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Pacaya - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Pacaya is an active complex volcano in Guatemala, which first erupted approximately 23,000 years ago and has erupted at least 23 times since the Spanish invasion of Guatemala. Pacaya rises to an elevation of 2,552 metres (8,373 ft).[1] After being dormant for a century, it erupted violently in 1965 and has been erupting continuously since then. Much of its activity is Strombolian, but occasional Plinian eruptions also occur, sometimes showering the any of the nearby Departments with ash.[1]

Pacaya is a popular tourist attraction. Pacaya lies 30 kilometers (19 miles) southwest of Guatemala City and close to Antigua.[2] The volcano sits inside the Escuintla Department.[2][3]

So far, the last activity reported has been the eruption that peaked on May 27, 2010, causing ash to rain down in Guatemala City, Antigua and Escuintla.

Guatemala has many volcanos.  Pacaya is one of the active ones.  It has erupted at least 23 times since the Spanish Invasion.  Its activity is almost continuous.  This being said, it is a popular place for tourism.  

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Fun Facts

Fun Facts | Guatemala, Jordan Fox | Scoop.it

Guatemala means "Land of Trees" in Myan tongue.  Many native tribes that speak their own language still reside in Guatemala.  The highest mountain in Guatemala is the Tajamulco volcano. Guatamala is where blue jeans were first made.  Guatemala is the largest Latin America country population-wise. 

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10 Day Weather Forecast for Guatemala - weather.com

10 Day Weather Forecast for Guatemala - weather.com | Guatemala, Jordan Fox | Scoop.it

Unfortunately, Guatemala is about as equally as warm as NC has been lately.  It is only unfortunate because cold weather is so nice! Seemingly, it is always at least partly sunny.  It doesn't have much rain, it seems.  Apparently, though, according to a different website, Guatemala does get rain.  The wind ranges between 15-20mph.

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Famous People | Guatemala On The Web

Famous People | Guatemala On The Web | Guatemala, Jordan Fox | Scoop.it

Ricardo Arjona is a very famous singer and songwriter in Guatemala. He is a grammy international winner.  Rigoberta Menchu is a human rights activast who won the Nobel Peace Prize.  Tecun Uman is known mostly in Guatemala, for he is their official national hero. Abdon Rodriguez Zea is a famous baseball sportscaster. 

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Timeline

Timeline | Guatemala, Jordan Fox | Scoop.it

In 1823, Guatemala became part of the United Proviences of Central America. In 1839, Guatemala became fully independent.  In 1941, Guatemala declared war on the Axis Powers.  In 1970, the military-backed Carlos Arena was elected president.  In May of 2007, Guatemala ratifies an international adoption treaty, committing it to ensure that babies are not bought or stolen.

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Agriculture - Guatemala - export, area, crops, annual

Agriculture - Guatemala - export, area, crops, annual | Guatemala, Jordan Fox | Scoop.it

In 1998, 17.5% of the land area in Guatemala was used for crops.  Agriculture makes up for 75% of export earnings.   It also employs 50% of the labor force.  The important cash crops are coffee, sugar, bananas and cottons.  Followed by those is hemp oil.  All very important crops to Guatemala!

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Guatemala Religion

Guatemala Religion | Guatemala, Jordan Fox | Scoop.it

There is no countrywide religion.  However, 35-40% of Guatemalans consider themselves Evangelical Christians.  Their constitution recognizes the distinct legal personality of the Catholic Church.  Some people in this country feel strongly about religion.  Many others, on the other hand, are indifferent about religion in Guatemala.

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Guatemala Literacy Rate

The literacy rate in Guatemala is 50%.  That rate includes all citizens.  The illerate population over 15 years of age is 45%. The illerate female population over age 15 is 52.9%.  This shows that more girls than guys are illerate in Guatemala.

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Guatemala, Guatemala: Country name and capital

Guatemala (US Listeni/ˌɡwɑːtəˈmɑːlə/ GWAH-tə-MAH-lə, UK /ˌɡwætɪˈmɑːlə/ GWA-ti-MAH-lə), officially the Republic of Guatemala (Spanish: República de Guatemala [reˈpuβlika ðe ɣwateˈmala]), is a country in Central America bordered by Mexico to the north and west, the Pacific Ocean to the southwest, Belize to the northeast, the Caribbean to the east, and Honduras and El Salvador to the southeast. Its area is 108,890 km2 (42,043 mi2) with an estimated population of 13,276,517.

