Hannah Kish Amendment 4
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Man With 4th Amendment Written on Chest Sues Over Airport Arrest | Threat Level | Wired.com

Man With 4th Amendment Written on Chest Sues Over Airport Arrest | Threat Level | Wired.com | Hannah Kish Amendment 4 | Scoop.it
A 21-year-old Virginia man who wrote an abbreviated version of the Fourth Amendment on his body and stripped to his shorts at an airport security scree
Hannah Kish's insight:

A college student wrote a shortened version of the Fourth Amendment on his chest and stripped down to his shorts at an airport. He is demanding money for disorderly conduct. He was handcuffed behind his back and was held for almost 90 minutes by the Transportation Security Administration.He refused to go through the x-ray machienes and wanted to do the pat down instead. After asking him what his intentions were, prosecutors dropped the charges because he was only on his way to his grandmother's funeral. 

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Fourth Amendment Dead in Los Angeles

Fourth Amendment Dead in Los Angeles | Hannah Kish Amendment 4 | Scoop.it
Kurt Nimmo | America's founding principles now extinct.
Hannah Kish's insight:

This article shows that police do not always follow the constitution like they are supposed to. The police woman decided to stop a person in a rental car. She threatened to search the car because he was all "tatted up" but couldn't because she didn't have a search warrant. She didn't even witness a crime. 

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Supreme Court on warrantless searches: Ruling gives police too much leeway

Supreme Court on warrantless searches: Ruling gives police too much leeway | Hannah Kish Amendment 4 | Scoop.it
One of the most important functions of the Supreme Court is to put legal limits on police excesses. But the court failed to fulfill that responsibility last week when it widened a loophole in the...
Hannah Kish's insight:

Police usually need a warrant to enter a home and search. When there are "exigent circumstances" police do not need a warrant to enter. Examples are imminent danger, the possibility that a suspect will escape or concern about the immediate destruction of evidence. It does not violoate the constitution if the police officer's actions are lawful. The police in this article were wrong because if they did not bang on the door, the drug users would not have to destroy their evidence and the police would have time to get a warrant and arrest them. 

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The Fourth Amendment Explained: The Constitution for Dummies Series

Continuing the Constitution for Dummies Series with the Bill of Rights and Amendment 4. Explained simply so you can understand the Constitution of the United...
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This is a video of Keith Huges explaing the constitution. He tells you what constitues search and seizure, if you have enough evidence what does it rise to in terms of probable cause, and what happens if the police ignore this amendment. Before you even get a warrant to search, there is an individual expectation of privacy and society also expects that. He goes through everything there is to know about the Fourth Amendment. 

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Fourth Amendment (United States Constitution)

Fourth Amendment (United States Constitution) | Hannah Kish Amendment 4 | Scoop.it
Amendment (1791) to the Constitution of the United States, part of the Bill of Rights, that forbids unreasonable searches and seizures of individuals and property. For the text of the Fourth Amendment,...
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This website talks about how the Fourth Amendment is the foundation of criminal law jurisprudence. It articulates both the rights of people and the responsibilities of the law enforcers. The protections granted by the U.S. Supreme Court have expanded throughout time. An example is Mapp v. Ohio. Law Enforcement officials are only allowed to search when they have a good reason or a warrant.  

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Police seizure of text messages violated 4th Amendment, judge rules

Police seizure of text messages violated 4th Amendment, judge rules | Hannah Kish Amendment 4 | Scoop.it
But legality of warrantless cell phone seizures is still unsettled nationwide.
Hannah Kish's insight:

This article is showing that even if police find important evidence, it does not count if they did not have a search warrant. Trisha Oliver called the police because her son Marco stopped breathing. He deid 11 hours after. The police went to Trisha's house to talk to her and they found a really important piece of evidence on her cell phone. The court had to decide whether to use it because the police had violated the Forth Amendment. 

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Los Angeles police search to be reviewed by Supreme Court

Los Angeles police search to be reviewed by Supreme Court | Hannah Kish Amendment 4 | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON -- A 2009 police search of a Los Angeles gang member's home will be examined Wednesday by the Supreme Court in a case that could further define Americans' 4th Amendment protections.
Hannah Kish's insight:

If the objecting party is not present in a search warrant, the consent from one resident of a home is enough to override the objection. A victim got stabbed and robbed and after he called the police, they saw the robber running up a flight of stairs. The police when to the residence and a woman opened the door. The women was bruised and bleeding so the police took the man into custody. The woman let them search their home but the man tried to fight it and say if was unconstitutional but it wasn't. 

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Facebook, cell phones and the 4th Amendment

W&M law professors Paul Marcus, Adam Gershowitz and Jeff Bellim discuss law-enforcement search and seizure regarding cell phones and other electronic devices.
Hannah Kish's insight:

This video is about technology and how it relates to the law. Police are allowed to search your wallet or your purse without violating the Fourth Amendment because the court decided they were containers. Police are able to search anything on your phone during an arrest without a warrant because some courts decided that they are just electronic containers. Police are also looking at social media like Facebook and Twitter. They are allowed to use anything you post on websites like that against you.  

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Fourth Amendment

Fourth Amendment | Hannah Kish Amendment 4 | Scoop.it
Definition of Fourth Amendment in the Legal Dictionary by TheFreeDictionary.com
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This website describes the Fourth Amendment in detail. A search is only valid if the warrant is directed towards specific goods and houses. If police want to search someone's house, they must have a warrant. If they enter anyway, whatever they find will be suppressed.  Warrants have to specificaly describe the person and the place being searched. 

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The 4th Amendment

Hannah Kish's insight:

This website says the Fourth Amendment is "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized." This right that all people have cannot be violated. The police must have a good reason to search anything that belongs to you. They have to also convince a judge that it is a good enough reason. If a police officer catches someone committing a crime, they do not have to talk to a judge first. They can arrest you right then. 

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