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Rescooped by Margaret Heys from Primary history- The Australian Colonies
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A History of Sydney Streets - YouTube

Historians Dr Shirley Fitzgerald and Dr Lisa Murray chat about the evolution of Sydney's streets and their names. For more Sydney History visit www.cityofsyd...

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Rescooped by Margaret Heys from NSW Stage 3: Viewing Bushfires Through Geography Lenses
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Resource 1 of 5: BTN Bushfire Recovery > Engage

Resource 1 of 5: BTN Bushfire Recovery > Engage | Google glass | Scoop.it

Behind the News: Over the summer holidays, bushfires struck many communities around Australia. For the kids that live in those areas, recovering has been a really long process. So we asked some of them to let us know how they were going in the lead-up to school going back. Rookie Reporter Kane has more.


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Nancy Ferguson 's curator insight, April 9, 2016 10:26 PM

This ‘Behind the News’ episode offers: 

• Students a relatable context when addressing the topic of bushfire hazard. The resource provides the viewers with a perspective from other school-aged students who have been affected by this natural disaster. 
 • Teachers a resource that can be used to engage a classroom as part of the 5 E’s model. 

This is an engaging and appropriate resource because it addresses the following content descriptors from the NSW Stage 3 Geography syllabus: 

Students investigate the impact of ONE contemporary bushfire hazard in Australia, for example: (ACHGK030) 
• Identification of the location and extent of the disaster M ST
• Description of the impact of the disaster on natural vegetation and the damage caused to 
communities VR 
 
• Examination of how people can prevent and minimise the effects of a bushfire

This resource is also a good example of a visual representation geographical tool. This resource could be used to develop geographical understanding and skills by: 

• Building upon students prior knowledge of bushfire hazards through observations. 
 • Enabling student inquiry

Students make observations of:
• The approximate location and extent of the bushfires 
• The impact of the bushfires on the local community and vegetation 
• Bushfire management and the roles of community members

Students explore and put forward their own questions from observing the information in this video resource. Teachers can then support students in refining their questions to create deeper inquiry questions that explore:

• The implications and interactions of bushfires 
• How people’s connections to places affect their perception of them. 
 • The factors that shape place, “what is it about the Australian landscape, environment and geographic location that influences the occurrences of bushfire hazards.” 

Suggested teaching strategy for this resource:
 
Brainstorming, this method allows students to contribute without justifying or elaborating on their ideas. Divide students into groups and they are to come up with three tricky questions about bushfires. Then students can come up with as many different ways as to how they could find the answers to their questions. 

This resource could be used as a visual representation stimulus for an introductory lesson to a bushfire hazard unit of work.

References

BOSTES,. (2015). Geography K-10 Syllabus Volume 1: K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies, Teaching and Educational Standards NSW.


Rescooped by Margaret Heys from NSW Stage 3: Viewing Bushfires Through Geography Lenses
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Resource 2 of 5: Teaching with Spatial Technology through Sentinel > Explore

Resource 2 of 5: Teaching with Spatial Technology through Sentinel > Explore | Google glass | Scoop.it
Australia Sentinel Hotspots Mapping System

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Nancy Ferguson 's curator insight, April 3, 2016 2:51 AM
This bushfire mapping tool offers students a:

• Spatial technologies geographical tool 
• Virtual learning experience 

This resource should be used because it: 

• Can be used to build the field before future quantitative data fieldwork experience where students collect statistical data of temperatures, humidity and wind speed. 
 • Focuses on the student outcome of identifying the location and extent of a disaster 
• Is a great interactive tool that students can use explore and analyse data

How can students can use this resource to develop geographical understanding and skills?

• Students navigate through the ‘Historic Hotspot Search’ tool located on the top, right hand side of the webpage
• Students locate areas that were affected by bushfires such as those shown in the BtN Bush Fire recovery story 
• Students collect qualitative data 
• Students explore the details of the affected areas and the finer details such as the temperature and power of the fires. 
• Teachers can build on this virtual experience and go on to conducting outside the classroom fieldwork experience 

These ideas can help students to develop geographical skills that enable them to extract relevant information from digital sources, find material using search engines and to improve their map skills. 

When could students/teachers use this resource?

Teachers could use this resource as part of the explore phase of the five E's model. 

