God's Eye View
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Images: Black Holes of the Universe

Images: Black Holes of the Universe | God's Eye View | Scoop.it
Black holes are some of the universe's most enigmatic and mysterious objects. Take a tour of some of the most famous ones in the cosmos.
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Tariq Malik the Managing Editor for space.com. Showing us a collection of images of black-holes collected from NASA high-powered telescopes.

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Cassidy Nelson's comment, December 1, 2014 12:59 AM
Those kind of make me think of nuclear explosions. Like the mushroom clouds? Interesting.
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Broadcast your point of view with Livestream's new Google Glass app

Broadcast your point of view with Livestream's new Google Glass app | God's Eye View | Scoop.it
NAB 2014 wouldn't be the same without Livestream, one of the internet's most popular broadcasting services, introducing new hardware or software. As such
Edgar's insight:

Associate Editor & Lead Video Producer Edgar Alvarez at Engadget. He talks about a "Livestream" app coming to Google Glass. The app gives you the ability to stream live footage through your Google Glass device.

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How Google Glass will usher in an era of superhuman vision | ExtremeTech

How Google Glass will usher in an era of superhuman vision | ExtremeTech | God's Eye View | Scoop.it
Glass may be for geeks now, but that could all change once computational photography starts to give wearable cameras amazing new capabilities.
Edgar's insight:

David Cardinal is a professional photographer and technologist Also, has two decades working in high tech. We are given various application ideas that Google Glass expects to have integrated into their hardware. With the combination of virtual reality and augmented reality. We will be capable through the use of Google Glass of things such as: super vision, x-ray vision, personalized HUD, etc. Terminator vision!

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What would it be like to spend a month in virtual reality?

Next year, artist Mark Farid wants to give up a month of his life to virtual reality. If a crowdfunding campaign succeeds, he’ll spend 28 days in a gallery, wearing a VR headset and a pair of...
Edgar's insight:

Tech correspondent Adi Robertson for The Verge. She writes about how a man named, Mark Farid will be taking the identity of another person for 28 days, through the use of virtual reality technology. Using a VR headset he will be experiencing life from another person's point of view. The information will be fed from the other persons camera that they will be wearing 24/7.

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Cassidy Nelson's comment, December 1, 2014 12:22 AM
I think it would psychologically alter somebody. It's possible that it could physically alter their brain. In a sense, that puts the user in a kind of situation like Boethius paints, where God is outside of time. The user in this virtual reality would also be outside of time.
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Bedroom-bound quadriplegic develops drone to see the world - Telegraph

Bedroom-bound quadriplegic develops drone to see the world - Telegraph | God's Eye View | Scoop.it
Stuart Turner, who has spina bifida, uses head movements to pilot the camera-mounted flying device, thousands of miles from his Yorkshire home
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Through the combination of an AR Parrot drone and Google Glass. Stuart Turner a quadriplegic has developed and gained access to flying in the sky. He controls the drone with head movements with the Google Glass.

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Cassidy Nelson's comment, December 1, 2014 12:21 AM
That's amazing! I'm happy for him. This is one of the big positives of drones that aren't really highlighted. Mostly, people talk about the doom and destruction that they could bring to our country. I do think that drones do have a few (yes.. few) good uses.
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Artist creates nanosculptures smaller than a human hair

Artist creates nanosculptures smaller than a human hair | God's Eye View | Scoop.it
A statue so tiny that it cannot be seen by the naked eye has been produced using a new 3D printing technique. Measuring a picayune 20 x 80 x 100 microns, it...
Edgar's insight:

The smallest sculptures to date, Nanosculptures. An artist creating these through the use of 3D printing. These sculptures can only be viewed through the use of an electron microscope.

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Cassidy Nelson's comment, December 1, 2014 12:17 AM
That's amazing! Sometimes I wonder, if there is a god, what size are we compared to him? Are we so small that he too needs a microscope to see us? I'd imagine so.
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Bay Area photographer Cris Benton uses kite to capture bird's-eye view

Bay Area photographer Cris Benton uses kite to capture bird's-eye view | God's Eye View | Scoop.it
Bay Area photographer Cris Benton uses kite to capture bird's-eye view
Edgar's insight:

Today we get most of our aerial views from drones and other technologies. A photographer uses an old-school trick to obtain a "God's eye view." He simply takes a kite and a camera to achieve his aerial shots.

