Gov & Law Matthew S.
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Rescooped by Matthew Sigrist from Seasons of Pride
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Will the Supreme Court License Anti-Gay Discrimination? - Huffington Post

Will the Supreme Court License Anti-Gay Discrimination? - Huffington Post | Gov & Law Matthew S. | Scoop.it
“ Washington Post Will the Supreme Court License Anti-Gay Discrimination?”
Via Kelly Riker
Matthew Sigrist's insight:
The fact that this ruling could allow businesses to hold religious beliefs like individuals, as well as discriminate based on those beliefs, is startling and is hopefully decided using common sense and logic, without bias.
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Rescooped by Matthew Sigrist from Politics and Business
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Supreme Court Defends Wealthy's Right to Own Government

Supreme Court Defends Wealthy's Right to Own Government | Gov & Law Matthew S. | Scoop.it
“ The Supreme Court today defended the right of the wealthiest Americans to own the United States government.”
Via Dave Cottrell
Matthew Sigrist's insight:
This article is surprising in its very evident bias, and the quotes used in this article are almost certainly quote-mined, if not falsified outright, judging by the frankness and inappropriateness of them.
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Minimum Wage Debate: Disproportionately Impacts Individuals with Developmental Disabilities | PRLog

Minimum Wage Debate: Disproportionately Impacts Individuals with Developmental Disabilities | PRLog | Gov & Law Matthew S. | Scoop.it
“ Minimum Wage Debate: Disproportionately Impacts Individuals with Developmental Disabilities. The Arc Maryland Says: It's time to address sub-minimum wage! - PR12278468”
Matthew Sigrist's insight:
The difference in impact between people of varying disabilities is surprising, but it makes so much sense once you think about it. It is hidden factors like this that people need to keep in mind while passing minimum wage legislation.
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Rescooped by Matthew Sigrist from Healthcare Documentation
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Records for Life - Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Records for Life - Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation | Gov & Law Matthew S. | Scoop.it
“ Immunization cards just got cool. See how we reinvented child health records. http://t.co/Hl5gTXdJD0 #vaccineswork”
Via Linda G. Brady, CAE
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Rescooped by Matthew Sigrist from Occupied Palestine
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US foreign policy still biased in favor of Israel

US foreign policy still biased in favor of Israel | Gov & Law Matthew S. | Scoop.it
“ [ PIC 03/02/2013 - 11:03 PM ] GAZA, (PIC)-- Dr. Sami Abu Zuhri, a Hamas spokesman, has said that there was no hope of a real and essential change in the US foreign policy in the second term in offi...”
Via occupiedpalestine
Matthew Sigrist's insight:
The United States is still heavily supporting Israel and it's borderline illegal subjugation of Palestinians and war against the PLO.
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Rescooped by Matthew Sigrist from NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development
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US foreign policy and Ugandan domestic politics collide - Washington Post (blog)

US foreign policy and Ugandan domestic politics collide - Washington Post (blog) | Gov & Law Matthew S. | Scoop.it
“ Washington Post (blog) US foreign policy and Ugandan domestic politics collide Washington Post (blog) It is entirely possible that, rather than an overarching government strategy to target organizations who serve LGBTI clients, a particular branch...”
Via Nevermore Sithole
Matthew Sigrist's insight:
US foreign policy clashes greatly with the recent Ugandan legislation on perceived homosexuals within the country, and the Ugandan security forces have breached US military institutions as a result of the laws.
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Rescooped by Matthew Sigrist from Internet Public Policy Issues
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Facebook terms and conditions: why you don't own your online life - Telegraph

Facebook terms and conditions: why you don't own your online life - Telegraph | Gov & Law Matthew S. | Scoop.it
“ Did you read the terms when you joined Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn? Oliver Smith explains how social networks effectively own your online content.”
Via Paul Conneally
Matthew Sigrist's insight:
It is odd how a site like Facebook would take advantage of public oversight of privacy rights to allow control over information like this, but it's even worse knowing that they allow the NSA to view that same information.
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Rescooped by Matthew Sigrist from Chapter 5 Bill of Rights Mini-Project DiSalvo
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8th Amendment protects man from death penalty

8th Amendment protects man from death penalty | Gov & Law Matthew S. | Scoop.it

Romell Broom's death penalty sentence was overturned when executioners failed to find appropiate use for the death penalty. This would be considered "cruel and unusual punishment," violating Broom's 8th Amendment rights. 


