Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
An Educator's Reading List of Contemporary Literature, Literacy, and Reading Issues. Visit us at https://www.GoogleLitTrips.org
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Want More Dates? Survey Says You Should Read More Books

Want More Dates? Survey Says You Should Read More Books | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
#Truth.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
21 June 2016

Yep! And there's even an App for that!

What are you doing for your first day's lesson in your literature class?

I might well be starting with this INFORMATIONAL READING article. 

My favorite line? 

"The findings aren’t all that surprising, considering a 2014 Pew Research study that showed millennials — the generation most likely to be using dating apps — are actually more likely to have read a book in the past year than folks from other generations. While the narrative may be that books need saving, it would seem that the pastime is alive as ever."


brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit
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32-Second Video of a Hardback in a University’s Rare Books Collection Goes Viral — See What’s ‘Hidden’ in Its Pages

32-Second Video of a Hardback in a University’s Rare Books Collection Goes Viral — See What’s ‘Hidden’ in Its Pages | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Look at this book. Seems like just an old-fashioned hardback with gilt pages, right? If you were to shift the closed pages of the book just so, you'd see ... well, take a look at the video posted by Cornell University Library's Rare Books...
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

2 December 2015

 

This is so cool. I won't spoil the surprise. Let's just say great books held treasures to be discovered. In these rare cases, the treasure is hidden in the gold.

 

TEASE: Notice the 32 second video has had over 5 MILLION views!

 

But, don't miss the video lower on the page. It's a historical gem. 

Wouldn't I love to have one of these in my collection! 

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED (dba Google Lit Trips) an educational nonprofit

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Pedro’s Journal by Pam Conrad UPDATED!

Pedro’s Journal by Pam Conrad UPDATED! | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

Pedro's Journal by Pam Conrad added to list of refreshed Lit Trips in preparation for the launch of our updated website.

 

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

22 November 2014

 

Pedro's Journal by Pam Conrad added to list of refreshed Lit Trips in preparation for the launch of our updated website.

 

Google Lit Trips fans using any of the following Lit Trip titles can upgrade now. All previous versions will become obsolete once the new Google Lit Trips website is launched sometime in the next few months.

 

Pedro's Journal v3 by Pam Conrad

Brothers in Hope: The Story of the Lost Boys of Sudan v4 by Lois Lowry

Number the Stars v5 by Lois Lowry

We All Went on Safari by Laurie Krebs

Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan

Fever 1798 v2 by Laurie Halse Anderson

A Small Dog's Big Life v2 by Irene Kelly

Night by Elie Wiesel

The Slave Dancer v5 by Paula Fox

The Kite Runner v6 by Khaled Hosseini

The Grapes of Wrath v7 by John Steinbeck

Flotsam v3 by David Wiesner

Sam Patch Daredevil Jumper v4 by Julie Cummins

Going Home v3 by Margaret Wild

A Walk in London v4 by Salvatore Rubbino

A Family Apart v5 by Joan Lowery Nixon

Abuela v3 by Arthur Dorros

Big Anthony: His Story v4 by Tomie DePaola

Make Way for Ducklings v4 by Robert McCloskey

Number the Stars v4 by Lois Lowry

By the Great Hornspoon v4 by Sid Fleishman

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WWW: Take a Digital Trip Through Your Favorite Book

WWW: Take a Digital Trip Through Your Favorite Book | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Hello, all, "La lectura es el viaje de los que no pueden tomar el tren," said French playwright Francis de Croisset, according to the neat handwriting on the wall of a cafe in Buenos Aires. And now...

 

“La lectura es el viaje de los que no pueden tomar el tren,” said French playwright Francis de Croisset, according to the neat handwriting on the wall of a cafe in Buenos Aires.

 

And nowhere does that become more true than when using Google Lit Trips, a unique digital resource for educators that comes free of charge courtesy of one innovative educator and the free program Google Earth.

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

What can I say?

 

It's always such an honor when an educator chooses to endorse the Google Lit Trips project with such kind words.

 

And these kind words come, serendipitously, via The Latin American and Iberian Institute at UNM (University of New Mexico).

 

The serendipity?...

