Good Pedagogy
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Good Pedagogy
Good teaching and learning pedagogy for WPL
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Google's Secrets Of Innovation

Google's Secrets Of Innovation | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Lesson learnt from the corporate world: people look for meaning in their work, as students look for meaning in their study, and teachers look meaning in their teaching. As we innovate our pedagogies and technologies, what does it mean to each of the stakeholders?
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Herding Cats

Herding Cats | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it
I don't know why when we think of MOOC, we tend to form a conception that the teacher bound to treat the students en masse; maybe it's the M, "massively", but when we offer an online course to the mass, like really large mass, does it has to be all at once? If we can innovate the temporal dimension, then maybe the MOOC can be offered in batches of smaller group, but still allow students to learn from the past students as if they are there and maybe even bring the old (graduated) students to dip in and out as part of their "continuous learning" while earning advanced badges and interacting with the new students who are earning their first. If you like to draw a comparison with MMORPG (Massively Multi-player Online Role Playing Game), think of it like you are a young level 7 padawan (Jedi apprentice) solving a mission together with a level 17 Jedi Counsellor. And i deliberately didn't use the word "helped", since the mission does require the skill of the level 7 Padawan and level 17 Jedi; so no one is at an absolute advantageous position over the other. Sounds too much science fiction? Probably, but the thought arise when reading this article. In an authentic problem solving scenario, anyone with reasonable range of skill can make authentic and valuable contribution to the collaboration table. A fresh perspective, or even cross discipline studies where a graduates of one MOOC invited to participate in another MOOC with relevant topic. I thinking if nothing else, at least MOOC is an opportunity for us to explore and test the boundaries of pedagogies. It's too soon to pass judgment about it, there are so many permutations and possibilities to explore.
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A Small Collection of Studies of iPad Use in Education

A Small Collection of Studies of iPad Use in Education | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it

"This week I got the itch to go beyond anecdotal stories about iPads in the classroom and look for some more substantial research and writing on the topic. Below are some of the reports that I’ve been reading through this week."


Via John Evans
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Attention Higher Ed: MOOCs Have A Message For You

Attention Higher Ed: MOOCs Have A Message For You | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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A Simple Guide To 4 Complex Learning Theories - Edudemic

A Simple Guide To 4 Complex Learning Theories - Edudemic | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Do you know the actual theories of learning? A learning theory is an attempt to describe how people learn, helping us understand this inherently complex process.
Andreas Kuswara's insight:

I’m not a big fan of info-graphics, as sometimes I found that there are more energy poured for aesthetic aspect than content, although I acknowledge that a good one could be a powerful medium to convey information and making point.

 

One thing that intrigue me from this particular one is the suggestion that digital age learning is all about recognize and make connection. While I understand that with the advent of internet, web 2, mesh up and everything else that boil to one point: there are too much information and we struggle with it; doesn’t mean that learning is just about connecting the dots between this and that. I might be more incline to say that it is part of the basic literacy of the digital age.

 

I would also avoid judging adding connectivism to the plethora of learning theories we already have would make it complete. “Complete” is a rather strong word to use, one may say “complete for now” maybe if we really need to have that sense of completeness.

 

But it intrigues us to think, what is the new pedagogy of the digital age? Is there one? Should there be one? Would there be a pedagogy that is no longer relevant due to advent of digital age? Curious to have those conversation.

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Kids LOVE new school!

P.K. Yonge Developmental Research School at the University of Florida has redesigned school and the kids LOVE it! http://pkyonge.ufl.edu music: "Wallpaper" K...
Andreas Kuswara's insight:

The collaboration which enabled by the physical architect influenced the practice of teaching in the school (K12), which in turn shape the way students learn.

 

i think online landscape has comparable impact; how do we use the affordances or what affordances we bring into our online landscape to facilitate new teaching and learning.

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Go Slow, Quickly: Make the Move to Mobile

Go Slow, Quickly: Make the Move to Mobile | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Andreas Kuswara's insight:

i do it all the time, trains, toilets (included) or even when taking a lunch time walk is the time i read my news and curate in scoop.it or elsewhere through my phone. by the time i hit the desk, i can be bogged down with the screen and can't look the bigger picture of the fascinating education technology landscape in the world. 

 

so i disagree that we can't learn using a phone. there are many affordances that the phone offer. the article essentially attempted to separate the "learning" with "learning faster" (i deliberately avoid using the word "better" at this point). then categorically place making things faster as a "performance support" rather then modifying the "learning" it self.

