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Rescooped by Drew Bulbuk from Educational Technology News
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15 Strategies Educators Can Use to Stop Cyberbullying

15 Strategies Educators Can Use to Stop Cyberbullying | Hatred Online | Scoop.it

"The advent of technology has brought with it familiar problems in new forms. Yet cyberbullying is unique in many ways. What makes cyberbullying so different than in-person bullying? As educators, we need to be specifically aware of cyberbullying. Why is it so important to address cyberbullying in schools first? The Center for Safe and Responsible Internet Use, argues that two thirds of school violence begins through social media. Cyberbullying can lead to school failure, psychological implications, depression, violence and illegal activity."

 


Via EDTECH@UTRGV
Drew Bulbuk's insight:

This article provided a lot of insight on why people act the way they do online.  One stat that jumped out to me was that in 81% of violent incidents, someone other than the attacker knew something was going to happen, but did nothing to stop it.  That leads me to believe that while online anger may seem like fantasy, it doesn't stop there.  Being in a position to help someone in person and not doing so would be far less common than online, because it seems surreal.  The article also states that younger generations relate to one another online much easier because they can provide the person that they truly want to be.  It also mentions that there usually isn't parental interaction when a young adult is saying inappropriate things online.  This goes back to properly raising children in the first place, and gives me an idea as to why a child would be empowered to hurt others.

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Nozy's curator insight, May 25, 2017 2:49 PM
It is of importance that teachers become aware of cyberbullying and actively take part in attempting to address this issue.
Rescooped by Drew Bulbuk from Brains & Things
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Psychology of Internet Trolls: Researchers Explain Rise of Cyberbullying and Why People Seem Angrier on the Internet

Alan Manevitz, a clinical psychiatrist at New York City's Lenox Hill Hospital, theorizes that people feel a freedom of speech that they cannot feel elsewhere, where there are few, if any, consequences.

Via Rexi44
Drew Bulbuk's insight:

This is probably the best article that I read overall.  Oftentimes I've heard someone mention that they can say whatever they want online because it's their freedom to do so.  As Alan Manevitz, a clinical phychiatrist at New York City's Lenox Hill Hospital says, people online feel a freedom that they can't feel anywhere else, which empowers them to act on certain fantasies.  Simon Rego, a director of phychology training at director at New York City's Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College, explained to Health Magazine that our brains are hard-wired to take on non-verbal cues such as body language, tone, and facial expressions.  Those are taken away online, which very easily heightens people's level of discourse.  The article actually starts with a heartfelt scenario-an olympic diverer wanted to win the gold medal for his deceased father, only to fall short.  An annonymouse person tweeted at him after he failed to win, mocking him about his dad.  This is such a terrible thought, and it leaves me to wonder what that scenario would look like if that person was face to face with the diver.  Would he berate him, feel bad for him, or do nothing at all?  My guess is that he certainly wouldn't say anything negative, and this article is spot on with those points.

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Rescooped by Drew Bulbuk from Online Bullying and Internet Safety Resources
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Using Internet & Cell Phone Technology Safely: What Families Need to Know

This article addresses the importance of technology in the lives of children, safety tips for Interent harassment, cyberbullying, Interent safety and cell phone safety.


Via Jackie Jenkins
Drew Bulbuk's insight:

This article does an excellent job at showing the preventative measures needed to correctly deal with bullying online.  There were a few things that I noticed as I was going over it-

1. The author speaks to the digital age, where every child from here on out, that has the resources, will grow up knowing about online information.  They will know how to use cell phones and computers at a younger age, which leads me to believe that these kids will need to be educated at younger and younger ages as time goes on.

2. The internet connects young people instantly from all over the world.  While reading this article, I was thinking about the times I've played Xbox online and heard someone say horrendous things to someone else.  This is scary because not only do they feel they are above the law, they can very easily cause other kids to become defensive at any even earlier time period.  

3. Someone has to be internet savy to notice the nuance of cyberbullying.  When the younger generation is more in control, thanks to their exposure to technology, it makes it nearly impossible for adults to police their children properly.  This is an easy way for someone online to take advantage of a situation.

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Curbing online hate proves a modern-day dilemma - Heritage Florida Jewish News

Curbing online hate proves a modern-day dilemma Heritage Florida Jewish News Abraham Foxman, the Anti-Defamation League national director, attempts to pin down an answer to the question in his latest book, “Viral Hate.” Co-authored with privacy...
Drew Bulbuk's insight:

How do you confront hatred when it has no fixed address?  This lede is a wonderful question, and it represents a huge issue with online hatred.  If there are no repercussions in such a huge market, why should someone care?  Privacy lawyer Christopher Wolf says that "social media sites have developed a technology that has some wonderful things, but also has unintended consequences."  He preaches personal responsibility and education on the dangers of online intolerance in schools.  He believes that a day is coming where people will be held accountable for what they say online, with no anonymity.  I was reminded of a time where all races weren't considered equal and the accepted people were allowed to say bigoted comments.  That time has since been turned upside down, and it gives me hope that we'll see a day where people can't speak behind a throwaway name online. 

