Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
An Educator's Reading List of Contemporary Literature, Literacy, and Reading Issues. Visit us at https://www.GoogleLitTrips.org
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Transcript: President Obama on What Books Mean to Him

Transcript: President Obama on What Books Mean to Him | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Michiko Kakutani, our chief book critic, met with Mr. Obama to discuss the books and writers that have influenced his life and presidency.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
16 January 2017

For many years the Google Lit Trips project has used the tagline, "BECAUSE LITERARY READING BRINGS WISDOM TO THE INFORMATION AGE."

In this scooped article President Obama, shares his appreciation for what Literary Reading has meant to him. It is thoughtful, contemplative, and displays the depth of wisdom to which he has been indebted throughout his life. And a depth of thoughtfulness contemplation, and wisdom that may be becoming dangerously absent as President Obama transitions the power of the presidency to his successor.

We are now entering what has been labeled the Post Truth Era. One need not look far to find the "liberties" that are being taken with too many, even at the highest levels, are disregarding the value of truth. 

In recent years, literary reading has had to constantly defend its value in too many curricula. Now, we find ourselves in times where Informational Reading has edged into an area where truth and information may be becoming irrelevant in the minds of far too many adults. 

Many of us who have cherished information and wisdom are wondering what we can do given the apparent pending trajectories at the highest levels of government. 

One thing we can do, and must do is ratchet up our efforts to bring facts, information and wisdom back into the prominence they deserve. 

It's time we Double Down.

 ~ GoogleLitTrips.org ~
Brought to you by GLT Global ED | Google Lit Trips an educational nonprofit


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Fiction v nonfiction – English literature's made-up divide

Fiction v nonfiction – English literature's made-up divide | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Some cultures do not distinguish between fiction and nonfiction – and instead talk of ‘stories’. Is that a barrier to English-language writers and publishers? Or should they just learn to enjoy telling tales?
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
31 March 2016

I found this article fascinating in that I had no idea that in multiple cultures there is no distinction between fiction and nonfiction. 

A confession. Though somewhat useful when meandering around the library or bookstore without a  particular title in mind, just because I felt like picking up a book or two to read, I've had doubts about the importance of tagging books by their genre or categorization labels. 

It started with a teacher who criticized me because I confessed on the first day of class that I was an Ian Fleming fan have read more than one, but not many more than one James Bond book. Fleming was essentially the first author of whom I had read multiple novels. It was subconscious at best, but becoming an author fan took me to another level of literary appreciation. It was no longer merely a good plot that determined my interest. I realized that authors have distinctive styles and themes. Fleming took me to a new level of appreciate for reading. That teacher pushed that new level into the closet by telling me that Flemings was trash.

Ironically, though I secretly kept reading Flemings, I carried a bit of shame in the possibility of being caught reading trash. And, because of that it was many years before I even gave science fiction a chance, given that it too was often deemed unworthy of being called literature. 

But, about the distinction between fiction and nonfiction. I have learned quite a lot of facts from nonfiction and quite a lot of TRUTHS from fiction. But, I've always been just a bit leery about the gap between a books full of facts and the interpretations of those facts being suggested by their authors. I am not a conspiracist who assumes that nonfiction is probably unreliable. But, when I was a kid, my history book told me that George Custer was an American hero. When I was a young teacher visiting friends in Virginia I was shown their daughter's Virginia History book  that claimed there was no Civil War (it was a disturbance between the states) and that the South had won it because it was the south that had the courage to first cease hostilities.

Is it a fair question to wonder whether there isn't some degree of bias cherry picking in all history books? Or, can we really say that nonfiction by definition should be accepted as telling 
"the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth"?

(odd transition) When I taught journalism, there were rules. Opinion went on the editorial page. News went on the news pages. Both were considered nonfiction. The distinction being that Editorials allowed for cherry picking facts and a certain level of questionable yet often loud self-righteousness.

Those rules seem to have relaxed a bit "if you really want to know the truth" as Donald Trump might suggest when he refers to "Obamacare" as a "complete disaster."

Yet, flipping the coin raises the question of what are sometimes referred to as the "eternal truths" expressed in fiction. Voltaire, Twain, Orwell, Vonnegut and so many others put the costume of fiction on their articulations of "the way it is."

brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips an educational nonprofit
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Want More Dates? Survey Says You Should Read More Books

Want More Dates? Survey Says You Should Read More Books | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
#Truth.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
21 June 2016

Yep! And there's even an App for that!

What are you doing for your first day's lesson in your literature class?

I might well be starting with this INFORMATIONAL READING article. 

My favorite line? 

"The findings aren’t all that surprising, considering a 2014 Pew Research study that showed millennials — the generation most likely to be using dating apps — are actually more likely to have read a book in the past year than folks from other generations. While the narrative may be that books need saving, it would seem that the pastime is alive as ever."


brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit
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