 

"The strength of mobile is not learning; it is performance support. It screams for delivery of when-you-need-it, where-you-need-it, and only-as-much-as-you-need assistance. Whenever you see mobile learning, read it as mobile performance support"

 

well, that's one way to see it, but i think many would argue the advent of new technological affordances can actually afford us new pedagogy, the "performance support" factor enables new learning. that's why it's so fascinating about to see the development of EdTech. 

 

i completely agree with what the article said, and here i quote "Let’s learn from the past. Heed the lessons from early e-learning with these warnings: Do not jump too fast for the sake of the technology itself, and do not delay learning, discovering and experimenting. Fools rush in. More fools wait too long.". it required great wisdom :)

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TED-Ed: Lessons Worth Sharing

TED-Ed: Lessons Worth Sharing | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Use engaging videos on TED-Ed to create customized lessons. You can use, tweak, or completely redo any lesson featured on TED-Ed, or create lessons from scratch based on any video from YouTube.
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Andreas Kuswara's curator insight, February 10, 2013 10:13 PM

TED leverage their existing videos, add annimated illustration to cater various modalities of learning preferences, allowing people to take lessons and track them; flip it over to make your own, modify splice and dice the lessons. mx and mesh resources from YouTube into it. 

 

interesting afforadnces.

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How A Classroom Of iPads Changed My Approach To Learning

How A Classroom Of iPads Changed My Approach To Learning | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it
What happens when you deploy new iPads and use an old way of thinking? Or when you actually let students take iPads home? This is how iPad implementation went down at the Redlands College.
Andreas Kuswara's insight:

Traditionally ICT in school was (and most cases still is) deployed through computer labs, where a centralized shared ICT infrastructures made available in specific location with restrictive access time. 

 

What the recent trend in technology has done about this is to break that picture all together. NMC's Higher Education Edition of 2013 Horizon Report lists tablet computing as the 'less than one year' innovation which will get to mainstream. Looking at the current devices offerings available in the consumer market, I believe that prediction is very likely to occur. One to one student-computer ratio, would make a significant changes in the practice of teaching and learning, even in traditional classrooms. 

 

I like to refer to the old article by Dr. Vannevar Bush, a Director of the Office of Scientific Research and Development- USA, in Atlantic Magazine on July 1945 (before I was born). http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1945/07/as-we-may-think/303881/?single_page=true

 

What was envisioned by Bush has become more and more a reality, and exceeded ten folds over with the proliferation of mobile devices that allow the majority of students to connect to the internet almost constantly, with a relatively high speed data connection. It's personal learning, it's persistent learning, it's different than what the ecosystem used to be. Pedagogically something might need to change.

 

As the devices become more and more personal, learning can take a very different form than what it was before. The affordances that the technology bring to the learning plate can also open up new possibilities for new pedagogies, not necessarily entirely new, but by significantly remove factors that would traditionally become hindrance, we allow better deployment of those pedagogies.

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MOOCs are a fundamental misperception of how teaching works

MOOCs are a fundamental misperception of how teaching works | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it
During break (e.g., multi-hour long car rides), I gave a lot of thought to MOOCs and the changes that are coming to higher education. I realized that people can only believe that MOOCs can replace ...

Via Mike Keppell
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Andreas Kuswara's comment, January 31, 2013 8:36 PM
I think many people actually have a misperception about MOOC either, I believe the author might slightly off in this matter either. MOOC seems to have become a widely misunderstood animal by both supporters and oppositions alike. I agree with the writer that MOOC doesn’t replace teachers; if we can find anything, any physical object, already exists in today’s classroom, just to illustrate what MOOC’s role could be, I would probably pick up the classroom itself.
MOOC is like a classroom with plenty of interesting, can be useful, stuffs attached to it, hanged to it; like a classroom with a contact list attached to it next to a phone, so we can contact support, is what the “help” menu provides. It might have a class directory consisting the names of other students, so we can contact each other, it has a blackboard and projector, which are screens to display various contents, text and graphics, etc. it provides chairs where students can sit down and talk to each other, forming collaborative learning. the discussion in the classroom can only be as effective as the engagement of the students as collaborators to discuss. We never argue that a classroom can replace a teacher, neither can MOOC replace teachers.
However, just as when we introduce the interactive board to the classroom, something changes to the classroom. Something can change to the way teacher teach. Something can change to the way student discuss and collaborate. As any piece of equipment introduced to the classroom, a potential affordance is introduced into the ecosystem; because we see the environment – classroom – not simply as an environment, but also as an ecosystem.
MOOC is, I believe, an ecosystem for learning; which can’t alienate any member of a learning ecosystem. Of course, when one expand this ecosystem to include the university administrators, building operator, etc to form a super-ecosystem, a different story can emerge. But let’s see MOOC as a learning ecosystem for learning. How each organism live in this ecosystem might change, how each organism interact with each other might change; for the better, we hope.
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Looking at MOOCs from Gartner's Hype Cycle