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Vitriol Online for Cheerios Ad With Interracial Family - New York Times

Vitriol Online for Cheerios Ad With Interracial Family - New York Times | Hatred Online | Scoop.it
New York Times
Vitriol Online for Cheerios Ad With Interracial Family
New York Times
The Cheerios spot shows a young girl asking her mother if the cereal is “good for your heart.” Her mother assures her that is so.
Drew Bulbuk's insight:

This article centers around a good depiction of what my question looks like.  Last month, Cheerios released a commercial that was as normal as any other, except for the portrayal of the family in it.  The family was interracial, and certainly not outside the ordinary for 2013.  One of the roots of my issue is that people fear what they do not know, and the backlash was severe.  The ad was available for viewing on Youtube, and the racist comments were so common and devestating that General Mills disabled the comment portion of the footage.  Cheerios released a statement saying that there are many kinds of famililies, and they'd like to celebrate them all.  If someone is willing to make bigoted statements about a family of actors, the problem obviously runs deeper.  This may be a question more apt for a psychology course, but it explains a lot as to why someone could have such senseless hate for someone they don't even know.

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Rescooped by Drew Bulbuk from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
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Preparing youth to deal with hate on the Internet | MediaSmarts

Preparing youth to deal with hate on the Internet | MediaSmarts | Hatred Online | Scoop.it

"The Boston Marathon tragedy has raised questions about the role the Internet plays in radicalizing youth and, more generally, how it may be used to perpetuate hatred. In Canada, similar questions are being asked about the radicalization of four London Ontario students in the wake of last January’s attack on an Algerian gas plant. Sadly, just as hate is a fact of life offline, it also exists in the digital world. As Rabbi Abraham Cooper, associate dean of the Simon Wiesenthal Center, put it, "wherever you have contentious kinds of historic issues, or classic hatreds, we’re beginning to see it percolate online." With this in mind, it is in our best interest to better understand how hate groups are using networked technologies and those who are most at risk."


Via John Evans
Drew Bulbuk's insight:

This article deals with media literacy in our youth.  In particular, it speaks to the growing trend of exposure for earlier generations.  Young people are radicalized, and begin to negatively reinforce around the age of 12.  It is easy for them to latch on to this behavior because that is right around the time they are trying to form a sense of identity.  This really helps explain a basic part of my research question.  If a young adult is raised to put down others to gain acceptance, that mentality will continue to develop.  As Abraham Cooper, associate dean of the Simon Wiesenthal Center, puts it, "hate groups draw on a number of basic psychological mechanisms to attract and indoctrinate believers, both conciously and unconciously."  Hating on someone online provides a sense of comfort because the recipient is a easy target.  This is the lesson that must be taught to young children as they grow up in the digital age.

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Empathy, communication, student leaders key to tackling cyberbullying

Empathy, communication, student leaders key to tackling cyberbullying | Hatred Online | Scoop.it

In schools, that means working harder to cultivate a “culture of empathy” that extends beyond classrooms into cyberspace, he said, because technology makes it easier to factor conscience and morals out of communications. School systems that have experienced the greatest success in establishing a sense of “collectiveness” do so by enlisting students to lead the effort, he said.

 

Empathy must extend to those accused of cyberbullying. Because adolescents have yet to fully develop coping mechanisms for dealing with frustration, anger or jealousy, society must guard against scapegoating those accused of cyberbullying.


Via Edwin Rutsch
Drew Bulbuk's insight:

This is an interesting look at what could be done to prevent cyberbullying. If someone gets so upset, and takes it out on others online, they have no repercussion.  Legislature was recently passed to hold people accountable for this actions.  A school in Maine is even forcing students to use the internet through their online profiles, which can be easily tracked by the school district.  This is a great way of preventing the issue, but it certainly doesn't change the person.  It does a good job of showing people that their actions are detrimental as well.  The article states that adolescents have a hard time with coping mechanisms because they are still so immature in nature.  A separate paper I read on a different site quoted a 15 year old boy that said he only cyberbullied someone because it was a response to being cyberbullied the week before.  This mentality makes since for someone that age, and really shows where the source of the problem can lie.

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» 5 Tips to Keep Cyberbullying Out of Your Home - Beating the Bully: Cope with Bullying At Any Age

» 5 Tips to Keep Cyberbullying Out of Your Home - Beating the Bully: Cope with Bullying At Any Age | Hatred Online | Scoop.it

If there is one hot button topic among parents and students it is cyberbullying – what is it exactly, how to stop it (or is it even stoppable!), and why do young people do it. STOP Cyberbullying is a great online resource for anyone who is concerned about this topic. STOP Cyberbullying states:

“Cyberbullying” is when a child, preteen or teen is tormented, threatened, harassed, humiliated, embarrassed or otherwise targeted by another child, preteen or teen using the Internet, interactive and digital technologies or mobile phones.

