Growing To Be A Better Communicator
10.8K views | +0 today
Follow
Growing To Be A Better Communicator
Creative communication skills
Curated by Bobby Dillard
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Leadership Lite
Scoop.it!

The Top Three Communication Issues That Hold Leaders Back

The Top Three Communication Issues That Hold Leaders Back | Growing To Be A Better Communicator | Scoop.it
The top three communication issues that hold leaders back: 63% - Not recognizing employee achievement. 57% - Not giving clear direction. 52% - Not having time to meet with employees. (Source: Interact/Harris Poll) 5 ways to recognize achievement: Don’t give a trophy for everything. Give recognition for achievements. You demotivate top performers when you recognize…

Via Kevin Watson
more...
Ian Berry's curator insight, February 12, 9:53 PM
The headline says it all When you'r not sure ask. For me even if you know still ask others!
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Just Story It
Scoop.it!

Why Storyshowing Beats Storytelling Every Time 

Why Storyshowing Beats Storytelling Every Time  | Growing To Be A Better Communicator | Scoop.it
Sam Cawthorn is The Young Australian of the Year, The Edupreneur of the Year, Australia Day ambassador, 7 times international bestseller and also a professional speaker that has spoken in 36 counties.

Via Dr. Karen Dietz
more...
Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, February 1, 7:12 PM

OK -- I like most of this interview with Sam Cawthorn. Except for his silly distinction between storytelling and storyshowing. It's a load of hooey.

 

Anybody who knows authentic storytelling knows that "story showing" automatically happens -- because when you are reliving your experience, you are conveying visuals automatically. Your audience can then see and experience what you did.

 

When that is NOT happening, you are sharing a simple series of events: I went to the store, I bought some break, I made a sandwich. That's not storytelling.

 

That being said, I do like the rest of what Cawthorn shares. He talks about leaders preaching instead of inspiring. Right on. 

 

He also makes a fab point that great storytelling is not about the content, it's about the delivery! Yet most people focus mostly on the content and forget the delivery. The result? Mediocre storytelling or an actual epic fail.

 

Read more and please -- just don't get hooked into his dumb "we've been told to do it wrong!" storyshowing stuff.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. 

Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Teaching Business Presentations in a Business Communication Course
Scoop.it!

How to Be a Presentation Ninja: 10 Steps to Becoming a Public Speaking Hero

How to Be a Presentation Ninja: 10 Steps to Becoming a Public Speaking Hero | Growing To Be A Better Communicator | Scoop.it

"Because of the nature of my job, I give a lot of presentations and, as a result, I get asked this a lot: what makes for a good a presentation."


Via Bovee & Thill's Online Business Communication Magazines
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Teaching Visual Communication in a Business Communication Course
Scoop.it!

Data Storytelling: The Ultimate Collection of Resources

Data Storytelling: The Ultimate Collection of Resources | Growing To Be A Better Communicator | Scoop.it

The hot new concept in data visualization is "data storytelling."


Via Bovee & Thill's Online Business Communication Magazines
more...
Bovee & Thill's Online Business Communication Magazines's curator insight, May 22, 2017 11:03 AM

Here are some important questions about data storytelling:

  • Is data storytelling more than a catchy phrase?
  • Where does data storytelling fit into the broader landscape of data exploration, visualization, and presentation?
  • How can the traditional tools of storytelling improve how we communicate with data?
  • Is it more about story-telling or story-finding? . . .

 

Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Digital Delights - Digital Tribes
Scoop.it!

TED's secret to great public speaking

TED's secret to great public speaking | Growing To Be A Better Communicator | Scoop.it
There's no single formula for a great talk, but there is a secret ingredient that all the best ones have in common. TED curator Chris Anderson shares this secret -- along with four ways to make it work for you. Do you have what it takes to share an idea worth spreading?

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from How to find and tell your story
Scoop.it!

Infographic: The Seven Standards of Storytelling at Work | Alive with Ideas

Infographic: The Seven Standards of Storytelling at Work | Alive with Ideas | Growing To Be A Better Communicator | Scoop.it

"In our latest infographic, we share some of the ways that storytelling can be weaved through our organisations with seven simple standards that will help you and your stakeholders communicate in a much more moving and meaningful way."

 

Read the full article to see the infographic & dig deeper into how to implement these 7 standards:

Select and collect your storiesMake them personalMake them interestingMake them relevantMake them emotionalRefine your structurePolish your stories
Via Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)
more...
Penelope's curator insight, January 26, 1:51 PM
This infographic can be helpful in crafting your story in all types of scenarios. Writing, speaking, blogging, etc. I especially love the idea of a "swipe file" of factual stories that you can pull from when writing your own.