A representative democracy, its capital is Nueva Guatemala de la Asunción, also known as Guatemala City. Guatemala's abundance of biologically significant and unique ecosystems contributes to Mesoamerica's designation as a biodiversity hotspot.[5] The former Mayan civilization was a Mesoamerican civilization, which continued throughout the Post-Classic period until the arrival of the Spanish. They had lived in Guatemala, Honduras, Belize, the southern part of Mexico and eastern parts of El Salvador.

Guatemala became independent from Spain in 1821. After it became an independent country in its own right, it was ruled by a series of dictators, assisted by the United Fruit Company. The late 20th century saw Guatemala embroiled in a 36-year-long civil war. Following the war, Guatemala has witnessed both economic growth and successful democratic elections. In the most recent election, held in 2011, Otto Pérez Molina of the Patriotic Party won the presidency.

The name of my country I am doing the project on is Guatemala.  Ironically, Guatemala is also the name of the capital of the country I am doing my project on.  I have actually been to Guatemala before, too!  Myans are known for settling.  There are even Myan ruins in Guatemala!

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Guatemala Flag

Guatemala Flag | Guatemala, Jordan Fox | Scoop.it

Guatemala Flag has light blue stripes on both sides. It has a white band in the center. It has the 'coat of arms’ in the middle. It was made the National flag of Guatemala in 1871.  It has leaves in the middle too.

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Demographics of Guatemala

Mestizos (mixed Amerindian-Spanish - in local Spanish called Ladino) and Europeans comprise 22.0% of the population. Amerindians comprise 65.0% of the population.  Pure Europeans comprise 5.0% of the population.  Most of Guatemalas population is rural, but more and more is becoming urban.

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Tikal - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Tikal (or Tik’al according to the modern Mayan orthography) is one of the largest archaeological sites and urban centres of the pre-Columbian Maya civilization. It is located in the archaeological region of the Petén Basin in what is now northern Guatemala. Situated in the department of El Petén, the site is part of Guatemala's Tikal National Park and in 1979 it was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site.[2]

Tikal was the capital of a conquest state that became one of the most powerful kingdoms of the ancient Maya.[3] Though monumental architecture at the site dates back as far as the 4th century BC, Tikal reached its apogee during the Classic Period, ca. 200 to 900 AD. During this time, the city dominated much of the Maya region politically, economically, and militarily, while interacting with areas throughout Mesoamerica such as the great metropolis of Teotihuacan in the distant Valley of Mexico. There is evidence that Tikal was conquered by Teotihuacan in the 4th century AD.[4] Following the end of the Late Classic Period, no new major monuments were built at Tikal and there is evidence that elite palaces were burned. These events were coupled with a gradual population decline, culminating with the site’s abandonment by the end of the 10th century.

Tikal is the best understood of any of the large lowland Maya cities, with a long dynastic ruler list, the discovery of the tombs of many of the rulers on this list and the investigation of their monuments, temples and palaces.[5]

Tikal is the name of the Myan ruins that reside in Guatemala.  It is one of the largest Myan sites.   Tikal came from the name of a powerful conquest state that became the most powerful kingdom in Myan history.  It could have been built as far back as 1000BC.  People were often at war at this site. 

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Star Wars Scene

Star Wars Scene | Guatemala, Jordan Fox | Scoop.it

Being my second favorite series of movies, I got excited when I heard that a scene from Star Wars was filmed in Guatemala!  A New Hope was the movie it was in.  It was shot in  Tikal National Park.  This is where the pyramid is.  The myans settled and build the ruins/pyramid.

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Guatemala: Tourist Attractions

Guatemala is known for its Myan pyramid, Tiekal.  It is also famous for markets.  There is one part of Guatemala that is a cute little town you can only reach by boat. There is also a real active volcanoe.  The tourism opportunities in Guatemala are endless!

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Fireworks for New Years Day in Guatemala 2012

New Years Day is very important in Guatemala.  It is also very important here in the US.  They celebrate similar to us, honestly.  Fireworks, drinking, celebrations and everything!  It almost seems as if it really is an even bigger event than it is here in the US, and thats hard to beat!