Looking at MOOCs from Gartner's Hype Cycle | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it
RT @e_trude: Great articel! Must read #mooc Why MOOCs are like Farmville http://t.co/n8GTN2gy via @zite #mmc13

Via Helen Farley
Andreas Kuswara's insight:

from birth, to its peak of inflated expectations, descending into the trough of disillusionment, and finally, -- we hope so -- reaching the slope of enlightment where we can get to the real innovation that MOOC can afford.

 

very enlighting reading.

 

I don't know what the story with Farmvile, or how the author draws paralel with it; but doesn't matter. still interesting reading.

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MOOCs are your friends

MOOCs are your friends | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it
(I know what you're thinking: "if only someone would write an opinion blog post on MOOCs, there just aren't any out there"). Reactions to MOOCs tend to fall into two camps. The first is the MOOC...
Andreas Kuswara's insight:

an interesting opinion piece on MOOC

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Reflecting on MOOCs ("Stanford's Online Strategy", Campus Technology)

Andreas Kuswara's insight:

Article: "Stanford's Online Strategy", Campus Technology

 

i think the most honest and sober assessment of MOOCs comes from John Mitchell, Stanford University, "we really don't know where all this will lead. We’re just committed to improving education as much as we can". it's still experimental and big potential to disrupt the formal education either politically, culturally, pedagogically, etc. but "MOOCs will never replace the incredibly vibrant campus experience", which i think it's true, if your campus does have a vibrant campus experience; otherwise your student might eventually start questioning, why are they there in your campus.

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Digital literacy: learn to code, coding to learn

Digital literacy: learn to code, coding to learn | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it
When you learn to read, you can then read to learn. And it’s the same thing with coding. Here, 10 venues where you can learn coding.

Via Stephanie Sandifer
Andreas Kuswara's insight:

The so called digital natives, children of today, they are familiar with the use of technology but not necessarily mean they are fluent to creatively create things with it. Analogues to expert to read but can’t write. Interesting and I tend to agree with the speaker. In this video the speaker then move to promote programming or coding as part of the learning creativity; it might be one size fits all to all subject matter, we can find ways in to be a creative digital ‘writer’, not just ‘reader’.

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"Doing Projects" Vs. "Project Based Learning"

"Doing Projects" Vs. "Project Based Learning" | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Thanks to Amy Mayer of FriEdTechnology for this fantastic comparison describing the key differences between "doing projects" and project-based learning! This, my friends, is exactly what I have bee...
Andreas Kuswara's insight:

The comparison table obviously open for debate and critics, but i agree to the author, just by incorporating projects into a unit, doesn't make it a project based learning.

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The Wrath Against Khan

The Wrath Against Khan | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Andreas Kuswara's insight:

this is an old article but i think it remain relevant until now; we have so many producers of content, such as Khan Academy, even TED launch the education version where different videos packed together for a topic, which reminds me of the way we can cherry pick chapters from book to print customized books for our classes (back then it was an innovation from the print publishers), the concept similar with different media, today's media is video, it can carry much emotional affordance depending on the style of the speaker, which can help to nail the concept to our minds, and we have heaps of excellent speakers, which is good.

 

But can those all replace pedagogy? 

 

with the new experimentations where people drop off computer devices with no instruction and watch with fascination how students taught themselves how to use it. Would that mean the importance of pedagogy diminished?

 

With so many discussion reminding us that our current education model had risen from the industry revolution; were our pedagogies also came from the same context and thus heading towards irrelevance?

 

How much difference it is the landscape of human minds today that would force us to change the way we approach learning? Should education lead this change? Or should we focus to educate as best as possible for today? And be effective in it, stop forcing ourselves to guess and agonize on what’s going to be in the next 5 or 10 years; since nobody can tell what the future will be anyway. if every aspect of society: education, business, etc. all push to innovate, would it not push the rate of changes to be faster than it was or is, and thus self-defeating the innovation since newer innovation will arise that makes the upcoming innovation soon obsolete? Is this sustainable?

 

I’m not against innovation, on the contrary my personal tendency is to push it further; I’m just letting my mind loose to ponder and wonder.