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Digital Delights - Digital Tribes
Scoop.it!

10 Ingredients of a Knockout Presentation (Number 9 is Impossible)

10 Ingredients of a Knockout Presentation (Number 9 is Impossible) | Growing To Be A Better Communicator | Scoop.it
Speaking in public is terrifying. It's possible to overcome your fear and do standout presentations. Here are the 10 ingredients of knockout presentations.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Professional Communication
Scoop.it!

Forget Stock Photos, Use These 8 Social Media Graphic Design Tips Instead - Venngage

Forget Stock Photos, Use These 8 Social Media Graphic Design Tips Instead - Venngage | Growing To Be A Better Communicator | Scoop.it
I am a huge fan of social media, even in its current–somewhat chaotic–form. It has allowed people like myself to build a career and a community around their writing. Honestly, many writers I know would not be where they are without social media. But what I’m not a fan of is seeing the same terrible …

Via Rosário Durão
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bobby Dillard
Scoop.it!

4 Tricks to Keep Your Audience Interested

4 Tricks to Keep Your Audience Interested | Growing To Be A Better Communicator | Scoop.it
Here are 4 cool tricks to keep your audience engaged in your presentation, even if the topic i
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bobby Dillard
Scoop.it!

How to Turn Journal Ramblings into Viral Articles – Thrive Global

I’ve been journaling for the past 9 years and written about the several reasons journaling has changed my life HERE. People often ask me how I journal, wanting my specific methodology. The problem…
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bobby Dillard
Scoop.it!

The One Simple Strategy that will Supercharge Your Writing Productivity

Want to supercharge your writing productivity but feel like you struggle to concentrate when you sit down to write? It can be hard for us writers to find time to write in the first place, but when we…
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Digital Delights - Digital Tribes
Scoop.it!

6 Presentation "Tips" That Are Total BS

6 Presentation "Tips" That Are Total BS | Growing To Be A Better Communicator | Scoop.it
Beware! Rant approaching! Here are 6 BS presentation "tips" that you are likely to receive from presentation and communication "experts".

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bobby Dillard
Scoop.it!

The System I Used to Write 5 Books and Over 1,000 Blog Posts

Most writers struggle with getting their writing done for one surprising reason. They think writing is a one-step process, when in fact, it’s a three-step process. What we call “writing” is actually…
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Tech Leaders
Scoop.it!

6 secrets of master influencers

6 secrets of master influencers | Growing To Be A Better Communicator | Scoop.it

Put these tips to work, to avoid blunders and persuade with power.


Via Dr. Karen Dietz
more...
Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, February 1, 6:52 PM

Want practical ways to increase your influence? Then here are 6 solid mindsets and maxim's to follow.

 

The original title of this article, however, is terrible. Every point made is not about presentation skills. But it's NOT about presentation skills -- it's but about influence skills. So as you are reading, frame it this way for yourself.

 

My favorite tip is #2 -- a successful campaign to influence decisions happens before, during, and after the slide deck. Forget this at your peril.

 

Next point #3 is also a keeper -- get the lay of the land. In other words, adapt your presentation to your audience in real time. The example the author shares is brilliant.

 

Point #4 is also a gem -- but most people won't do it. Don't drown people in data. Just pick a few data slides. The rest is in the story of what the data actually means.

 

Go read the rest of this post to dig into these 6 ways to be more influential (not just a good presenter).

 

This review was published by Dr. Karen Dietz for her Tech Leaders curation: www.scoop.it/t/tech-leaders 

Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from All About Coaching
Scoop.it!

Criticism Is Not Feedback

Criticism Is Not Feedback | Growing To Be A Better Communicator | Scoop.it
There’s a huge difference between feedback and criticism. Feedback is helpful and constructive; criticism is hurtful and damaging.

Via Ariana Amorim
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Teaching Interpersonal Communication in a Business Communication Course
Scoop.it!

5 Ways to Improve Your Listening Skills

5 Ways to Improve Your Listening Skills | Growing To Be A Better Communicator | Scoop.it

Listening skills are essential to leadership that’s responsive, attentive and empathetic. Here’s how to sharpen yours."


Via Bovee & Thill's Online Business Communication Magazines
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Teaching a Modern Business Communication Course
Scoop.it!

20 Words That You're Probably Using Incorrectly

20 Words That You're Probably Using Incorrectly | Growing To Be A Better Communicator | Scoop.it
While definitions have been known to shift based on the way a word is commonly used, some popular uses are just plain wrong.

Via Bovee & Thill's Online Business Communication Magazines
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Digital Delights - Digital Tribes
Scoop.it!

