Graphene • Next Material Generation
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Graphene • Next Material Generation
New technology. Pure carbon. EU grant 1Billion€ for his development. These include lightweight, thin, flexible, yet durable display screens, electric circuits, and solar cells, as well as various medical, chemical and industrial processes enhanced or enabled by the use of new graphene materials.
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Graphene: Made in Manchester

Graphene is the world's thinnest material. The two dimensional material was first isolated by Professor Andre Gein and Professor Kostya Novoselov at The Univ...

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'Dancing' Silicon Atoms Discovered in Graphene - Science Daily (press release)

'Dancing' Silicon Atoms Discovered in Graphene - Science Daily (press release) | Graphene • Next Material Generation | Scoop.it
'Dancing' Silicon Atoms Discovered in Graphene Science Daily (press release) "Capturing atomic clusters inside patterned graphene nanopores could potentially lead to practical applications in areas such as electronic and optoelectronic devices, as...

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ORNL microscopy uncovers "dancing" silicon atoms in graphene - Space Daily

ORNL microscopy uncovers "dancing" silicon atoms in graphene - Space Daily | Graphene • Next Material Generation | Scoop.it
ORNL microscopy uncovers "dancing" silicon atoms in graphene Space Daily The ORNL research team documented the atoms' unique behavior by first trapping groups of silicon atoms, known as clusters, in a single-atom-thick sheet of carbon called...

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ORNL microscopy uncovers "dancing" silicon atoms in graphene - Space Daily

ORNL microscopy uncovers "dancing" silicon atoms in graphene - Space Daily | Graphene • Next Material Generation | Scoop.it
ORNL microscopy uncovers "dancing" silicon atoms in graphene Space Daily The ORNL research team documented the atoms' unique behavior by first trapping groups of silicon atoms, known as clusters, in a single-atom-thick sheet of carbon called...

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New water desalination technology shows promise | Human World ...

New water desalination technology shows promise | Human World ... | Graphene • Next Material Generation | Scoop.it
Scientists from MIT have designed a next-generation water desalination membrane that could greatly improve our ability to extract drinkable water from the sea.

Via Jonathan Clarke
Louismagie Picard's insight:

Water desalination.

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4 Ways Graphene Changes Everything

4 Ways Graphene Changes Everything | Graphene • Next Material Generation | Scoop.it

4 Ways Graphene Changes Everything: solar energy, information technology, battery power, and water treatment.


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Properties of Two-Dimensional Silicon grown on Graphene Substrate

Properties of Two-Dimensional Silicon grown on Graphene Substrate | Graphene • Next Material Generation | Scoop.it
READE Advanced Materials. Chemicals. Manufacturer, custom processor, and global distributor of value added specialty chemical solids. Sales offices in RI, NV and Republic of Panama.

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How technology is slowly developing its sense of smell

How technology is slowly developing its sense of smell | Graphene • Next Material Generation | Scoop.it
It’s easy to be sniffy about the concept of sending odors through the internet, but researchers are nonetheless hard at work on folding the sense of smell into the digital repertoire.
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Berkeley creates the first graphene earphones, and unsurprisingly they have a superb performance

Berkeley creates the first graphene earphones, and unsurprisingly they have a superb performance | Graphene • Next Material Generation | Scoop.it

Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley have created the first ever graphene audio speaker: an earphone. In its raw state, without any kind of optimization, the researchers show that graphene’s superior physical and electrical properties allow for an earphone with frequency response comparable to or better than a pair of commercial Sennheiser earphones.

 

A loudspeaker (or earphone or headphone) works by vibrating a (usually) paper diaphragm (aka a cone), creating pressure waves in the air around you. Depending on the frequency of these waves, different sounds are created. Human ears, depending on their age, can usually hear frequencies between 20Hz (very low pitch) and 20KHz (very high). Generally, the quality of a speaker is defined by how flat its frequency response is — in other words, whether it produces sounds equally well, no matter where they fall on the 20Hz to 20KHz scale. A poor speaker, or, say, a bassy set of headphones, might be very strong in the lower ranges, but weaker at the top.

 

In Berkeley’s graphene earphone, the diaphragm is made from a 30nm-thick, 7mm-wide sheet of graphene. This diaphragm is then sandwiched between two silicon electrodes, which are coated with silicon dioxide to prevent any shorting if the diaphragm is driven too hard. By applying power to the electrodes, an electrostatic force is created, which causes the graphene diaphragm to vibrate, creating sound. By oscillating the electricity, different sounds are created.

 

Given graphene’s status as a wonder material we shouldn’t really be surprised, but it turns out that this graphene speaker — the first of its kind — has intrinsically excellent performance. As you can see in the graph above, the graphene earphone’s frequency response is superb. The reason for this is down to the graphene diaphragm’s simplicity: Whereas most diaphragms/cones must be damped (padded, restricted) to prevent undesirable frequency responses, the graphene diaphragm requires no damping. This is because graphene is so strong that the diaphragm can be incredibly thin — and thus very light. Instead of being artificially damped, the graphene diaphragm is damped by air itself. As a corollary, the lack of damping means that the graphene diaphragm is also very energy efficient — which could be important for reducing the power usage of smartphone and tablet speakers.


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Le graphène: prometteur pour convertir la lumière en électricité

Le graphène: prometteur pour convertir la lumière en électricité | Graphene • Next Material Generation | Scoop.it
Des chercheurs de l'Institut des Sciences Photoniques de Barcelone (ICFO) ont mis en évidence, dans le cadre d'un projet international, que le graphène est un matériau performant...

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