Hannah's Semester1 PDH
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Body image worries plaguing young kids

Body image worries plaguing young kids | Hannah's Semester1 PDH | Scoop.it
Eating disorders affect as many as 1 in 10 women, but concerns over body image are also showing up in children.
Hannah Reveley's insight:

This article from the 12th of February 2012 explores new research finding that children as young as 10 years old are beginning to suffer from eating disorders. 

The influence of older siblings, friends, the news, magazines and TV programs all contribute to very young kids being subject to judging their bodies and comparing themselves with other people.

I think at that age, kids tend to look up to their favourite celebrities for inspiration. If those celebrities are then focused on body image, or are being scrutinized by a magazine for how much they weigh or the diet they are on, children pick up on it and start to view things differently.

 

The article mentions this particular statistic:

One quarter of the cases of disordered eating are in children under 12!
It's really awful how kids can develop conditions like this, and is really due to influence by older people. 
"We estimate that one in 200 women have anorexia while as many as 20 per cent have disordered eating." 

 

It's really surprising how observant kids are, and adults need to be aware of that. I think, although the article hasn't mentioned this, that magazine editors need to be mindful who their possible audience is as to what information and comments they include in their magazines eg: Dolly and Girlfriend.

 

This relates to us in PDH class because we're learning about healthy lifestyles. This includes enjoying eating enough of the wide range of healthy foods available to us to meet our energy needs, drinking enough water each day, and getting daily exercise.

 

It's really up to the friends and family of the child experiencing the eating disorder to notice the changes, to talk to them and make sure they get the counselling and help they need. 

It's shown that "70 per cent of children who receive family therapy will recover, and the earlier treatment is started the better."


I think children, girls and boys, should be taught the signs of eating disorders at an age around 12, so that they can keep an eye on their friends, making sure that they are okay, eating properly and behaving as they normally would.

This article is really interesting and has opened my eyes to how I might act around younger kids, including my brother.

 

 

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Report finds 7 in 10 teens ignorant about contraception

Report finds 7 in 10 teens ignorant about contraception | Hannah's Semester1 PDH | Scoop.it
There is a call for better sex education after a report found many teenagers are ignorant about contraception.
Hannah Reveley's insight:

 - Article from 10th of August 2013.

Areas of Australia that have been recorded to have the highest teenage pregnancy rates need to be addressed, to come to terms with what the causes of the numbers may be.

In this case, Tasmania has been identified, and this article explains the problem of teenagers not taking their sex education lessons seriously, thus not learning about protection against unwanted pregnancies and STI's.

 

I believe the most effective way to get teenagers to listen is to make the lessons compulsory if not already, and prepare examinations for the topics, because then they will need to study and listen in class in order to get good marks.

 

This article raises good points, including the reasons some teenagers are not listening to their classes, one of which being that they feel embarrassed and uncomfortable placed in that environment, perhaps with other students. 

It doesn't mention the ages of teenagers who are having these sex education classes made available to them; 14 year olds or 17 year olds? It depends on the ages and maturity levels of the teenagers as to whether they take the information offered to them seriously or not.

Ultimately it is the fault of the teenagers, but they might need help seeing the necessity and importance of information on pregnancy and contraception. As a teenager myself I know that it's hard to take classes like these seriously, especially when I have not faced anything that has been described.

 

But in relevance to my class at school, I find it is very effective that we are split into gender groups for our PDHPE theory classes because the room takes on a level of maturity and nobody seems scared or embarrassed to put their hand up and ask a question, or share a story.

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Teen pregnancies back on the rise

Teen pregnancies back on the rise | Hannah's Semester1 PDH | Scoop.it
The number of births to teenage mothers in Australia has jumped after decades of steady decline, with a 10 per cent increase nationally.
Hannah Reveley's insight:

 - Article from August 29th 2010.

I agree with the professors quoted in the article, because we tend to categorise 'teenagers' to be 15 or 16 years old , but need to remember that a lot of them are probably 18 - 19; adults who are finished high school, some of whom might have planned their pregnancies.

To look at these huge numbers of teen mums and harshly judge and criticize them is to stand on a pedestal and mock those shorter than us - horrible and unjust.

