Governance, Risk and Compliance (GRC)
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Governance, Risk and Compliance (GRC)
Unleashing the power and value from the isolated silos of governance, risk and compliance
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About Us

About Us | Governance, Risk and Compliance (GRC) | Scoop.it
We are very proud of our rare and unusual extensive experience covering all three areas of Governance, Risk and Compliance (GRC). We passionately care about your problems and challenges, and work in partnership with and not in isolation from you. We don't impose pre-conceived solutions, and take time to properly understand the context in which you operate. We listen and relish bringing order to challenging situations, full of complexity and ambiguity.

So we enjoy our work and hope you will too... bringing order to organisational change!

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The Continuity Central debate: is GRC business continuity’s future?

In a recent Continuity Central webinar, it was predicted that business continuity management will decline as a separate discipline and will become increasingly seen as an aspect of GRC.


During the webinar ‘BCM: The Road Ahead,’ Coop Systems’ CEO, Chris Alvord, made the point that GRC (Governance, Risk and Compliance) is emerging as the overarching risk discipline and he expects business continuity management to become increasingly aligned with risk management and therefore with GRC. There will be an emphasis on breaking down the silo of business continuity management as a separate distinct discipline and upon getting more cross-discipline expertise.


Chris has raised an important point.


Business continuity management emerged from the technical discipline of IT disaster recovery. With the advent of BS 25999 and that standard's emphasis on business continuity as a management system, many felt that BCM had arrived at its destination and that future developments would probably be ‘tweaks’ to the planning and management process rather than whole-scale rexaminations of the fundamentals of business continuity management. But is that really going to be the case? Is BCM about to be acquired by GRC and, if so, what will the consequences be?


To discuss these questions Continuity Central ran an online debate, inviting business continuity professionals to comment on the points made above. A total of 131 people took part and the reponses are below.

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Integrated GRC: Understanding the Benefits and Beginning the Journey to Obtain Them

Integrated GRC: Understanding the Benefits and Beginning the Journey to Obtain Them | Governance, Risk and Compliance (GRC) | Scoop.it
The earlier part of the decade (the so-called “Enron era”) demonstrated that the pursuit of profit without a commitment to good-faith business principles and responsible business behavior comes at a high cost to shareholders.


The latter part of the decade (the financial crisis) demonstrates that pursuit of profit without consideration of strategic business risks, the impact of incentive compensation on risk taking, and underlying market conditions can have a catastrophic ripple effect across all industries and geographies.


These two eras provide bookends for lessons about the development of points of view around governance, risk and compliance (GRC) and how it has evolved from a compliance-driven effort toward a sharper focus on performance and risk-based decision making. While GRC is becoming a more recognized concept, decision makers are still challenged with specifically defining what it is and communicating its value.

This article defines GRC, provides insights into developing a value proposition specific to your business context, and articulates measured steps toward evolving integrated GRC practices.

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The Future of GRC: Integrating Culture and Technology

In Compliance & Ethics Professional, Luis Rams discusses the future of GRC and how technology and ethical culture come together.


Corporate officers from diverse industries and enterprises, of every size and shape, are looking to integrated GRC as a means to protect their interests, build business value, and reduce the drag from disparate compliance data.


In 2001, Enron went from playing the role of corporate darling to being accused of leading one of the largest cases of corporate malfeasance in the United States.


Unfortunately, the early part of that decade also saw other notorious cases of corporate fraud in which company executives inflated revenues, participated in insider trading, or misused company funds for their own lavish, personal gains.


In these most infamous incidents, the fallout was significant. Companies closed. Employees lost their retirement savings, or in many cases their jobs, and business as we knew it would change in many ways. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX) of 2002 set out to eliminate or at least reduce some elements of corporate fraud by deterring company leadership from engaging in or overlooking unethical behavior within their organizations.

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