References

Australian Geography Teachers Association (n.d). Retrieved from: http://www.geogspace.edu.au/support-units/fieldwork/fi-overview.html

BOSTES,. (2015). Geography K-10 Syllabus Volume 1: K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies, Teaching and Educational Standards NSW.
Rescooped by Margaret Heys from NSW Stage 3: Viewing Bushfires Through Geography Lenses
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Engaging and Relevant Teaching Resources for NSW Stage 3 Geography: Bushfire Hazard

We are currently living in an information-rich environment and it is important that we as teachers use a variety of digital and print resources in the classroom. However, it is also our job to use tools such as checklists for evaluating and selecting appropriate resources (Marsh, C., Clarke, M., & Pittaway, S. (2014). The following series of Scoop it resources have been thoughtfully organised and evaluted to target the NSW Geography Stage 3 syllabus. You may find these resources helpful if you are looking for content specifically focusing on the overarching big idea of “factors that shape places” and the content of “Bushfire hazard”. There is a total of five resources that I have curated for this topic. For each resource I have briefly described:

 
> What the resource offers
> Why the resource should be used
> How students could use the resource to develop geographical understanding and skills
> When students/teachers could use this resource
> The alignment between the resource to the focused syllabus outcomes and content

Targeted syllabus details for guidance has been listed below: 

Stage 3 Statement

STAGE 3 By the end of Stage 3, students describe the diverse characteristics of places in different locations across local and global scales. They explain interactions between people, places and environments and identify factors influencing interconnections. Students compare spatial distributions and patterns among phenomena. They explore how people respond to a geographical challenge and investigate reasons for differing perspectives. Students develop geographical questions to frame an inquiry. They use a variety of strategies to locate, collect and record relevant data and information to answer inquiry questions. They represent data in different forms. Students interpret data and other information to identify and compare spatial distributions, patterns and trends, infer relationships and draw conclusions. They present findings and ideas using geographical terminology in a range of communication forms. They propose solutions, and may take action, in response to a geographical challenge and describe the expected effects of their proposal.

Key Inquiry Question:
How do people’s connections to places affect their perception of them?

Outcome: 
• acquires, processes and communicates geographical information using geographical tools for inquiry GE3-4

Bushfire hazard Students: 
• investigate the impact of ONE contemporary bushfire hazard in Australia, for example: (ACHGK030) 
- identification of the location and extent of the disaster victoria - description of the impact of the disaster on natural vegetation and the damage caused to communities 
 - examination of how people can prevent and minimise the effects of a bushfire

References:

BOSTES,. (2015). Geography K-10 Syllabus Volume 1: K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies, Teaching and Educational Standards NSW.

Marsh, C., Clarke, M., & Pittaway, S. (2014). Marsh’s Becoming a Teacher. Frenches Forest, NSW: Pearson

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Nancy Ferguson 's curator insight, April 10, 2016 3:53 AM
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Rescooped by Margaret Heys from HSIE K-6
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Planning for teaching through inquiry - Enquiring Minds

The Enquiring Minds 'enquiry cycle' is an approach to planning and carrying out any sort of enquiry-based activity. This enquiry model can be used by teachers and students to help visualise progress on any extended activity.

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, March 10, 2014 9:03 PM

Inquiry learning is at the heart of HSIE K-6. Research suggests students produce knowledge when they investigate a situation. The challenge for primary teachers is to know how to plan effective learning activities that provide the opportunity for their students to build knowledge, develop skills and learn in an engaging way. The resources on this UK based website provide a useful planning framework that can be adapted for HSIE K-6 and the new Australian Curriculum.

 

Rescooped by Margaret Heys from The 21st Century
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My First 100 Days With Google Glass

My First 100 Days With Google Glass | Google glass | Scoop.it
One developer's look through Google Glass sees the augmented world isn't so rosy yet.

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roberto gilli's curator insight, September 26, 2013 3:27 AM

Quote: "Actually, all Glass needs to be is a platform for augmented reality."

Rescooped by Margaret Heys from NSW Stage 3: Viewing Bushfires Through Geography Lenses
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Resource 5 of 5: Evaluate Students Learning Using These Five Different Case Studies

Resource 5 of 5: Evaluate Students Learning Using These Five Different Case Studies | Google glass | Scoop.it
Evaluate: The final phase provides an opportunity for students to review and reflect on their own learning and new understanding and skills. It is also when students provide evidence for changes to their understanding, beliefs and skills.

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Nancy Ferguson 's curator insight, April 10, 2016 8:36 AM
Link to Resource: 
This resource is a tool for teachers to assess and evaluate student learning. These case studies provide students with the opportunity to apply their prior knowledge to assess five different bushfire situations.Students should then justify their decisions. 