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Cassidy Nelson's comment, December 1, 2014 12:17 AM
Very interesting and cheap way to get a gods eye view. It's interesting how human beings aspire to seeing things through the eye of a bird or god. It is almost something to be coveted. I think that may be why drones have the amount of popularity with the public that they have.
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Drone reveals footage of a city decaying after Chernobyl explosion

Drone reveals footage of a city decaying after Chernobyl explosion | God's Eye View | Scoop.it
Devon-based documentary maker, Danny Cooke, has captured the city in decay by flying around the abandoned area using a DJI Phantom 2 quadcopter, a Canon 7D camera and a GoPro3+.
Edgar's insight:

Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident in Ukraine on April 26, 1986. 28 years later we get a view of it from a drone with an attached camera. We are allowed a view into a disaster area that will be unsafe to live in for another 20,000 years.

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The “Drone Guy” of Boyle Heights provides a bird’s-eye view of neighborhood landmarks | The Eastsider LA

The “Drone Guy” of Boyle Heights provides a bird’s-eye view of neighborhood landmarks | The Eastsider LA | God's Eye View | Scoop.it
The Eastsider publishes stories from Echo Park and the northeast corner of the City of Los Angeles and neighboring East Los Angeles.
Edgar's insight:

Architectural designer who goes by the name, "Drone Guy" uses a remote controlled drone with an attached GoPro to get a different view of historic buildings and local landmarks. As a hobby he posts videos on Youtube to allow people to get an aerial view of these buildings otherwise unobtainable from the ground. He is currently trying to get as much footage as possible before laws restricting citizens use of drones get passed in his city, Los Angeles.

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New Telescopic Contact Lens Magnifies Vision Three Times

Researchers led by Eric Tremblay from the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EDFL) in Switzerland and Joseph Ford from UC San Diego have
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Researchers in Switzerland working on contact lenses that magnify and zoom the users vision by 3X.

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Tiny satellites show us the Earth as it changes in near-real-time

Tiny satellites show us the Earth as it changes in near-real-time | God's Eye View | Scoop.it
Satellite imaging has revolutionized our knowledge of the Earth, with detailed images of nearly every street corner readily available online. But Planet Labs' Will Marshall says we can do better and go faster -- by getting smaller. He introduces his tiny satellites -- no bigger than 10 by 10 by 30 centimeters -- that, when launched in a cluster, provide high-res images of the entire planet, updated daily.
Edgar's insight:

A TED talk by Will Marshal a space scientist. He and his team at Planet Labs' have created miniature satellites.They plan to launch over a hundred of them so they can scan the earth every 24 hours. Thus, producing almost real time images of Earth.

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Eric Phillips's comment, December 1, 2014 12:48 AM
I for one like to look at GoogleEarth. I spent a lot of time preparing a camping trip to Colorado this past summer by looking at Google Earth. One main problem is that a lot of the imagery and landscape is old and outdated. This complex satellite system seems like it would be a great way to solve this problem and make GooglEarth and other satellite pictures better.
Cassidy Nelson's comment, December 1, 2014 12:58 AM
That's very interesting. I wonder how many satellites are already up in space as we speak. Does there come a point where there is any clogging because there are so many? I'm sure countries now have to actively be aware of where other people's satellites are. I'm sure adding 100 more might be kind of a nuisance.
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Layar, the pioneering augmented reality app, is now available for Google Glass

Layar, the pioneering augmented reality app, is now available for Google Glass | God's Eye View | Scoop.it
You want contextual overlays? Here are your contextual overlays.
Edgar's insight:

Layar is a augmented reality application. Combining the interaction of the virtual world and the real world. Now it is being added to Google Glass.

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NASA Encourages Asteroid Mining

NASA Encourages Asteroid Mining | God's Eye View | Scoop.it
Two private companies have received contracts from NASA to study asteroid redirection and will pursue their plans of asteroid mining. The companies are Deep Space Industries and Planetary Resources...
Edgar's insight:

Earth to the heavens. No longer bound to just mining on the ground. Spacecrafts will soon be designed to mine asteroids.