Drew Bulbuk's insight:

Here's another lesson that I learned while researching this topic-Kids have far too much time on their hands!  The study conducted for this article says that youth aged 8-18 spend roughly 7.5 hour per day using some form of media.  Do I believe you have to have bad intentions to bully someone online?  Yes, but I also think certain kids can be enabled to go outside the box by having too much access, and for far too long a time.  This article also tells parents to emphasize that they need to act online like they would offline.  This goes back to my point in the last article, which is that kids today will have to grow up with online knowledge, no matter where they're from.  It also shows that if they aren't being taught the basics of respecting others at home, they are likely to continue that behavior on the internet.  

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STOP cyberbullying: Cyberbullying - what it is, how it works and how to understand and deal with cyberbullies

STOP cyberbullying: Cyberbullying - what it is, how it works and how to understand and deal with cyberbullies | Hatred Online | Scoop.it
What cyberbullying is, how it works and how to understand and deal with cyberbullies.

Via Jackie Jenkins
Drew Bulbuk's insight:

This was a very helpul website.  The writer of it sat down with 20 young students to discuss their online habits.  They were very open about their activity, which was sometimes extremely cruel.  This brought up a thought that I hadn't had up to this point.  I get that a kid could like annonymity online, but to openly admit such severe acts to a stranger leads me to believe that they don't understand the severity of what they're doing.  They also act out their fantasies online, as we see with the young boy who is an outstanding student in the classroom, but does terrible things online. When you put someone down by creating fake profiles of them, or issuing death threats, you clearly aren't capable of understanding the reality of your situation.  That same boy said that he did it simply because he could.  To have power that you might have attained otherwise seems to be a likely reason for these kind of actions, which seem to start at a very early age.

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Time to fight the epidemic of online hate - Fox News

Time to fight the epidemic of online hate
Fox News
Some simply shrug off online hate as the inevitable effluent of Internet freedom and rationalize it as a problem too big to address.
Drew Bulbuk's insight:

As I mentioned in an earlier article, Youtube and Google did nothing to stem the issue of having their advertisements on tirade-laden videos.  Here, we see a difference being made when several womens advocates spoke out about Facebook's handling of misogynistic videos.  Unlike the terrorist videos on Youtube, these women made enough noise to actually do something about their issue, and Facebook responded.  In Abraham Foxman's article, he states that "Online hate traumatizes its targets.  It also serves to rally and attract others who might share its bigoted message."  By acting on the hatred, these women were able to hold people accountable online.  They say that online free speech is a wonderful thing, but that the recipients shouldn't remain silent.  By speaking out on their issues, they were able to see action.  Earlier in the semester, we read Danah Boyd's article Why Youth (Heart) Social Network Sites: The Role of Networked Publics in Teenage Social Life.  In it, she explains the desire for young people to obtain acceptance through any means possible, even to the point of creating online illusions.  People need to fight for their freedoms, even online.



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Google cashes in on hate videos: Internet giant puts ads alongside thousands ... - Daily Mail

Google cashes in on hate videos: Internet giant puts ads alongside thousands ... - Daily Mail | Hatred Online | Scoop.it
Daily Mail
Google cashes in on hate videos: Internet giant puts ads alongside thousands ...
Daily Mail
Google is profiting from adverts which appear alongside vile terror videos on YouTube, it emerged last night.
Drew Bulbuk's insight:

This is a unique look at my question, and one that I wasn't expecting.  The internet is the ultimate forum for free speech, which can even include tyranical rants.  I would assume that the majority of people believe hatred preached online is wrong, but there is one thing that trumps that sense of morality-the almighty dollar.  This article, published by a newspaper in the United Kingdom, spells it out for us.  Media giants such as Google and Youtube are willing to advertise on hatred-laden videos as long as they are generating hits.  Turning a profit is the most important thing to them, and this mindset shows that by abandoning your morals, you too can get what you ultimately desire.  Not a very good message to deliver to young people.  It says, "you can sacrifice a good part of you, belittle others, and still gain the ultimate goal, dirty as it may be." 

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Second man arrested over Muslim prayer centre Facebook comments

Second man arrested over Muslim prayer centre Facebook comments | Hatred Online | Scoop.it
A second man has been arrested for alleged race hate comments made on the internet over the proposed Muslim prayer centre in Shrewsbury, it was revealed today.

Via @NewDayStarts
Drew Bulbuk's insight:

This is one aspect of online hate that I think goes largely unnoticed.  The mindset behind providing threats and hatred online is that even if they are real in nature, they seem impossible to contain.  With the internet being such a vast culture of information, it doesn't seem possible that anyone could be held accountable.  Here we see two men getting arrested for the plans they were making.  They could have just been a scare tactic, but their actions are being brought to justice.  While it's difficult to believe you could get in actual trouble online, stories like this provide some hope.  In Tim Adams' piece, he states that "it appeared to me that a lot of the things I was hated for were things I was actually trying to do; a lot of what people considered failings were to me successes."  These two men obviously don't understand the Muslim culture, or even respect their right to religious freedom.  By showing someone can be brought to justice for their actions online, I believe this kind of behavior can be curbed.

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