 

Within the next 7 to 10 days, I will be posting a brand new and very long awaited Google Lit Trip on one of the most requested titles for Google Lit Trip development. And, it happens to be a" Mexico --> United States" immigration story that is extremely popular in schools.

 

I'll leave the title as a tease, but will scoop it in the Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading Scoop-it blog the very moment it goes public.

 

Okay! Here's a hint... 

Just for the heck of it let's play hangman.

 

     ____

     |      |       O     -    |    -    /    \

            |

            |

            |

            |

      ___ |___

 

 

— — — — — — — — —    — — — — — —

 

 You can leave a single letter guess in the comments below and with the exception of vowels, I'll fill in the blanks as I see correct guesses.

 

However, just for fun, I'll delete any comment that attempts to guess the whole title just to keep the game going a bit longer.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

"Google Lit Trips" is the fictious business name of GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

 

 

 

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If Dr. Seuss books were titled according to their subtexts

If Dr. Seuss books were titled according to their subtexts | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it


(from Buzzfeed)

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

Who didn't love Dr. Seuss?

 

What a great introduction to an accessible learning experience of "reading between the lines." It's a classic frustration point that all too frequently leads to annoyance and reliance upon a "I'll never get it, but I can learn to fake it Thanks to Spark Notes Plan B" attitude for many students.

 

Having probably liked Dr. Seuss in childhood and gained a bit more understanding of the world by the time students reach high school, it might be quite a bit easier to only have to stretch one's Vygotsky borders by exploring the real-world references made in these retitled Dr. Seuss books. A bit of understanding of what the titles reference added to an existing recollection of fondness for these classic stories, might provide a pre-engaged interest in rereading the stories with more "grown-up" eyes.

 

A follow up exercise might be to employ the opposite strategy. Have students start with a different personal favorite childhood story and have them create retitled versions of the covers for those stories. 

 

Or have them choose a book they more recently enjoyed and have them create a retitled book cover. I would probably ask them to choose a book that they had chosen themselves rather than one that had been required reading.

 

I think the key is that they start with a book that they read and enjoyed rather than one they did not choose, may have had to struggle through because of a lack of pre-existing interest, challenging vocabulary, or plotline of no particularly attractive nature.

 

For example, a student may be a skateboarder who happened to read a book about Tony Hawk simply because the student thinks Hawk is pretty cool. That student might in retrospect see that the book might easily be retitled "Perseverance Pays Off" or "Fun Ain't Always Easy And Easy Ain't Always Fun."

 

It wouldn't need to be a time consuming experience, but maybe a single period early in the semester might be an enjoyable and worthwhile experience.

 

An alternative followup might be for students to be invited and then scheduled to bring in one or two or more of their favorite childhood books on the same day. And, then students are given a chance to  blind draw one of the books brought in that day. I'd probably have a list of the titles they brought in so that those titles would be unacceptable for this single experience. So if they did happen to blind draw a title that matches one of the books they brought in they would get to draw again until they had drawn a book other than the one they'd brought in. They might then read the book cold and then try to draw a retitled cover.

 

 ~ http:www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 

 

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A Special no cost offer & gift for cutting edge iPad using educators from Google Lit Trips!

A Special no cost offer & gift for cutting edge iPad using educators from Google Lit Trips! | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

What if you could really get Google Lit Trips to work well on an iPad?

Imagine walking down Cannery Row in Monterey, CA or around Stratford-Upon-Avon with your own personal tour guide! Imagine students from around the world creating and sharing walking tours of their nearby literary landmarks! 

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High School Removes ‘Huckleberry Finn’ Over Portrayal Of Blacks

High School Removes ‘Huckleberry Finn’ Over Portrayal Of Blacks | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Racial slurs in Mark Twain's 1885 classic are said to make some students uncomfortable.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

14 December 2015

 

WHY??? Officially because Mark Twain's insistence upon using the N-word "makes some students uncomfortable."

 

My question and challenge is, "Why isn't The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn taught in every single high school?"  Why in the world would I take that position? 

 

Because "Black Lives Matter too!"

 

What??? Consider...
Ever notice that the only "good" character from beginning to end is Jim, the runaway slave?

 

Ever notice that pretty much everyone else in the story is white and each for a variety of reasons represents the hurt caused to blacks by their unquestioned assumptions that slavery is perfectly acceptable? 