This resource should be used because it: 

• Makes connections between the 4 other resources listed as part of this scoop it topic. 
• Requires prior knowledge of: 

➢ What bushfires are 
➢ Where bushfires occur 
➢ The impact of bushfires on natural vegetation and the damage to communities 
➢ How bushfires behave 
➢ What causes bushfires 
➢ Aboriginal fire management 

 Students can use this resource to develop geographical understanding and skills through: 

• Providing evidence for any changes to their understanding, beliefs and skills. 
• Reviewing and reflecting on their own learning and new understanding and skills. 

Suggested teaching strategy for this resource:

A good strategy could be 'Sketch to stretch', after students read through each case studies they can use this visualisation technique can help to create a mental image. Then once students have transferred their mental interpretation of the text to a sketch they can begin to unpack the finer details of each case study.

This resource can be used at the conclusion of a unit of work to evaluate student learning. However it could also be used at somewhere near the beginning of a unit of work as a printed stimulus for students to base their inquiry questions around. 

References:

BOSTES,. (2015). Geography K-10 Syllabus Volume 1: K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies, Teaching and Educational Standards NSW.

Rescooped by Margaret Heys from NSW Stage 3: Viewing Bushfires Through Geography Lenses
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Digital Resource 3 of 5: How Bushfires Behave > Explain

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Nancy Ferguson 's curator insight, April 3, 2016 2:52 AM

This resource offers students a visual representation of bushfire behaviour. It is an approved Australian Government factsheet that includes an annotated diagram of a fire triangle. Referring to this factsheet students examine the preventative measures that people can take in order to minimise the effects of a bushfire. A part of being able to prevent and minimise the damages of a bushfire is to gain an understanding of bushfire behaviour.

This resource should be used because it focuses on: 

• The student outcome: examination of how people can prevent and minimise the effects of a bushfire. 
• Relevant vocabulary 
• Defining terms associated to bushfire hazards. 

How could students use the resource to develop geographical understanding and skills? 

Students can:

> Use the factsheet to explain the behaviour of bushfires. 
> Brainstorm a list of different fuels of fire                 
> Research the difference between low, medium, high and extreme bushfire risk situations 
> Conduct research and collect data of current temperatures, wind conditions, how dry it is and when it rained last 
> Refer to the fire triangle fact sheet, then walk around their school to identify any bushfire hazards and fuels that may place the school under threat during the bushfire season. 
                    o Students list items that need to be managed, they also describe why they need to be managed and how they can be managed. 
                    o Students write a report detailing their findings. 

This resource can be used prior to an outdoor fieldwork activity (walk around the school). This is a great source scaffold student learning by identifying the different types of bushfire fuels and the ways in which a bushfire behaves before students investigate and collect data. 

Suggested teaching strategy for this resource:

Think, pair, share This strategy would work well because it would encourage students to analyse the information from the resource, omit irrelevent information before communicating their findings with their peer.


Rescooped by Margaret Heys from NSW Stage 3: Viewing Bushfires Through Geography Lenses
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Resource 4 of 5: 12 Canoes, an Aboriginal Perspective on Fire Management > Elaborate


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Nancy Ferguson 's curator insight, April 10, 2016 8:06 AM

Authenticity of this resource: 

This resource has been developed based on the perspectives of “the Yolngu people whose homeland is the Arafura Swamp of north-central Arnhem Land in the Northern Territory” (Lewis, Robert 2016). 

What does this resource offer? 

This study guide is an extremely profound teaching resource. It has been designed for the “Twelve canoes” website and it contains teaching approaches for each of the twelve featured segments. The segment of “seasons” is the resource that is most relevant for the focus topic of bushfire hazard (refer to pages 13-15). 

This resource should be used because: 

 • It focuses on the student outcome of examination of how people can prevent and minimise the effects of a bushfire and description of the impact of bushfire on natural vegetation and the damage caused to communities. 

 How does this resource link to the student learning outcomes? 

• The study guide provides information on the nature and impact of fire on the air, soil, water, animals, birds, reptiles and insects in the savannah area of northern Australia. 
 • It utilises annotated diagrams 
• It describes Aboriginal fire management. “One feature of Arnhem Land life is fire. Fire is a key traditional Indigenous management tool used in the area (Lewis, Robert 2016).” 
• Students discover how Indigenous Australians use fire to manage Country.
 • Students recognise that Australia’s indigenous people use their knowledge of seasons and local conditions to produce cool burns that are sensitive to local ecosystems. 
• Students understand that cool burns have a lower ecological impact than the more damaging wildfires, which may occur later in the season.

