Hantavirus
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Product Focus: c-Jun Product from US Biological

Product Focus: c-Jun Product from US Biological | Hantavirus | Scoop.it
c-Jun is a major component of the heterodimeric transcription factor AP-1 and is essential for embryonic development. It mediates several cellular processes, including proliferation and survival, a...
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PLOS Pathogens: Phylogeny and Origins of Hantaviruses Harbored by Bats, Insectivores, and Rodents

PLOS Pathogens: Phylogeny and Origins of Hantaviruses Harbored by Bats, Insectivores, and Rodents | Hantavirus | Scoop.it

Hantaviruses are important human pathogens, occasionally emerging from animal reservoirs. However, both the biodiversity of hantaviruses in nature, as well as the frequency with which they have jumped species barriers in the past, are unclear. Here, we describe four novel hantaviruses (Huangpi virus, Lianghe virus, Longquan virus, and Yakeshi virus) that were sampled from bats and shrews in China. These viruses are different from known hantaviruses, with each representing a novel species. An evolutionary analysis of all known hantaviruses including the novel viruses described here reveals the existence of four distinct phylogenetic groups of viruses that infect a range of mammalian hosts, and which have sometimes exchanged genes through segment reassortment. Our analysis also suggests that hantaviruses might have first appeared in bats or insectivores, before spreading to rodents, even though rodents are currently the best documented hosts of hantaviruses. Because the phylogenetic trees of the hantaviruses do not always match those of their mammalian hosts, we conclude that both host-jumping and co-divergence have played important roles in hantavirus evolution. Overall, our study shows that bats are likely to be important natural reservoir hosts of hantaviruses from which novel hantaviruses may emerge in the future.

 


Via Ed Rybicki
Karen Soucie's insight:

SV40, BTV, Hedgehog, Visna Virus it's all coming together.

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Ed Rybicki's curator insight, February 8, 2013 1:42 PM

Rats and flying rats...fertile ground for viruses.

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Factors driving hantavirus emergence in Europe

Factors driving hantavirus emergence in Europe | Hantavirus | Scoop.it

Hantaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in Eurasia. In Europe both the amplitude and the magnitude of outbreaks of HFRS have increased. The mechanisms that drive the incidences are complex and multi-factorial and only partially due to increased awareness and improved diagnostic tools. Risk determinants include reservoir ecology, virus ecology and anthropogenic factors. The dogma of one specific rodent species as primordial reservoir for a specific hantavirus is increasingly challenged. New hantaviruses have been discovered in shrews, moles and bats and increasing evidence points at host-switching events and co-circulation in multiple, sympatric reservoir species, challenging the strict rodent–virus co-evolution theory. Changing landscape attributes and climatic parameters determine fluctuations in hantavirus epidemiology, for instance through increased food availability, prolonged virus survival and decreased biodiversity.

 


Via Ed Rybicki
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Ed Rybicki's curator insight, March 7, 2013 12:58 AM

There WILL be more of this: and viruses that were curiosities of teh developing world, will suddenly get attention from the more monied countries.  And hopefully, vaccines too.

Rescooped by Karen Soucie from Stratech Scientific Ltd.
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Product Focus: Anti-Sheep IgG Light Chain Specific

Product Focus: Anti-Sheep IgG Light Chain Specific | Hantavirus | Scoop.it
For Protein Detection on Western Blots after Immunoprecipitation When labeled secondary antibodies specific for both heavy and light chains of IgG, e.g. anti-IgG (H+L), are used to detect protein b...

Via Stratech Scientific
Karen Soucie's insight:

Sometmes what you can't see with your eyes you can feel with your heart.  Heavy heart light chains.

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Rescooped by Karen Soucie from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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Plant Cell: Clathrin Light Chains Regulate Clathrin-Mediated Trafficking, Auxin Signaling, and Development in Arabidopsis

Plant Cell: Clathrin Light Chains Regulate Clathrin-Mediated Trafficking, Auxin Signaling, and Development in Arabidopsis | Hantavirus | Scoop.it

"Recent studies have demonstrated that auxin transport and signaling are highly dependent on clathrin-mediated endocytosis for the plasma membrane polar localization of auxin efflux transporters, PINs, and that clathirn-mediated endocytosis of PINs is itself regulated by auxin and AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN1 (ABP1). Our time-resolved analysis of auxin effects on clathrin-mediated trafficking has both confirmed that ABP1 regulates clathirn-mediated endocytosis in an auxin-dependent manner and provided further mechanistic insight into clathrin-mediated trafficking in plant cells."


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