Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
An Educator's Reading List of Contemporary Literature, Literacy, and Reading Issues. Visit us at https://www.GoogleLitTrips.org
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There’s A Flipside To Every Story. This Tool Shows You How.

There’s A Flipside To Every Story. This Tool Shows You How. | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
This app collects the headlines from top news outlets from an array of political leanings.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
5 April 2017 
 
 Regardless of what we believe, can there be any doubt that we are living in times when developing deeper Informational reading skill sets is essential for our students as well as for ourselves? 

 For many years I had a banner above my black, then green, then white board with one of my favorite quotes from photographer Aaron Siskind. It said, "We look at the world and see what we have learned to believe is there." 

This incredible new resource is making a strong effort to assist us in refining our understanding of how to evaluate the actual truth or lack of truth as well as the degree of political bias in what it is that we have learned to believe is there. 

The vertical scale measure the degree of trustworthiness in various articles. The horizontal scale measures the political leaning of those articles. The chart is updated every two hours!

BASIC DIRECTIONS:
First select a topic from the list on the left. 

Double click anywhere on the chart to zoom in. Then  tapping a bubble for any publisher reveals relevant headlines on the right side of the screen.

Then tapping any of the revealed headlines take you directly to that article.

Thoughts on how I might integrate this tool...
• Have students determine the "sweet spot" on the chart for most reliable information.
• Have students pick any topic in the topic list and read complimentary articles from both the "liberal" and the "conservative" sides of the chart and identify the information that seems to be most informative in each. 
• Have students pick any topic in the topic list and read complimentary articles from both the "trustworthy" and the "untrustworthy" sides of the chart and identify reasons or tactics used that support the trustworthiness evaluation.
• Build a list of indicators of trustworthy information such as verifiable evidence, multiple reliable sources, etc.
• Build a list of indicators of untrustworthy information such as obfuscation, misdirection, vagueness, etc.
• Have students explore Snopes.com and the 2016 study of ideological rankings referenced in the Methodology area on the right.
• Have students consider the value of taking input from proponents of both sides of the issue.
• Have students brainstorm reasons why they should care about these issues, particularly those issues for which they do not have an interest.

brought to you by GLT Global ED | Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit

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File:Cognitive Bias Codex - 180+ biases, designed by John Manoogian III (jm3).jpg - Wikimedia Commons

File:Cognitive Bias Codex - 180+ biases, designed by John Manoogian III (jm3).jpg - Wikimedia Commons | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
3 October 2016

Well, I've never scooped a graphic from Wikipedia before. But, this chart is INCREDIBLE. 

Continuing with my concerns for polishing our students' skill sets for effective processing and analysis of informational reading  and listening, I came across this incredible chart that breaks down the complex nature of the sources of our biases into recognizable influences upon our thought processes each with concise descriptions of the fallacious thinking pattern associated with those biases.

I'd suggest starting from the outer ring where four essential categories where biases can be developed are identified. Moving towards the center, each section on the next ring offers a subset of possible reasons why we might have a potential bias within that category. Moving deeper into the graphic toward the graphic of a brain, specific causes of biases associated with each bias subset are listed.

For example:

(Outer Ring) Too Much Information > (Subset) We notice flaws in others more easily than we notice flaws in ourselves > (offers three possible bias causes) Bias blindspots OR Naive cynicism OR Naive realism.

Some of the inner most ring offers possible challenges to existing vocabulary for students (i.e., confabulation, functional fixedness, etc.). Therefore, it would be a good idea to not expect students to be able to connect to each and every item at the inner most ring. However, there are certainly plenty of concepts at that inner most ring that are within grasp or reach of most students.   

However, students can go to the actual original Wikipedia page (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cognitive_biases) for an extended explanation of those more challenging terms. For example, the term "Band Wagon Effect" is explained as "The tendency to do (or believe) things because many other people do (or believe) the same."

BIG TIP FOR VIEWING CHART: Click the chart to enlarge image. Then click it again to "magnify" the chart to the most readable size.

brought to you by GLT Global ED | Google Lit Trips an educational nonprofit

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