How could students use the resource to develop geographical understanding and skills? 

In order for students to use this resource to develop geographical understanding and skills they should consider the following issue:

Management is about control. But it is also about choices. So, do we manage bush fires for the benefit of people and property, in which case the environment will change; or do we manage it for the environment, which means that people have to change the way they live?

When could students/teachers use this resource? 

This resource can be used during the ‘Elaborate’ phase as part of the 5 E’s model. This resource can provide opportunities for students to apply what they have learned through their inquiry-learning journey so far to develop a deeper understanding of the ideas linked to this topic.

Suggested teaching strategy for this resource: 
The question box method. This method could work well with this resource because it can provide students with complete anonymity. This allows students to ask questions without the associated pressures. 

References:

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority ACARA. (2013). Australian Curriculum: Geography. ACARA, Sydney. Retrieved from http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au

Craven, R. (1969). The selection criteria for the evaluation of Aboriginal Studies and Torres Strait Islander Studies. Retrieved from http://opac.library.usyd.edu.au

Lewis, Robert. Twelve Canoes (ATOM Study Guide). 1st ed. ATOM, 2016. Web. 4 Apr. 2016.
Rescooped by Margaret Heys from 21st Century Technology Integration
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The Guide to Google Drive Sharing

The Guide to Google Drive Sharing | Google glass | Scoop.it
Kasey will be presenting at the following events this summer: Texas Google Summit (Brenham, Texas) Grand Prairie ISD Tech Week iPadpalooza   Lonestar TIA Instructional Technology Symposium Connect...

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Aryaoka's curator insight, June 24, 2014 9:58 AM

Google drive sudah tidak asing lagi dikalangan pecinta tempat penyimpanan 'cloud'. Banyak hal yang bisa dilakukan dengan google drive.

Patrice Bucci's curator insight, June 24, 2014 1:52 PM

For those "going google"...

Rescooped by Margaret Heys from HSIE K-6
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5. Discover Dairy! Going from Farm to Plate

5. Discover Dairy! Going from Farm to Plate | Google glass | Scoop.it

Here you will find a comprehensive unit of work that clearly demonstrates all of the stages involved in the creation of Australian dairy products - from milk production on the farm to arrival at supermarkets.


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Martin Yoon's curator insight, April 6, 2014 11:36 PM

This interactive website provides students with information about; dairy farming in Australia, how cows are milked, the day to day duties of dairy farmers on the farm and in the office, and how dairy farmers reduce energy use through energy-efficient water cooling systems and plant equipment. The website allows students to develop a better understanding of the nutritional benefits of milk and how it can be categorised as a 'need.' The “Milk from Farm to Plate-What’s it all About?” interactive animation is engaging for students and takes them through the process of how milk ends up in supermarkets. Students develop an awareness of how technologies, workers, users and the environment are interconnected in a process to produce milk.

 

Students develop a better understanding of the growing use of technology in dairy farming by introducing to students the term ‘robotic milking.’ Students have the opportunity to watch Winnindoo Dairy Farm in Victoria through online ‘In Dairy’ cameras to get an up close look at how this new technology is used to collect milk. When students use these multimedia simulations, animations and live camera footage of diary cows it 'affords students the opportunity to transcend the passive learner role and to take control of their learning’ (Mishra and Koehler, 2006, p.1035).

 

As a learning strategy, students can identify ways in which previous generations in local farming communities would produce bottled milk without the prevalance of todays technology. This can be through an excursion to Glenmore Gavana Holsteins Dairy Farm (NSW) which includes fun tours and information appropriate for stage one students about past and modern dairy farming.

Hence, this website is a fantastic way to explore the interconnections between technology, workers, users and the environment in an interactive and fun way. According to Marsh (2008) ‘computer technology benefits the classroom because it provides the flexibility to meet the individual needs and abilities of each student, provides students with immediate access to rich source materials beyond the school and beyond the nation, motivates and stimulates learning and enables the teachers to move from information-giver or instructor, to facilitator of learning’ (p.202-203). 

 

Reference list

Marsh, C. J. (2008). Becoming a Teacher: Knowledge, Skills and Issues. Australia: Frenchs Forest, Pearson Australia.

Mishra, P. & Koehler, M.J.(2006). Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge: A Framework for Teacher Knowledge. Teachers College Record, 18 (6), pp.1017-1054.