 

Ever notice that Mark Twain creates an episodic tale that includes the obvious evil behaviors of those who would in one way or another profit from slavery?

 

Ever notice that even the characters who are considered "good people" within their society do not question their acceptance of the preachers and judges who use the Bible and the law to justify slavery?

 

Ever notice that Huck is the only white person in the story who becomes uncomfortable with the way Jim is treated?

 

Ever wonder why the book ends with Huck recognizing that he "can't go back" to the brand of "black lives don't matter" civilization that he knows Aunt Sally will attempt to impose on him?

 

Ever notice that Mark Twain was a southern writer who wrote a story about the vices and follies of the slave holding south? 

 

Ever notice that everything Mark Twain wrote after Huck Finn was calling into question the wisdom and virtue of the wide variety of behaviors that were common among those who assume without doubt that they have privilege beyond those they assume do not?

 

Ever notice that The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn could not have  been written as an anti-slavery novel. It wasn't published until nearly a quarter of a century after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed. 

 

___________

 

I believe Mark Twain's intentions were sharply focused upon the vices and follies NOT addressed by the Emancipation Proclamation. That residual ugliness descended from 200 years of treating blacks as though their lives did not "really" matter even a quarter of a century after the end of slavery. And, any student who pays any attention today to how we still live in a world, both beyond and within, our borders where there is much work to be done in addressing the 21st century parallels to the vices and follies Mark Twain "put in our faces" will know that The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn may never have been more relevant than it is today.  

 

Black, Muslim, LGBT lives matter every bit as much as all lives. And, any one treating ANY group, muslim, LGBT, police, gun owners, liberals, and conservatives included, as though the bad represent the whole, is part of a very serious and inadequately attended to problem. 

 

Could it be possible that Twain was using the N-word to intentionally disturb those readers who either see themselves as treating blacks in ways very similar to the despicable characters in his story AND/OR to disturb those readers who who are fed up with being victimized.

 

Finally, a request to those who do teach The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

 

Please do not make excuses for Mark Twain's use of the N-word by "explaining" that we can't blame Twain since this was a commonly used word when Twain was writing. It was not the commonly used word by the "wise and/or virtuous." 

 

Maybe, just maybe, Twain's whole point was to  intentionally disturb the ignorant and/or evil who continued, nearly a quarter of a century after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed. to use the despicable word and to behave in the despicable ways as those who Twain criticizes had done. 

 

There's still work to be done. What 21st century Informational Reading might be a perfect match for proving that there is still work to be done.


 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org  ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED (dba Google Lit Trips) an educational nonprofit.

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Amy Winehouse, Allen Iverson, and the Importance of Seeing Our Students

Amy Winehouse, Allen Iverson, and the Importance of Seeing Our Students | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Two documentaries I saw recently got me thinking a lot about teaching, even though neither focuses on education: "Amy," about acclaimed British singer/songwriter Amy Winehouse, who died in 2011, and "Iverson," about 11-time NBA all-star and 2000-2001 Most Valuable Player, Allen Iverson.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

5 August 2015

 

I seem to have found myself noticing a ton of articles that would go right to the top of my list of great Informational Reading experiences in a classroom. 

 

This one would go to the top of two lists; those that would be great in the classroom and those that would be great in the faculty room.

 

I can't help but wonder what might happen if a teacher shared this article with his/her students sometime in the first week of the school year.

 

I might start off by saying something like...

 

"I'd like to try an experiment."

 

"I'm going to ask each of you to read an article I found online. After everyone has had a chance to finish the article, I'm going to sit down and simply listen to any stories you'd like to share with each other about favorite teachers who've made a difference in your life BECAUSE THEY CARED ABOUT YOU. 

 

"The only rule I'd like to impose is that today I want to be inspired by stories of teachers you appreciated because you knew they cared about you as a person. So today I'd rather not hear about teachers who didn't seem to care about you as a person as much as they could have." 

 

It would probably feel a bit risky, but hey, don't we frequently expect my students to be willing to take a risk and try something new?

 

I'm reminded of another of my favorite quotes ...

 

"The only thing that costs more than caring is not caring."