Via Krista DiSalvo
Matthew Sigrist's insight:

This article brings up a very good point, one that could, in the future, even be used to get rid of the death penalty entirely. By deeming Broom's execution a violation of his rights under the eighth amendment, he was allowed to live. 

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Brian Bertram's curator insight, April 30, 2014 12:00 PM

This article is about the death penalty. The man claimed that it was a violation of his 8th amendment rights to have an execution twice.  in this case though, they never actually administered the drugs required to kill him. I think that the execution should happen again in this case.  I agree with the courts ruling of it was not a violation.   

Rescooped by Matthew Sigrist from Digital Cinema
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The Digital Self: Can the 4th Amendment fit in 140 characters? - Digital Trends

The Digital Self: Can the 4th Amendment fit in 140 characters? - Digital Trends | Gov & Law Matthew S. | Scoop.it
The Digital Self: Can the 4th Amendment fit in 140 characters?

Via BBFMP
Matthew Sigrist's insight:

I think it is very interesting how the fourth amendment is being stretched and skewed to benefit the government and the PRISM program, but also how the public sector is doing the same thing  to protect their rights. This is all over the value inherent in the public statements and private emails of the US's citizens, and even the citizens of other countries. 

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Alyssa Serrano's curator insight, March 4, 2014 10:54 PM

This article is saying that once something is put online, the government can use it against you in court  even if they do not have a search warrant. You put it online so that is public information. I agree with this, if strangers follow you they can see all of your info that you put online  so what should be different about the police? If you do not want officials seeing things that could get you in trouble you should not put it online

Rescooped by Matthew Sigrist from Coffee Party Election Coverage
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How’s This Federalism Thing Work Again?

How’s This Federalism Thing Work Again? | Gov & Law Matthew S. | Scoop.it

by NOAH MILLMAN


Same-sex marriage and marijuana legalization won a series of referenda on Tuesday, and good partisans of Federalism should, presumably, cheer. Where does the Constitution say that the Federal Government should have any opinion about personal status law? Where does the Constitution say that the Federal Government should have any opinion about control of mind-altering substances?


Except . . . it’s very hard for me to see how the Federal Government can avoid getting involved.


Federal law contains a variety of preferences for people in a state of matrimony. Refusing to recognize a duly solemnized and legal marriage in Maine or Washington is plainly to have an opinion about personal status – and one that conflicts with the states in question. Recognizing such marriages means giving them national legitimacy – again, that’s the Federal Government offering an opinion.


Advocates for marijuana legalization are fretting now about the DEA disregarding the opinion of the voters in Colorado and Washington – with good reason given the behavior of the Obama DEA in response to much more limited medical marijuana laws in states like California. But the alternative would be something akin to national decriminalization. There’s no customs post in Nebraska to inspect the luggage of visitors to Colorado, after all.


I happen to support national recognition of same-sex marriages, because I think the states should be allowed to innovate in this manner, and the Federal Government should not register a contrary opinion. (For that matter, I also favored the same-sex marriage law in my state, New York.) But I’m not deluded that this formal neutrality isn’t a substantive endorsement. I also happen to support marijuana decriminalization. But, again, I’m not deluded into thinking that legalization in one state won’t make it difficult to impossible to enforce prohibition in a neighboring state. In such a way, a handful of states, if their sovereignty is taken seriously, can change national policy.


Tricky thing, this Federal system of ours.


Via Michael Charney
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Ann Marie Rydberg's curator insight, February 19, 2014 2:14 PM

This article is interesting and related to federalism because it discusses a couple the current day issues that involve federalism.  The issues of same-sex marriage and the legalization of marijuana are problems of state vs national government because if the federal government endorses laws made by the states then they are giving them national legitimacy which infringes on the laws made by other states.  However, if the federal government doesn't recognize these laws then they violate the states' rights.  While Federalism is a great form of government that prevents any one level from acquiring too much power, it can also create problems as to which level of government should deal with making new laws. 