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Eric Phillips's comment, December 1, 2014 12:54 AM
Although I know that it would be expensive, I believe that it would be a good idea to do mining on asteroids. Since I am not a scientist, I am not sure how exactly this would work. I do think that there may be other minerals on asteroids that we do not have easy access to, so mining may be effective.
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Battlespace awareness through big data -- GCN

Battlespace awareness through big data -- GCN | God's Eye View | Scoop.it
The Navy and Esri are combining the massive amounts of data available from satellite and other remote-sensing platforms with the analytic tools of geospatial information systems.

Via Fernando Gil
Edgar's insight:

Currently "battlespace awareness" is highly human dependent. The Navy and Esri want to make it easier for Commanders to carry out their missions. To do this they want to combine huge data sets from satellites and other geospace analytic technologies. In order to create a system that uses that data to increase "battlespace awareness" and make it quicker and easier for Commanders to complete missions.

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Project: God's Eye View - YouTube

viewing molecules from god's eye view
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A project to view 3D images of molecules. Essentially using 3D imaging software to obtain a "God's eye view" of molecules that we are normally unable to view.

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GoPros Can Help Prevent the Next Ferguson

GoPros Can Help Prevent the Next Ferguson | God's Eye View | Scoop.it
There's one thing the tech world can help do in the wake of Ferguson: body cameras for every U.S. police officer - now.
Edgar's insight:

Something that citizens weren't able to have until now. The point of view from a police officer. The police body cameras are becoming more popular. In hope to prevent and clarify crimes committed by citizens or cops.

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Cassidy Nelson's comment, December 1, 2014 12:20 AM
I think that the GoPros would for sure make a difference. I think that cops should be monitored! Plus, it helps them out too. If a defendant claims something happened that really didn't happen, then the cop has proof of that. I don't see why this isn't already a major theme for police officers. Maybe it's because the system doesn't like to be monitored.. while they love to monitor us.
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Eagle-cam gives a bird’s-eye view over London

Eagle-cam gives a bird’s-eye view over London | God's Eye View | Scoop.it
Hold tight and get ready to experience a journey up the River Thames like no other courtesy of Sony’s bird cam and an eagle called Victor.
Edgar's insight:

Ever wonder what its like to be an eagle? A white-tailed eagle is used in a stunt to raise awareness of conservation and endangered species. Strapped with a Sony camera we are allowed a literal bird's-eye view in a small part of London.

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Google Launches "Street View" Of Great Barrier Reef | IFLScience

Google Launches "Street View" Of Great Barrier Reef | IFLScience | God's Eye View | Scoop.it
Dreaming of diving the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), but doubting you'll get there? Google has the answer, with a version of their popular "Street View" featuring more than 100,000 images of the enormous reef system. Cruising the reef like this is a beautiful way to spend your time and just as likely to stimulate an appetite for visiting. However, there is a serious intent behind the project, helping both scientists and the general public track damage to the reef from multiple sources.
Edgar's insight:

We are all aware of Google's "Street View" feature to get a 360 degree view of streets when traveling or getting directions. This feature will now be implemented into viewing of the Great Barrier Reef. This project is mainly to research the affect that global warming  has on the reef. Regardless, this gives anyone with an internet connection the ability to peer into the GBR and explore it from the comfort of their home.

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Cassidy Nelson's comment, November 28, 2014 1:05 AM
So much of the ocean is unexplored though. I love this idea. This will for sure be a costly endeavor on googles behalf. I wonder how much this will benefit science in the long run. I wonder how high quality the images will be. If they aren't well done, I'm not sure scientists could really use them. I also wonder if google intends to map the ENTIRE ocean or just what they can get to within reason.
Brad's comment, November 30, 2014 3:49 PM
I agree that science may not value this as much as the private community. What science may find valuable is also not completely stated in the article. Water levels and arial views from satellites have been used in ways I would have never imagined i the past.
Edgar's comment, November 30, 2014 10:27 PM
I'm waiting for Google Moon.