Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
An Educator's Reading List of Contemporary Literature, Literacy, and Reading Issues. Visit us at https://www.GoogleLitTrips.org
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Martin Luther King Jr.'s speech analyzed by Nancy Duarte

Nancy Duarte analyzes Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech using principles from her book, Resonate. Mapping the speech to her “presentation…
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

Leave it to a reknown graphic artist and communications expert to provide an engaging "other way" to see the power of eloquence.

 

Might be a fitting tribute to Dr. King's power of persuasion through encouraged optimism. 

 

Would you share this in your literature class? If so, how might you blend the literary reading facets of the speech with appropriate informational reading in order to make for a truly blended and engaging learning experience in your language arts classroom?

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

"Google Lit Trips" is the official fictitious business name of GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

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John Lewis looks back to original March on Washington - Video on NBCNews.com

John Lewis looks back to original March on Washington - Video on NBCNews.com | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Video on msnbc.com: Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., the only living speaker from the original March on Washington, reflects on his experience at the momentous event 50 years ago.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

It is difficult to believe that 50 years have gone by since Martin Luther King gave what has come to be known as the "I have a Dream Speech."

 

For those educators who were witnesses there or on our TV sets,we ought to take on a sacred duty to keep that moment and that message alive. 

 

Today's students have no more direct connection to that piece of history than we, as youngster had to Lincoln's assassination. It was true they know as we knew, but it was to be studied rather than to be seared into our hearts as it has been ever since to those of us who had a direct experience with the speech.

 

Today Meet the Press showed the interview with Martin Luther King and others that was broadcast three days before the march. As wonderful as this is, it was more than depressing to be reminded that 50 years ago, there were those whose only agenda seemed to be to cast any negative tone to the pending march by listing all the reasons or talking points they'd prepared in order to express anti-civil rights beliefs passed off as serious concern for problems that might arise.

http://www.nbcnews.com/video/meet-the-press/52840189#52829825

 

Having soon after the Martin Luther King memorial was dedicated on the National Mall in Washington DC, those memories came clearly back to me as I stood in the midsts of others of all colors but primarily of the age I shared with them. The silence; the small groups of friends and strangers gathering and sharing their recollections; in an incredible sacred solemnity was emotionally overwhelming.

 

There are probably few thinking and/or concerned people who haven't yet seen the incredible sculpture of Dr. King at the center of the memorial. However, the arching wall behind and on either side of that statue is not to be missed. From one end of that wall to the other there are several magnificent quotes from Dr. King. To read those quotes and to contemplate the articulations of the best of what our democracy stands for while doing so in the Washington DC of today was perhaps as distressing at the nay-sayers in the original Meet the Press interview. 

 

For those interested in being a part of the ongoing versions of the "March for Civil Rights" I am very proud to suggest that you consider exploring the Google Lit Trip that I was honored to develop in collaboration with Elizabeth Partridge the author of "Marching For Freedom: Walk Together Children and Don't You Grow Weary,"  the story of the March from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. The same march addressed in Representative John Lewis' newly released book,  "March Book One" by Representative John Lewis, and Andrew Aydin, and Nate Powell.

 

If you're seeking meaningful ways to address the best intentions of the Language Arts Common Core Standards for both Literary Reading and Informational Reading, this is certainly an opportunity to not miss.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

"Google Lit Trips" is the fictitious business name of GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

 

 

 

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