Benton Blank's comment, February 22, 2014 9:15 PM
I think that this article makes a good point, federalism is a great way to prevent a single group from having too much power, but where do you draw the line between these jurisdictions. Isn't part of the idea to allow the states the freedom to "pilot" laws, and if they work well to be adopted by the rest? In such a case as the decriminalization of marijuana, that is exactly what Colorado and Washington are doing. With that being said, I see the reason that the national government would have issues with this, as allowing marijuana in one state will inevitably cause an increase in the surrounding states, which would become problematic. I think this seems to be an issue that would have to be agreed upon and implemented simultaneously to avoid issues between states.
Haley Abrams's comment, February 23, 2014 12:09 AM
I think that this article does a great job of showing two very real examples of what is happening and how it relates to federalism. This is a very thin line with national and state powers for example if marijuana was legalized I one state it would be harder to control in the surrounding states. So the legalization does not just affect that one state it affects the slurring states as well which makes it a bigger concern to the Federal Government. But how can the Federal Government interact without over stepping its boundaries? This is a very difficult problem that should be solved at a larger scale no just within the states but with its neighbors also.
Rescooped by Matthew Sigrist from News You Can Use - NO PINKSLIME
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Farmers' lawsuit against Monsanto headed to U.S. Supreme Court, Federal Gov. BRIBERY by monsanto, Maker of Agent Orange

Farmers' lawsuit against Monsanto headed to U.S. Supreme Court, Federal Gov. BRIBERY by monsanto, Maker of Agent Orange | Gov & Law Matthew S. | Scoop.it
“ Farmers' lawsuit against Monsanto headed to U.S. Supreme Court”
Via #BBBundyBlog #NOMORELIES Tom Woods #Activist Award #Scoopiteer >20,000 Sources >250K Connections http://goo.gl/ruHO3Q
Matthew Sigrist's insight:
This is very striking to me, especially considering the amount of pull Monsanto has historically had with our government, such as the agent orange from the title, which brought controversy due to its use in the Vietnam War.
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Rescooped by Matthew Sigrist from Economics issues
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Why even minimum wage haters should be excited for Seattle’s $15 minimum wage

Why even minimum wage haters should be excited for Seattle’s $15 minimum wage | Gov & Law Matthew S. | Scoop.it
“ We can learn a lot from a high minimum wage.”
Via jon inge
Matthew Sigrist's insight:
While the difference in cost of living in Seattle relative to the rest of the country is very large, this is still a significant increase in minimum wage and will still create a large affect on the local economy.
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Rescooped by Matthew Sigrist from Restaurant Marketing News, Ideas & Articles
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Hidden costs of minimum wage increases

Hidden costs of minimum wage increases | Gov & Law Matthew S. | Scoop.it
Exempt employee salary increases, compliance costs, seniority costs, payroll taxes and competition costs are among the expected impacts of a minimum wage increase.
Via Craig Aberle
Matthew Sigrist's insight:
It's interesting that many people who support or don't support minimum wage don't appreciate the hidden costa and lurking variables behind implementing it, and this reflects on the American propensity as a culture toward bite-sized arguments and opinions.
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Rescooped by Matthew Sigrist from Social Media and Healthcare
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How Social Media is Being Used by Healthcare Professionals

How Social Media is Being Used by Healthcare Professionals | Gov & Law Matthew S. | Scoop.it
Over the last five years, the adoption of social media in America has soared. According to eMarketer, by 2016 over 2 billion people are expected to be on at least one social media platform. Social media has been adopted by and benefited almost every major industry in America, and this holds especially true for healthcare. Both patients and doctors alike are seeing the benefits social media brings to the health industry, especially through: - Greater doctor, patient interaction - Keeping doctors up-to-date on the latest trends - Helping to inform patients on illnesses - Providing more insights into major diseasesThe infographic below shows the amazing benefits that social media has brought to the healthcare industry over the last five years, and how healthcare has been altered, perhaps forever, by its implementation.- See more at: http://www.careerglider.com/blog/social-media-impacting-healthcare-careers/#sthash.KZrUDVBZ.dpuf
Via Plus91
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Rescooped by Matthew Sigrist from Social Finance Matters (investing and business models for good)
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Many Eyes : Distribution of US Foreign Aid over time, 1946-2005

Many Eyes : Distribution of US Foreign Aid over time, 1946-2005 | Gov & Law Matthew S. | Scoop.it
Visualization of the Distribution of US Foreign Aid over time, 1946-2005.
Via W. Robert de Jongh
Matthew Sigrist's insight:
It's interesting how the United States has shifted the focus of its foreign aid over the years.
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Rescooped by Matthew Sigrist from Intellectual Property news, views and opinions
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US Lays Out Process For Public Input To Copyright Policy Reform | Intellectual Property Watch

