Graphic Design Psychology
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The Psychology Of Color In Logo Design

The Psychology Of Color In Logo Design | Graphic Design Psychology | Scoop.it
A cool infographic that lays out the emotions we feel when presented with certain colors and the qualities this brings to logo designs. Color psychology.
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Emily Garrison's comment, February 17, 2014 10:21 AM
Scientists have studied the way that different colors can affect us for years. As long as a designer has a lot of knowledge about these different colors and theories they have and advantage. They are very simple and fast rules that a designer can use for their clients advantage.
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Colour Assignment - Preferences

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Emily Garrison's comment, February 18, 2014 10:07 AM
Color preference varies by the age that a company is marketing too. Where as blue and red maintain a high preference throughout life, colors seem to drop down the list while other colors become more preferred. The color yellow is well liked by kids, but starts to drop down on the list for adults. "With maturity comes a greater liking for hues of shorter wave length (blue, green, purple) than for hues of longer wave length(red, orange and yellow" Birren states.
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How do colors affect purchases? Infographic

How do colors affect purchases? Infographic | Graphic Design Psychology | Scoop.it
For retailers, shopping is the art of persuasion. Though there are many factors that influence how and what consumers buy.
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What Colours Say About Your Brand | Infographic

What Colours Say About Your Brand | Infographic | Graphic Design Psychology | Scoop.it
Tweet Tweet Colours play a big role in the way a brand gives off its image, designers will know this already. But many people don’t seem to understand how important colours are. If you’re a luxury brand selling luxury products you’re not going to use pink in your website and logo, pink can make it […
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Social Change Via Graphic Design

Social Change Via Graphic Design | Graphic Design Psychology | Scoop.it
Combating social stereotypes with small changes to a familiar icon
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Emily Garrison's comment, February 13, 2014 10:27 AM
Little tweaks can make a huge difference. This is the principle stating that a small change to something such as public policy or organizational procedure is created to push people to change their behavior.
Emily Garrison's comment, February 13, 2014 10:30 AM
An example of this would be in hotel rooms with a sign asking to think of the environment by reusing towels and hanging them up. These sign are effective in more than one way. FInding out that the previous inhabitants and everyone before them staying in your very rom have reused their towels which leads to much higher rates of compliance.
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The Gestalt Principles

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Emily Garrison's comment, February 17, 2014 10:28 AM
The psychological term Gestalt means 'unified whole'. This term refers to the theories developed by German psychologists in the 1920's about visual perception. These theories show how people tend to organized the visual elements into groups or unified wholes.
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The Psychology of Color in Marketing and Branding | Help Scout

The Psychology of Color in Marketing and Branding | Help Scout | Graphic Design Psychology | Scoop.it
The psychology of color as it relates to persuasion is one of the most interesting—and most controversial—aspects of marketing.
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Emily Garrison's comment, February 17, 2014 10:14 AM
There is little factual data to show behind the actual psychology, although there is a lot of conversation. There are many different factors that make color choice more of a personal preference; experiences, upbringing, cultural differences, context etc. These factors often alter the effect that an individual color has on us. So saying that the idea of yellow or purple are going to have an effect on a person is only a possibility.
Emily Garrison's comment, February 17, 2014 10:24 AM
Studies have shown that the relationship between brands and color hinges on the perceived appropriateness of the color being used for the particular brand. In other words is the color 'fits' what is being sold.
Tami Yaklich's comment, March 4, 2014 8:09 AM
Make sure you are PARAPHRASING - putting info into your own words. You've taken a lot of word for word info here
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The psychology of design explained - Features

The psychology of design explained - Features | Graphic Design Psychology | Scoop.it
Anna Richardson Taylor explores the importance of an understanding of psychology when it comes to design
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Emily Garrison's comment, February 14, 2014 10:18 AM
In the 1920's German psychologists developed the gestalt theories. These theories explain how people will organize visual elements into groups and how the whole is often greater than its parts. The theory explains of how the brain will self organize in a more orderly, regular, symmetrical and simple manner. The Gestalt principals used in a logo will make it more interesting, therefore making it more memorable
Emily Garrison's comment, February 14, 2014 10:22 AM
“It does happen that someone takes psychological theory and applies it to creativity in some way, but it’s more likely that someone creative intuits what’s a truthful way of perceiving and sensing things. And that’s then reflected in their work and gets picked up by psychologists.” - Ed Woodcock
Emily Garrison's comment, February 14, 2014 10:26 AM
Social proof also proves as a bias. It show that people tend to do something if they know that others are doing it too. Amazon has put this to work by filling up their websites with items of social proof such as reviews and recommendations.
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Colour Psychology in Logo Design | Infographic

Colour Psychology in Logo Design | Infographic | Graphic Design Psychology | Scoop.it
Tweet Tweet Most of the recognisable logos we see everyday aren’t the colour they are because the designers liked it. Colours are chosen very carefully to have a psychological effect on a person when they see it. Companies like Facebook will go through hundreds of shades of blue just to get the colour that has […
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Emily Garrison's comment, February 14, 2014 10:29 AM
Popular logos don't tend to be the color they are because the designer liked it, colors are chosen very carefully depending on what the company wants to convey through it.