Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
An Educator's Reading List of Contemporary Literature, Literacy, and Reading Issues. Visit us at https://www.GoogleLitTrips.org
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Finland Will Become the First Country in the World to Get Rid of All School Subjects

Finland Will Become the First Country in the World to Get Rid of All School Subjects | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
This is a real revolution in education.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
11 November 2016

And then I came across this hopeful article about the news of one of the world's most respected educational systems taking real action towards changing education so that it much more clearly reflects the way the world really is.

The headline is a bit misleading. According to the article "This system will be introduced for senior students, beginning at the age of 16." 

The concept of cross-curricular education is not new. It has been at the core of much of the 21st century educational reform movement; at least the brand of 21st century educational reform that I've put at the center of the Google Lit Trips vision. 

Global Awareness, cross-curricular, and multi-cultural studies share a common connecting vision especially when actually connected.  We are better able to see that disaggregated separate "curricular puzzle pieces" are better understood when the way they are in the real world actually inseparably interconnected provides us a means of more clearly seeing the big picture. 

brought to you by GLT Global ED | Google Lit Trips an educational nonprofit

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Here’s How Long It Took To Write Your Favorite Book

Here’s How Long It Took To Write Your Favorite Book | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Who's the speediest novelist of them all?
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
2 October 2016

The title says it all. Interesting graphic. Several titles are popular in classroom curricula. Any surprises?

By the way, titles are listed by not only "time to write" but also number of pages.

Try this, find the book with the longest writing time AND the least number of pages and calculate the time per page rate.

And of course the reverse math with the title with the shortest writing time AND the most number of pages.

brought to you by GLT Global ED | Google Lit Trips an educational nonprofit
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Take A Look At The Most Epic Map Blunders Throughout The Ages

Take A Look At The Most Epic Map Blunders Throughout The Ages | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

"An atlas of the world not as it ever existed, but as it was thought to be."

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
11 November 2016

I love having very mixed feelings about an article I anticipate either liking or disliking. I anticipated liking this article and found much to like. However, I also found myself wondering whether there was a negative bias that bumped against my own biases leaning in different directions.

The author leans towards an understandable assumption that inaccuracy is proof of blunder or lying or mythology as a sort of triumvirate of foolish or vicious falsehood.

In an ironic twist I am attracted to the video's conclusion that, "There's always more to the story."

I probably read that conclusion quite differently from the author's intention. I believe that at the Venn crossover of fact and fiction that fiction often adds an element of a greater Truth than fact alone. Not believing so would leave me thinking that his logic would dismiss the value of not only mythology, but all fiction because by definition fiction is not true.

When the author says, “Maps have an unquestionable authority, ... We’ve always thought of them as infallible, and so it’s startling and intriguing to see how wrongly they’ve sometimes shown the world to be.”

I can not read this without hearing a contemporary self-righteous condemnation of how incredibly foolish people USED TO BE when they believed "wrongly" what they were inaccurately "shown the world to be." 

Perhaps my own bias is affected by this week's headlines where there is quite disturbing evidence regarding the extent to which people today STILL  "believe wrongly" what they have been inaccurately "shown the world to be."


brought to you by GLT Global ED | Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit
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The Library of Congress Is Uploading 75 Years of Poetry and Literature Recordings

The Library of Congress Is Uploading 75 Years of Poetry and Literature Recordings | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Yesterday selections from the Archive of Recorded Poetry and Literature at the Library of Congress became available to stream online for the first time — the launch of a project digitizing some of their 2,000 recordings from the past 75 years of literature. “I think that reading
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
24 May 2016

EUREKA!

Perhaps my favorite quote from this article says it all, 
__________

“I think that reading poetry and prose on the page is important, but there’s nothing that can replace listening to literature read aloud, especially when it is read by the creator of the work,”
 ~ Catalina Gomez, project manager
__________

I've always sat on the fence about what constitutes an "original source" when speaking of plays, lyrics, and even poetry.

With plays and songs we often are at the mercy of having to experience the text rather than the performance.  In these instances, I think it is easy to justify considering text as a secondary source. Text is not the intended experience of the original piece. It's almost like suggesting that the musical score rather than the music itself is the original source even though the performance rather than the notes that constitute the instruction for delivering the performance is the intended means of communicating the work to its intended audience.

I recently had the opportunity to experience a live performance by Billy Collins and Amy Mann. It was more than the sum of Billy Collins' words and Amy Mann's lyrics. It was choreography. It was interplay. It was an audio visual close encounter with the poet and artist. 

It just doesn't seem like a huge step to include the experience of poetry in the same way. Poetry is melodic. To hear poetry read by the poet; to hear the poet's interpretation of the melody exceeds even the best we can do in reading something we did not write and did not feel as it was created is a "lesser experience." It is, at best, a simulation of the original experience..

To hear the breath of the poet is to experience the heartbeat of the poem.

And thanks to the Library of Congress, we can now get closer to the original poetry than ever before.


brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit


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