US Lays Out Process For Public Input To Copyright Policy Reform | Intellectual Property Watch | Gov & Law Matthew S. | Scoop.it
“ The United States Patent and Trademark Office has helped to outline the process for public comments and participation in the ongoing reform to the US copyright system.”
Via Inngot
Matthew Sigrist's insight:
I think it's important to crowd source the making of policies like this to the public that it affects.
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Rescooped by Matthew Sigrist from Internet Public Policy Issues
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US pledges to loosen grip on net. Don't be fooled (Wired UK)

US pledges to loosen grip on net. Don't be fooled (Wired UK) | Gov & Law Matthew S. | Scoop.it
The US is trying to appease international unease about its stranglehold over the net by relinquishing -- at least nominally -- some responsibility. But don't be fooled, argues Julia Powles
Via Paul Conneally
Matthew Sigrist's insight:
I think it is very terrible and unfair that the United States government holds such a disproportionate control over something that belongs to everyone, and actually consists of other people's private property, and that they actually lease this out to a private company.
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Rescooped by Matthew Sigrist from Global Politics - Human Rights
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China censures America on human rights - Boston Globe

China censures America on human rights - Boston Globe | Gov & Law Matthew S. | Scoop.it
China Daily China censures America on human rights Boston Globe BEIJING — China slammed the human rights record of the United States in response to Washington's report on rights around the world, saying that US military operations have infringed on...

Via earthdog58
Matthew Sigrist's insight:

I think this is very interesting due to the heat between the United States and the PRC. This game of ping pong, featuring accusations of human rights abuses as a ball, only serves to show just how obsessed with the protection of,  as well as the stifling of, human rights these two countries are.

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Paul girard's comment, April 23, 2013 5:31 AM
"american citizens do not genuinely enjoy the right to vote" -im just THAT close to hit my head on the wall a few times.
earthdog58's curator insight, April 23, 2013 12:25 PM

Pot, this is Kettle; Kettle, this is Pot

 

earthdog58's comment, March 6, 2014 9:40 PM
It is the almost childish use of name-calling, rude remarks followed by rude remarks back, that make one doubt the sincerity of both sides. The assumed, and oh so hypercritical, moral high-ground taken by the US would be laughable if it were not a sign of something profoundly wrong with the ways in which world leaders see, and treat, the world.
Rescooped by Matthew Sigrist from AP Government & Politics
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Federalism and the authority of the states to define marriage : SCOTUSblog


Via Teresa Herrin
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khedlu17's curator insight, April 16, 2014 6:14 PM

This article talks about the principles of federalism, and honoring the exclusive authority of the states to define and to defend marriage. Why this relates to government and law is that it talks about the states rights to decide their own laws. The article talks about two court cases the United States v. Windsor and Hollingsworth v. Perry where Congress interfered with state sovereign choices about who may be married by creating its own definition, relegating one set of marriages- same-sex marriages- to the second tier, making them unequal. 

Joe Smith's curator insight, April 16, 2014 6:24 PM

There is a controversy  between the definition of marriage . The state government wants to be able to make their own definition of marriage  so gay marriage can be legal but the federal government has their own definition for it.

naknuts37's curator insight, April 19, 2014 10:31 PM

In response to khedlu17:

This article discusses federalism and the rights the states have to define marriage however they want. A Justice Kennedy believes that the Defense of Marriage Act "harms same-sex marriage. According to the author, leaving this issue to the states preserves an element of freedom. How will the views of those who uphold traditional marriage be seen if same-sex marriage were to become legal in a majority of the states? And vice versa? 

Rescooped by Matthew Sigrist from AP Government & Politics
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In U.S., Trust in State, Local Governments Up

In U.S., Trust in State, Local Governments Up | Gov & Law Matthew S. | Scoop.it

FEDERALISM RELATED TOPIC

Sixty-five percent of Americans trust their state government to handle state problems and 74% trust their local government to handle local problems. Both figures are up from last year, and are at or near the highs for the last decade.


Via Teresa Herrin
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Wyatt Nelson's curator insight, February 11, 2014 10:46 PM

It makes sense that more people trust the state government more than the local government because the state government makes bigger laws and can over rule the local government. 

Ian (ACL) Whitney's comment, February 16, 2014 12:02 PM
It makes sense, I trust the state government more than the lacal government. Mainly because I don't keep up with the local government as much so I never know what's going on.
Brian Bertram's curator insight, April 16, 2014 11:22 PM

This article is about trust in the government.  It said that trust is on the rise for our local and state government.  This is good since it means that people are happy with how things are going.  They should be trusting in the government since they are the ones that elected the officials to run it.