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Important Industries

Guatemala is the most populous of the Central American countries with a GDP per capita roughly one-third that of Argentina, Brazil, and Chile.[citation needed] Coffee, sugar, and bananas are the main products.[citation needed] The 1996 signing of peace accords, which ended 36 years of civil war, removed a major obstacle to foreign investment, and Guatemala since then has pursued important reforms and macroeconomic stabilization.[citation needed] On 1 July 2006, the Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA) entered into force between the US and Guatemala and has since spurred increased investment in the export sector.[citation needed] The distribution of income remains highly unequal with 12% of the population living below the international poverty line.[7] Given Guatemala's large expatriate community in the United States, it is the top remittance recipient in Central America, with inflows serving as a primary source of foreign income equivalent to nearly two-thirds of exports.

Guatemala's Gross domestic product for 2000 was estimated at $19.1 billion, with real growth slowing to approximately 3.3%. After the signing of the final peace accord in December 1996, Guatemala was well-positioned for rapid economic growth over the next 10 years.

Guatemala's economy is dominated by the private sector, which generates about 85% of GDP.[citation needed] Most manufacturing is light assembly and food processing, geared to the domestic, U.S., and Central American markets. Over the past several years, tourism and exports of textiles, apparel, and nontraditional agricultural products such as winter vegetables, fruit, and cut flowers have boomed, while more traditional exports such as sugar, bananas, and coffee continue to represent a large share of the export market.[citation needed]

One important industry in Guatemala is the coal industry.  This is also a very important industry in many other countries.  Machine building, on the other hand, is a less common industry but is Guatemala's second largest industry. Textiles, footware and appareal, and toys are all made in Guatemala, as well.  Often times, much of Guatemala's material items made there are exported places like the US!

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GUATEMALA FOOD

Obviously, peppers are seemingly a big food in Guatemala.  They have them in bright, vibrant colors of all kinds!  They have a lot of meat and vegetable stew.  Breaded, pan-fried pork chops are apparently big in Guatemala as well!  Banana bread is huge treat for dessert!

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Guatemala Government type - Government

Guatemala Government type - Government | Guatemala, Jordan Fox | Scoop.it

The Guatemalan government is a constutional democratic republic.  A constitutional democracy is "a form of government in which the sovereign power of the people is spelled out in a governing constitution."  A republic is "a representative democracy in which the people's elected deputies (representatives), not the people themselves, vote on legislation."  Guatemala is a happy medium of those two.  Essentially, they are a combination of both.

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GTQ - Guatemalan Quetzal rates and currency

GTQ - Guatemalan Quetzal rates and currency | Guatemala, Jordan Fox | Scoop.it

The Guatemalan form of currency is the Quetzal.  The most popular Guatemalan exchange rate is US dollars to Guatemalan quetzals. Their currency symbol is a "Q."  The abbreviation of their currency is GTQ. One Guatemalan quetzal is worth .1268 USD.

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President of Guatemala | Current Heads of State & First Ladies

President of Guatemala | Current Heads of State & First Ladies | Guatemala, Jordan Fox | Scoop.it

Otto Fernando Pérez Molina is the president of Guatemala.  He is a retired military officer.  On January 14, 2012 he became the President.  He lost the 2007 Election, but in 2011 he ran again and won.  He served as the Director of Military Intelligence, Presidential Chief of Staff for President Ramiro de Leon Carpio, and as chief representative of the military for the Guatemalan Peace Accords.

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Guatemala Area - Geography

Guatemala Area - Geography | Guatemala, Jordan Fox | Scoop.it

108,889 square miles is how big Guatemala is.  The land takes up 107,159 square miles of that.  This includes all surfaces inside of the Guatemala boarders.  Water takes up 1,730 square miles of that.  This includes inland bodies of water, such as lakes, rivers, etc.

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Map of Guatemala - Central American Countries, Guatemala Maps Facts History - World Atlas

Map of Guatemala - Central American Countries, Guatemala Maps Facts History - World Atlas | Guatemala, Jordan Fox | Scoop.it

Guatemala is in Central America. Mexico, Honduras, and Belize are around it.  Part of it boarders the Caribbean Sea.  It is below the United States.  It is still above the equator.

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