Great Depression
18 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Francisca Kegevic from Chapter 28 The Great Depression letters
Scoop.it!

Great Depression Pictures and images of life

Great Depression Pictures and images of life | Great Depression | Scoop.it
A large compilation of pictures from the Great Depression, including pictures of dust storms, farm foreclosures, migrant workers, women and children, unemployed, and breadlines and soup kitchens.

Via Sarah Littrell
more...
Jessica Tucker's curator insight, November 29, 2016 2:46 PM

Great visuals to help guide students through the book with real situations.

Rescooped by Francisca Kegevic from The Great Depression-Pfitzner
Scoop.it!

Unemployment

Unemployment | Great Depression | Scoop.it

During the Great Depression unemployment rates were the highest they had ever been, and was at its height in 1933 with more than 25% of the US unemployed. There were really two main causes behind this massive unemployment rate. After the Wall Street Crash in October 1929, consumer buying confidence dropped and factories producing consumer goods had no choice but to cut their production.


Via mckeeley tate
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Francisca Kegevic from The Great Depression-Pfitzner
Scoop.it!

The Great Depression - Social impact

The Great Depression - Social impact | Great Depression | Scoop.it

The Great Depression's impact on Australian society was devastating. Without work and a steady income many people lost their homes and were forced to live in rough-and-ready homes with poor heating and sanitation. Other social consequences of the Great Depression included:

Working class children consistently leaving school at 13 or 14 years old
Married women carrying a greater domestic burden: home-making was still considered a woman's role, so even if a woman had worked all day scrubbing floors to bring in some money, her unemployed husband would still expect her to cook dinner and keep the house in order
jobs being easier to find for young people, but the work had little future career prospects and many young workers were sacked by the time they turned sixteen, eighteen or twenty-one years of age
migrants, particularly those from Italy and southern Europe, being resented because they worked for less wages than others despite having relatively little in the way of family or friends to call on for help.


Via mckeeley tate
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Francisca Kegevic from The Great Depression-Pfitzner
Scoop.it!

The Great Depression

The Great Depression | Great Depression | Scoop.it

The Great Depression (1929–32) was a time of extreme hardship for people in
Australia and all around the World.This lated till the second World War in 1939 - 1945.The Wall Street crash in October 1929 started the beginning of a severe depression for the whole world and is now known as the Great Depression.After the crash unemployment in Australia more than doubled to twenty-one per cent
 and reached its peak in mid-1932 when almost thirty-two per cent of Australians were out of work.


Via mckeeley tate
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Francisca Kegevic from Chapter 28 The Great Depression letters
Scoop.it!

Life During the Great Depression

Life During the Great Depression - Read first-hand accounts and stories from people who experienced the hard times and crash of the Depression. Learn what life was like.

Via Sarah Littrell
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Francisca Kegevic from The Great Depression-Pfitzner
Scoop.it!

Why can you give my dad a job

Why can you give my dad a job | Great Depression | Scoop.it

Via mckeeley tate
more...
Kate Pill's comment, March 19, 2012 8:17 AM
Mckeeley, have a look at what you have written as a title and what has actually been written on the poster! Do they match? Also, well done omn choosing a powerful image. What analysis can you make from this image? Hint: Look at all the children! How hard might it have been for them? Why would this image have been powerful? Does this image support another source in your scoop.it?
Rescooped by Francisca Kegevic from The Great Depression-Pfitzner
Scoop.it!

Children and the Great Depression

Children and the Great Depression | Great Depression | Scoop.it

Children had to work because of the Depression. The kids ran away from home and set their lives on the railroads. They were called The Box Car Kids. What they did is they hopped on trains and they would jump on trains while they were moving. If they were moving and you slipped it was to bad. And the girls on the trains mostly dressed as boys. If they didn’t go on disguised they got a bed and meals while on the trains.


Via mckeeley tate
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Francisca Kegevic from The Great Depression-Pfitzner
Scoop.it!

Women in the Great Depression

Women in the Great Depression | Great Depression | Scoop.it

The majority of women found themselves
struggling to get by with minimal money.The typical American woman had a husband that was still employed even if not working full time and taking a pay cut.Many women had to draw the line between making do and doing without.

 


Via mckeeley tate
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Francisca Kegevic from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

European Men Grew Unprecedented 4.3 Inches in The Last Century

European Men Grew Unprecedented 4.3 Inches in The Last Century | Great Depression | Scoop.it
According to a study by Prof Timothy Hatton, the average height of European men grew by an unprecedented 4.3 inches from the mid-19th century to 1980.

 

Prof. Hatton examined and analyzed a new dataset for the average height at the age of around 21 of adult male birth cohorts, from the 1870s to 1980, in 15 European countries. The data were drawn from a variety of sources. For the most recent decades the data were mainly taken from height-by-age in cross sectional surveys.

 

Meanwhile, observations for the earlier years were based on data for the heights of military conscripts and recruits. The data is for men only as the historical evidence for women’s heights is severely limited.

 

“Increases in human stature are a key indicator of improvements in the average health of populations. The evidence suggests that the improving disease environment, as reflected in the fall in infant mortality, is the single most important factor driving the increase in height. The link between infant mortality and height has already been demonstrated by a number of studies,” Prof. Hatton explained.

 

In northern and middle European countries including Britain and Ireland, the Scandinavian countries, Netherlands, Austria, Belgium, and Germany there was a ‘distinct quickening’ in the pace of advance in the period spanning the two World Wars and the Great Depression.

 

This is striking because the period largely predates the wide implementation of major breakthroughs in modern medicine and national health services. One possible reason, alongside the crucial decline in infant mortality, for the rapid growth of average male height in this period was that there was a strong downward trend in fertility at the time, and smaller family sizes have already been linked with increasing height.

 

Other factors in the increase in average male height include an increased income per capita; more sanitary housing and living conditions; better general education about health and nutrition (which led to better care for children and young people within the home); and better social services and health systems.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Zeke Robinson's curator insight, March 23, 2015 10:04 PM

It talks about how we are developing with health and disease rates and mortality rates as times goes on because we are becoming healthier and adapting more to things like this.