 

This article has come up with a reason for these high numbers of teenage pregnancies, and has in doing so raised a popular point; children are not being educated enough, and are not taught how to handle peer pressure or real-life situations, in this case, the subject being sex education, doing only 'medium-well'.
Basically, the available support and education for teenage girls (and boys) in and out of school is not to a very high standard and is clearly not paying off if kids are having more 'risky sex' than recorded before.

 

This relates to our classwork because we have been talking about risk-taking situations that teenagers particularly, face as they head into adulthood.

We have discussed that the reason why PDHPE is compulsory is because we need to be as supported as possible, with information and guidance as we start to face hard decisions in life and need to fend for ourselves. 

Education in sex, drugs and alcohol is particularly important because we will highly likely face all of these at some point soon and have to know the consequences, tips and tricks to take them seriously and defend our health and safety.

 

 

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Young Australians paid to have STD test

Young Australians paid to have STD test | Hannah's Semester1 PDH | Scoop.it
Young people will be paid to get tested for chlamydia under an Australian-first initiative.
Hannah Reveley's insight:

This newspaper article from early 2011 explains the reasoning behind a new initiative in the ACT to pay young people to get STD tests, specifically testing for chlamydia. 
Chlamydia is a sexually transmitted disease with no symptoms which, if caught early, can be treated easily with antibiotics. But if left  too late, can have unwelcome long-term effects.


Health Care Professors at Australia's national university came up with the idea - certain pharmacies would pay people aged 16-30 who thought they were eligible, ten dollars to be tested for chlamydia at the pharmacy.  

 

The hope was that (seeing the rates of Chlamydia had been going up in the past decade) it would boost the number of test recipients, and then the researchers could see any more trends, increases or decreases in the number of people with chlamydia.

 

This relates to our sub-topic on STD's because we are learning about how they are transmitted, what types there are and what short and long term effects they can have. 

 

Although the article doesn't say, I think the cause of this idea came from the fact that not many people want to have STD tests, as the thought may be found embarrassing. 

I personally think that resorting to using money as bribery was a big step, with payouts possibly reaching $6000, and maybe advertisements could have been used instead to try and encourage people to take the tests.

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Living with HIV in 2013 - Health & Wellbeing

Living with HIV in 2013 - Health & Wellbeing | Hannah's Semester1 PDH | Scoop.it
Hannah Reveley's insight:

This article from 2013 assesses the medical treatment available for those living with HIV. It also briefly looks at the treatment available in past decades.

HIV would have ruined the life of anyone diagnosed with it in the 1980's, but today the technologies and treatments available mean that living to a ripe old age is becoming quite accessible for those living with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

(HIV is a virus that causes the disease AIDS, and affects the white blood cells that help the body fight off disease.)

 

I believe it is fantastic for this article to recognise the achievements of modern medicine, and to take a positive perspective on HIV, which affects around 25,700 Australians.

I cannot speak from experience, but those who are affected by the virus would I'm sure be very shocked, and as John Manwaring was mentioned in the article, might fear the worst for themselves.

But, as Deanna Blegg was also mentioned, those people can now afford to live happy, long and fulfilling lives, thanks to doctor's and scientists' development of reliable medical treatment.

 

This relates to what we have been studying in class because one of our subtopics is on HIV/AIDS and this article outlines the consequences, yet also the developments for positively diagnosed people.

 

This article for me was really informative and I have learnt quite a bit, because before reading it I had previously dismissed HIV and AIDS as unheard of in developed countries, and I thought that if you had it, then there was nothing that could really be done. It turns out I had the picture all muddled and I'm glad this site was available!

 

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NSW University study: half of teenagers do not drink alcohol

NSW University study: half of teenagers do not drink alcohol | Hannah's Semester1 PDH | Scoop.it
MORE than half the nation’s teenagers are shunning alcohol to become teetotallers as the internet consumes more of their time.
Hannah Reveley's insight:

 - Article from April 10th 2014.

If the rates of teenagers becoming involved in activities involving alcohol consumption are dropping, then teenagers are not being placed in such dangerous or risky environments as much as they used to.