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips an educational nonprofit

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Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis

Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

www.GoogleLitTrips.com

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

Happy to announce the publication of our newest Google Lit Trips for Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis. This Lit Trip was developed by Dalena Luis, a graduate student from the College of Education at the University of Central Florida.

 

Bud, Not Buddy is of particular interest as it is one of the English Language Arts Common Core Standards exemplar works for Literary Reading. And, it has won several awards for Literature.

 

Bud, Not Buddy is posted both in the K-5 and the 6-8 sections of the Google Lit Trips website.

 

We have also published a Google Lit Trip for Christopher Paul Curtis' The Watsons Go to Birmingham.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the legal fictitious business name of GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit.

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Study Finds Less Anger, Disgust and Surprise in 20th Century Books

Study Finds Less Anger, Disgust and Surprise in 20th Century Books | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
A study from the University of Bristol finds mentions of anger, disgust, fear, joy, sadness, and surprise decrease in English books of the 20th century.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

This is an article I'll probably be contemplating for several days. And, I suspect it will join the legion of previously read thought-provoking articles that pop back into my consideration for some time.

 

I'm not sure if this logic holds since the article references books written over the entire 20th century. But, it did occur to me that at least for the last several years, maybe decades, publishers have used market demand more than literary excellence as a prime short listing technique when deciding what book to invest in publishing. 

 

Yes there have been great works published. And yes, market demand has influenced who or what has been published for centuries. But the recent "advances" in data mining have raised the "Trump Value" of market demand seriously. I suppose this may partially explain the success made recently in alternative publishing possibilities. So many well-written books have been rejected by the traditional publishing houses, yet have found tremendous popularity among readers open to the kinds of writing not so easily identified as "marketable to large enough audiences to justify the cost of publishing."

 

I really don't normally like to speculate based upon my immediate thoughts until I've really had a chance to reflect on them a bit. So these, "first thoughts" may be entirely off the mark.

 

However, the first thought that stimulated my decision to scoop and comment on this article had to do with the suggestion that for the last 100 years or so there has apparently been a fairly consistent trend away from stories tending to focus upon anger, disgust, fear, joy, sadness, and surprise. If this is because the market for those themes (4 of the 6 being fairly negative) then wouldn't it be interesting to run the same analysis on the most commonly taught books in classrooms?

 

What if we discovered that 4 out of 6 of the books we teach focus heavily upon negative emotions?

 

I know, I know. We need to get students to begin to understand and form personal belief systems related to how to deal with the harsh realities of life; to see the Atticus Finches showing us that good people can do good in bad societies; that Huck Finns can come to realize the evil in unexamined status quo social norms and decide to "lilght out for the Territory" because they'd come to understand that they "can't go back" to the not so civilized "sivilized" beliefs of the Aunt Sallys of the world.

 

Sometimes I wonder if we might balance the "harsh reality" lessons a bit more with some "life inspiring" examples of communities rather than just the individual hero or heroine rising above the forces of evil.

 

It's early and only a first thought, but what if there is some truth in suggesting that...

 

If we're not selling what they're buying, then we should not be surprised that they're not buying what we're selling.

 

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 

 

 

 

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Twitter / iyingchui: Literature. Hahaha! So much ...

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

Oh it hurts! And the rudeness with which the sentiment is expressed cuts deep. It's too rude to share with students, though they too often share the same sentiment among themselves.

 

So although there is no question that the comment is phrased indelicately, the rudeness aside, my question is...

 

"Is it a rude awakening of sorts?"

 

Could the teacher's interpretation have been suggested in a way that wasn't so annoying to students who don't really get it but still believe that "It seems stupid to me, but it might be on the test?" 

 

If this "might be" their simplistic reaction, then have we done them any favors in thinking we have given them welcome insights into the joys of deeper reading?

 

Or...have we missed an opportunity to make a valuable insight palatable and thereby welcome?

 

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

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NCGE "Perspective" Aug/Sept 2011

NCGE "Perspective" Aug/Sept 2011 | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

See Page 16: Nice article in NCGE (National Council for Geographic Education) Perspective journal on recent Google Lit Trips collaboration and presentation with author Toby Lester, author of The Fourth Part of the World.

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