Want to improve your communication? Heard about the Curse of Knowledge?

Want to improve your communication? Heard about the Curse of Knowledge? | Growing To Be A Better Communicator | Scoop.it
It describes a situation in which one party has more implicit knowledge about a certain topic and how this affects effective communication. I’d like to show you how to recognize it and what to do…

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
Penelope's comment, January 26, 9:41 AM
This was written about extensively in the book, "Made to Stick." Recommended for all who want to share their ideas.
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Digital Delights - Digital Tribes
Scoop.it!

11 Tricks to Grab Your Audience By the Eye Balls and Suck Them Into Your Presentation

11 Tricks to Grab Your Audience By the Eye Balls and Suck Them Into Your Presentation | Growing To Be A Better Communicator | Scoop.it
Let's face it. No one wants to be stuck in a meeting room on a Friday afternoon listening to Crappy McCrap bumbling about their latest project. There's paint drying somewhere that's way more interesting.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

How to Easily Write Faster Every Day, 15 Ways

How to Easily Write Faster Every Day, 15 Ways | Growing To Be A Better Communicator | Scoop.it
Does blogging take more time than you expected? 15 ways to write faster every day for free or for the cost of an egg timer.

Via Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, January 24, 12:32 PM
Infographics are so fun and I love how quickly you can grab a visual vs. slogging through a post. Great tips here to improve your writing speed and get more done!

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Personal Branding & Leadership Coaching
Scoop.it!

Presentation Skills: 9 Visual Communication Mistakes That Make You Look Stupid

Presentation Skills: 9 Visual Communication Mistakes That Make You Look Stupid | Growing To Be A Better Communicator | Scoop.it
Penguin doing the moonwalk while eating a banana. Here are the top 9 visual communication mistakes that make you look stupid in you

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Stefano Principato
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bobby Dillard
Scoop.it!

The secret structure of great talks

The secret structure of great talks | Growing To Be A Better Communicator | Scoop.it
From the "I have a dream" speech to Steve Jobs' iPhone launch, many great talks have a common structure that helps their message resonate with listeners. In this talk, presentation expert Nancy Duarte shares practical lessons on how to make a powerful call-to-action.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bobby Dillard
Scoop.it!

The Queen's Method: How Oprah Communicates So Well - Daniel Coyle

 
By now, you have heard how Oprah’s Golden Globes speech triggered a tsunami of emotion across America and the planet. In eight minutes, she achieved what every speaker and leader wants to create: an indelible, inspiring, and defining moment. What’s interesting, however, is to look more closely at precisely how she did it. Specifically, how … Continue reading "The Queen’s Method: How Oprah Communicates So Well"
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

May I Have a Word With You | #Communication #Honesty #Trust #Character #Reputation

May I Have a Word With You | #Communication #Honesty #Trust #Character #Reputation | Growing To Be A Better Communicator | Scoop.it
Communication matters. While a few words can make someone feel special, words poorly chosen have the power to kill a relationship or tarnish a reputation.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Frank+SONNENBERG

 


Via Gust MEES
more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, January 4, 4:32 PM
Communication matters. While a few words can make someone feel special, words poorly chosen have the power to kill a relationship or tarnish a reputation.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Frank+SONNENBERG

 

Art Lang's comment, January 5, 4:17 AM
Quote from the passage: “I’m Sorry.” When did the phrase “I’m sorry” morph into “I’m sorry, but…”? If you are sincerely sorry and want to apologize, then do so, without reservation. It takes an individual of true integrity to admit when he or she has erred. If you’re not truly sorry, why not just skip the apology and avoid compounding the problem?

Opinions: I think this is the modern generation expression of "yes, I am wrong, I should'nt have done what I did, but (even so you should'nt have done this or said this)/(I did'nt mean it this way or I did'nt want it to happen in this way)...". I feel that this individual is just trying to convey the fact that even though she or he does feel apologetic about what he or she has done, she feels that despite this, her mistakes does not negate the other party's mistake or she/he might have wanted to justify the reasons why she had done the things she had done, to avoid misunderstandingsa about the rationale of her actions. I do not feel that it compounds the problen, in fact I think that it makes a problem simpler, by clearing a misunderstanding. The problem might have been complicated earlier due to the misunderstanding, but once the misunderstanding is cleared, the problem is thus simplified.


Quote from the passage: “Please” and “Thank you.” Today’s economic downturn has spawned more cutthroat behavior with less time for courtesies.
Truth be told, with the same speed at which technology has swept the world, manners have been swept under the proverbial rug. I’m left wondering, is this rudeness the result of today’s angst or a trend of indifference that has evolved over time?
While it doesn’t take much effort to say “please” and “thank you,” some people forgo these pleasantries because they simply don’t know better, while others apparently feel these words are beneath their “pay grade.” How much effort does it take to show some gratitude for a job well done? (It’s not as if you’re being asked to solve world hunger.) The truth is, if you’re too busy to say “please” and “thank you,” don’t be surprised if others are too busy to help you in the future.


