texts by Jacques Derrida and Maurice Blanchot. The paper also draws an analogy between this spectral dynamic of literature and an understanding of religious faith or belief. Belief relates to that which cannot be ontologically fixed or verified, be it God, angels, or spirits. Literature, because it releases and sustains this ontological quivering, can transmit the ineffable, the repressed and transcendent. With this starting point, I turn to Toni Morrison’s book Beloved (1987) and to Beloved’s strange, spectral monologue. By giving literary voice to the dead, Morrison releases literature’s hauntology to express the horror that history books cannot convey, and that our memory struggles to contain.' - Elisabeth M. Loevlie


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At the Edge Archives: Main List

At the Edge Archives: Main List | Hauntology | Scoop.it

Exploring new interpretations 
of past and place 
in archaeology, folklore 
and mythology

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Dissolving boundaries between folklore, archeology and myth

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Interview & Mix // The Outer Church | Kit Records

Interview & Mix // The Outer Church | Kit Records | Hauntology | Scoop.it

The Green Door Store was already quite creepy, what with being buried in a network of cellars under Brighton station along with abandoned WWII firing ranges and Turkish baths that haven’t seen the light of day (or naked bums) for decades. That was before The Outer Church made it their haunt of choice, allowing acts like Paper Dollhouse and Jessica Bailiff to further darken its cobbledy caves with their psychedelic brood.

We communed with the man behind the OC, Joseph Stannard, about upcoming projects, rural psychedelia and malevolent lighthouses. We’re also very proud to present Kit Mix #14, an enveloping swathe of countryside wooz and menace constructed by Joseph, entitled Halos Over The Mission

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Hauntology, mysticism, English rural psychedlia

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The Belbury Parish Magazine: JOHN FOXX AND THE BELBURY CIRCLE

The Belbury Parish Magazine: JOHN FOXX AND THE BELBURY CIRCLE | Hauntology | Scoop.it

This September on Ghost Box...


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ReynoldsRetro

HAUNTED AUDIO, a/k/a SOCIETY OF THE SPECTRAL: Ghost Box, Mordant Music and Hauntology

director's cut, The Wire, November 2006

by Simon Reynolds

There’s a lot of “ghosts” abroad these days. When it comes to band names and song titles, only “wolf” rivals “ghost” for frequency and for that elusive-yet-palpable quality of tapping the Zeitgeist (literally “time-ghost” in German). Recent sightings include the New York outfit Ghostcloud (whose singer Noah Simring committed suicide this summer) and the new album by Infantjoy, which contains a cover of Japan’s “Ghosts,” a track called “A Haunted Space” and another, “Absence,” that’s virtually a manifesto for the spectral current in today’s music. “It is necessary to speak of the ghost…” incants Paul Morley, pop writer extraordinaire and half of Infantjoy. “Speak to the spectre, engage it, encounter it… We are always haunted by ghosts but we cannot freely choose what we will be haunted by..”” Then there’s dubstep producer Kode 9, who covered the Specials’ “Ghost Town” and describes dubstep as “a kind of ghosted version of jungle”.

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Simon Reynold's original Hauntology post for Wire Magazine

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The New York Review of Science Fiction: Liminal Places and Liminal States in John Crowley’s Little, Big, by Bernadette Lynn Bosky

The New York Review of Science Fiction: Liminal Places and Liminal States in John Crowley’s Little, Big, by Bernadette Lynn Bosky | Hauntology | Scoop.it
Introduction: Theory and Thesis Especially over the past fifteen years, the terms “liminal” or “liminality” and “interstitial” have become increasingly popular in discussion of the arts.
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Thin places, science fiction

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