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Are iPads Creating A New Instructional Ecosystem

Andreas Kuswara's insight:

The article is a good read to introduce some of the generic benefits of using iPad or any tablet that are widely available; most of the affordances specified in the article are generic across all devices that have tablet form-factor. But the last two, the issue of authentic assessment and the introduction of new model of self-directed learning and pedagogy require deeper thoughts as they are the kind of affordances that would not readily available out of the box.

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Presentation Materials - Leading Change in Changing Times: EdTechTeacher iPad Summit USA

Presentation Materials - Leading Change in Changing Times: EdTechTeacher iPad Summit USA | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Andreas Kuswara's insight:

there are various presentations and talks from the summit that you might find useful and see if they are applicable within your context. many attempt to address the deeper learning issues using iPad (or any mobile tablet in that matter).

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What most schools don't teach

Learn about a new "superpower" that isn't being taught in in 90% of US schools. It's fcinating argument about how learning something can influence your way of thinking. Something to ponder when designing curriculum.
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New Version of Blooms Taxonomy for iPad

New Version of Blooms Taxonomy for iPad | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it

"Blooms Taxonomy is one of our topical themes in Educational Technology and Mobile Learning. Over the last couple of years, we have been posting dozens of articles on how teachers can can apply the HOTS ( Higher Order Thinking Skills ) in their teaching. You can check the resources below to learn more.

 

In this post we worked on some iPad apps that go along with each of the skills mentioned in Blooms Taxonomy. We have based our work on the popular Poster Langwiches made before but because she missed hyperlinking the apps we tried to avoid this mistake in the table below. Just click on any app and you will be automatically directed to its homepage where you can download it." from source: http://www.educatorstechnology.com


Via Peter Mellow
Andreas Kuswara's insight:

I probably won't map them to a group of Apps, since I think creating, or evaluating, or anything can be supported by an app, but not exclusively occur within an app.

 

what's the best way of looking at place of technology in learning. some people attempt to map a technology to a pedagogy, some attempt to map apps to toxonomy, are these approaches helpful? useful? simplify to convey the affordance of technology? why?

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Angela C. Dowd's comment, February 25, 2013 2:55 PM
I'm new to the idea of using apps in this way. It seems a great way to connect with technology as a first step. I received a comment on another related post by Allan Carrington and I agree with what he said..."it's not about just mapping a pedagogical method or approach to an App or a series of Apps in a sequence. It is about mapping everything back to graduate attributes, values and capabilities"
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Given Tablets but No Teachers, Ethiopian Children Teach Themselves

Given Tablets but No Teachers, Ethiopian Children Teach Themselves | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it
A bold experiment by the One Laptop Per Child organization has shown “encouraging” results.
Andreas Kuswara's insight:

a report from MIT Technology Review

 

maybe tablet affords some primitive pedagogies which teachers should no longer focus to use, as it become "natural" to the digital natives.

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Is a 100,000:1 Student-to-Teacher Ratio Appealing?

Is a 100,000:1 Student-to-Teacher Ratio Appealing? | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it
MOOCs capitalize on the limitations of higher educations. (Is a 100,000:1 Student-to-Teacher Ratio Appealing? - http://t.co/2Z7c44Wj #mooc)

Via Helen Farley
Andreas Kuswara's insight:

i think it's one facet of MOOC, which is its "scalable affordance", the unpacking of "M" of MOOC for "Massive"; can we ever see MOOC from a balance perspective of all what it is, Massive, Open, Online, and Course; so we won't be trapped unrealistic or even irrelevant hype, and can exploit useful affordances.

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Mooc credits vs Uni degree

Mooc credits vs Uni degree | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Andreas Kuswara's insight:

a perspective (for now) from Coursera's Andrew Ng about their positionig of the MOOC credits in relation to the traditional university degree. 

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An insider's guide: what it's really like to study a MOOC

An insider's guide: what it's really like to study a MOOC | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Anyone who has been paying attention to higher education this year will have heard of the MOOC – courses from prestigious universities offered for free online.There’s been great interest in them from…...
Andreas Kuswara's insight:

James Farrell gave his insight on MOOC from a first person's view: as a student. it raise a question in my mind, if MOOC is a disruptive innovation or - as James suggest - a distracting innovation, diverging us away from what we should be focusing on, education and pedagogies.

 

 

i think, more discussion should be done to discuss the pedagogical impact, or pedagogical approach to take advantage of the new affordances that MOOC mode delivery offers or emphazied on.

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