Opinions: I think this does not necessarily apply everywhere even though everybody's lifepace has quickened and this could be due to the environment in which one is working at. Also I feel that other than just looking at the surface of these issues, we should look into it and understand why it actually happens.
Firstly, I feel that it depends on the environment and the upbringing of the people. In working environments, where no common spirit are cultivated or not having a feeling of closeness with one colleagues may make certain people feel shy or not be able to relate to the people around them.
For example, if a healthy and a close-knitted working environment is cultivated, where everyone is friendly and close to each other, they will offer help in times of trouble or when one is busy due to the common spirit they share amongst themselves. And thus with this feeling of closeness people will not be as shy, as if they were strangers, to say "please" or "thank you" and the may understand each other better.
Next, a person's upbringing may also impact greatly on how they interact with other people. Regardless of economic downturn, or the quickening of life pace, if a person is not properly taught of basic courtesies and its importance since young, they may not be able to use such words to show gratitude to the people around them instead they may use other ways to thank others or they may not know how to ask a person nicely to do something, and end up commanding them. And yet the other party does not get feel that she or he has been mistreated as the person is asking of a favour without courtesy or that their help for that person had been ignored without understanding that the other party, the one without proper upbringing, had used other ways to thank that person. Thus family upbringing and teachers will have to play a huge role in cultivating a person, to ensure that that individuals will always be courteous no matter what happens, so as to ensure that people of the future generation will be able to interact and understand each other well enough such that everybody will feel respected.
I think this is the modern generation expression of "yes, I am wrong, I should'nt have done what I did, but (even so you should'nt have done this or said this)/(I did'nt mean it this way or I did'nt want it to happen in this way)...". I feel that this individual is just trying to convey the fact that even though she or he does feel apologetic about what he or she has done, she feels that despite this, her mistakes does not negate the other party's mistake or she/he might have wanted to justify the reasons why she had done the things she had done, to avoid misunderstandingsa about the rationale of her actions.


“Please” and “Thank you.” Today’s economic downturn has spawned more cutthroat behavior with less time for courtesies.

Truth be told, with the same speed at which technology has swept the world, manners have been swept under the proverbial rug. I’m left wondering, is this rudeness the result of today’s angst or a trend of indifference that has evolved over time?

While it doesn’t take much effort to say “please” and “thank you,” some people forgo these pleasantries because they simply don’t know better, while others apparently feel these words are beneath their “pay grade.” How much effort does it take to show some gratitude for a job well done? (It’s not as if you’re being asked to solve world hunger.) The truth is, if you’re too busy to say “please” and “thank you,” don’t be surprised if others are too busy to help you in the future.

I think this does not necessarily apply everywhere and I feel that other than just looking at the surface of these issues, we should look into it and understand why it actually happens.

Firstly, I feel that it depends on the environment and the upbringing of the people. In working environments, where no common spirit are cultivated or not having a feeling of closeness with one colleagues may make certain people feel shy or not be able to relate to the people around them

For example, if a healthy and a close-knitted working environment is cultivated, where everyone is friendly and close to each other, they will offer help in times of trouble or when one is busy due to the common spirit there share amongst themselves. And thus with this feeling of closeness people will not be as shy, as if they were strangers, to say "please" or "thank you."

Moreover, a person's upbringing may impact greatly on how they interact with people. Regardless of economic downturn, or the quickening of life pace, if a person is not properly taught of basic courtesies and its importance since young, they may not be able to use such words to show gratitude to the people around them instead they may use other ways to thank others or they may not know how to ask a person nicely to do something, and end up commanding them. And yet the other party does not get feel that she or he has been mistreated as the person is asking of a favour without courtesy or that their help for that person had been ignored without understanding that the other party, the one without proper upbringing, had used other ways to thank that person. Thus family upbringing and teachers will have to play a huge role in cultivating a person, to ensure that that individuals will always be courteous no matter what happens, so as to ensure that people of the future generation will feel respected and not get
hurt.
Scooped by Bobby Dillard
Scoop.it!

5 Ways to Deliver a Powerful Presentation - People Development Network

5 Ways to Deliver a Powerful Presentation - People Development Network | Growing To Be A Better Communicator | Scoop.it
The ability to deliver a powerful presentation is a critical skill that all employees need today, not just leaders and managers.
more...
No comment yet.