As represented in this article, teens are now seen to be looking towards social media and the internet for entertainment, which although brings with it its own risks, such as cyber-bullying, I believe the risks are much lower and less common than those associated with underage drinking. So therefore in my opinion it is much safer to spend some time on a smartphone than drink alcohol underage.

 

This article has made me consider what I have learnt in class; the risks of underage drinking, their effects and consequences on the lives of teenagers. It was really interesting to see that technology is overtaking past activities common of teenagers, such as drinking alcohol and taking drugs, and it is something new I've learnt.

 

This relates to our topics in class because we have been looking at statistics of teenage drinking, its short and long term consequences and some strategies to help minimise it. This article represents a strategy for kids, I think, to not be involved with alcohol; connect on social media!

 

Unlike most news stories, this article is quite positive as it states facts, and leaves me feeling proud of the way we are starting to see alcohol and drugs as they really are.

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Lockout laws put to the test

Lockout laws put to the test | Hannah's Semester1 PDH | Scoop.it
Sydney's nightclubbing district was unusually quiet and incident-free as the O'Farrell government's nightclub lockout laws came into effect over the week, however Kings Cross business owners felt the sting.
Hannah Reveley's insight:

 - Article from 1st March 2014.
The new lockout laws put in place for Sydney's pubs, bars and clubs have so far seen positive outcomes in terms of safety of the public. There has reportedly been a decrease in the number of alcohol related incidents occurring late at night on Sydney's streets, particularly around Kings Cross.

Police services have confirmed that the public has been compliant with these new laws, which are proving effective to reduce alcohol fueled violence and assault.

But bar and club owners are feeling the effects of these laws, because people, other than the ones already  inside, are now banned from entering after 1:30 am. This means severe drops in numbers and purchases for the bars, pubs and clubs.. The other significant law, of no alcohol to be served after 3:00 am, takes its toll also on these businesses, as they will not be able to make their usual totals of money - possibly leading to their downfall.

This article shows owners kicking up a fuss at the new lockout laws, for the consequences to their business.

 

I believe these club and bar owners are seeing the negatives of the new lockout laws, obviously because their incomes will be affected.  But I think it is necessary for them to see that levels of violence will significantly decrease, as already seen on the first weekend that the laws were enforced, which I personally believe overrules any small decreases in money businesses may receive. - For, the greater good of the health and well-being of the public is more important than the money reeled in in the early hours of the morning between 3 am and 5 am.

 

This article relates to what we are studying in class because we have been learning about harm minimisation strategies for nights out - and this article specifically features a newly enforced law put in place as a strategy to minimise harm in the public. 

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Alcohol blamed for cancers

Alcohol blamed for cancers | Hannah's Semester1 PDH | Scoop.it
A FRESH analysis of cancer rates in Australia suggests alcohol is to blame for many more cases than previously thought.
Hannah Reveley's insight:

This article from the 2nd of May 2011, shows that, in 2011, Cancer Council Australia released updated information linking alcohol consumption to types of cancers, with this new position showing one of the figures to be that  22% of breast cancers were caused/affected by drinking alcohol.
Their past facts and figures had been significantly under the more accurate estimates by 2 - 7 times.

 

The Cancer Council has then been seen as giving another reason for people to listen to and abide by Australia's healthy drinking guidelines, but they actually warn that you cannot drink alcohol and have no increased risk of cancer -
"warned there was no safe level of alcohol intake"
- which seems to contradict their point that people should stick to Australia's healthy drinking guidelines.

 

It relates to our subject on the effects of alcohol consumption and binge drinking because it gives some serious consequences on excessively drinking alcohol over a long period of time.
It gives statistics that will definitely be listened to and taken into consideration.

 

After reading this article I get the impression that it is very important and contains information vital for the public to know about. I can see it would have had an impact on many people and some would have benefited from this journal article, but I think it over exaggerates. 

This article is very convincing, with statistics and research given from many reliable sources, but I think exaggerates quite a lot, such as in the line: 
"5663 cancers a year likely to be triggered by regular drinking even at moderate levels."
The word 'likely' suggests that regular drinking even at moderate levels does not trigger 5663 cancers per year. 

These kinds of sentences are included in articles to engage their attention. But, I think they have gone a bit overboard with this article and to me it seems to be designed to play with people's minds and scare them into stopping drinking altogether.

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