Growing To Be A Better Communicator
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Growing To Be A Better Communicator
Creative communication skills
Curated by Bobby Dillard
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Are Americans trashing the English language?

"Are American's trashing the English language? The Economists language expert, Lane Greene, knows a thing or two about English. Lane is a fan of words, lots of words, and Lane is an American living in London. He's become accustomed to British English slang. But Lane often hears Britons complain that there are too many American words and expressions creeping into British English, these are called Americanisms. British writer Matthew Engel can't stand Americanisms being used in Britain and even wrote a book about it. But are Americanisms trashing British English?"


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 26, 2017 5:47 PM

This video touches on important cultural and spatial dynamics of the linguistic change impacting the world's current lingua franca...in other words, this is incredibly relevant to human geography. 

 

Tags: languagecultureworldwide, English, diffusion,

 colonialism.

Matt Manish's curator insight, March 8, 12:00 PM
I found this video very enjoyable to watch and I learned a lot more about how British people feel about the American language, especially in their own culture. I knew that American English and British English had some small differences with the spelling of some words and differences in some terms for the same object such as lift and elevator. But I didn't realize how some American phrases or "Americanisms" have crept into the British English language and are causing some English citizens to be upset about it.
In response to this information, I have to side with Lane Greene's opinion towards the end of this video. The fact that "Americanisms" are creeping into the British English language is the sign of a healthy and developing language. It means that one language that is being affected by another language because it has a global reach throughout the world. This is a positive thing that shouldn't be feared because as we can see from history, languages change over time and tend to never stay the same.
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Language structure: You're born with it

Language structure: You're born with it | Growing To Be A Better Communicator | Scoop.it
Humans are unique in their ability to acquire language. But how? A new study shows that we are in fact born with the basic fundamental knowledge of language, thus shedding light on the age-old linguistic 'nature vs. nurture' debate.
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Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Coaching Leaders
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The Power and Subtlety of Language in the Workplace

The Power and Subtlety of Language in the Workplace | Growing To Be A Better Communicator | Scoop.it
Markku Allison on how we can improve the flow of understanding in the workplace with the words we use.

Via Dr. Helen Teague, Lynnette Van Dyke, David Hain
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David Hain's curator insight, July 14, 2015 12:20 PM

Very useful.

Dixie Binford's curator insight, July 15, 2015 10:53 AM

Well worth the read ...

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, July 17, 2015 11:34 AM

Interesting insights. What do you think today?