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Rescooped by Nell Haynes from Mobile media
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No Longer a Phone: The Cellphone as an Enabler of Augmented Reality

Today's navigation is different, with no paper map or compass. Instead we use a cellphone that has a built-in GPS. Such a cellphone is also equipped with an embedded camera that can read signs in various languages and barcodes that most humans cannot decipher. Combined, the GPS and the camera participate in the production and exercise of augmented reality, where reality is presented with layers of information which are accessible only through technological mediation. Currently such mediation is enabled by the cellphone, thereby providing novel dimensions to our experience of mobility. Consequently it produces innovative ways of navigation and a new sensation of reality.


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Linguistic and Material Intimacies of Mobile Phones – Report on a Wenner-Gren Funded Workshop

Linguistic and Material Intimacies of Mobile Phones – Report on a Wenner-Gren Funded Workshop | global social media | Scoop.it

In June 2013, our collaborative George Washington University/Smithsonian Institution team–Joshua A. Bell (NMNH Anthropology), Joel Kuipers (GWU Anthropology), Briel Kobak, Amanda Kemble, and Jacqueline Hazen–hosted a Wenner-Gren funded workshop, Linguistic and Material Intimacies of Mobile Phones, at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History. The workshop grew out of our anthropological project “Fixing Connections: The Art & Science of Repair,” which is funded by support a grant from the Smithsonian’s Consortium for World Cultures and Understanding the American Experience (www.si.edu/consortia). Since May 2012 we have been conducting ethnographic research in cell phone repair shops across the Washington, DC area to investigate the cultural intimacies associated with cell phones as well as their materiality. Repair shops are dynamic sites in which the social and linguistic components of technology – anxieties about damage and loss of information, connection and availability– articulate with the material realities of cell phones– the parts, supply chains, and labor that are required for repair (See Figures 1 and 2).

 


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Viral sensations of the 19th century

Viral sensations of the 19th century | global social media | Scoop.it
A new research project has found that content has been going viral since well before YouTube, cat videos and social media. Newspapers, not websites, were the medium of choice in the 19th century, but the subject matter has not changed much, writes Andrew Davies.
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The age of internet empires

The age of internet empires | global social media | Scoop.it
The internet is no longer the free, innovative market people still imagine: private giants like Google, Apple, Amazon and Facebook have taken over.

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Remediation of practices: How new media change the ways we see and do things in practical domains | Lanzara | First Monday

Remediation of practices: How new media change the ways we see and do things in practical domains
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Social Media Statistics 2013 you need to know - GeekShizzle

Social Media Statistics 2013 you need to know - GeekShizzle | global social media | Scoop.it
Social Media Statistics 2013 (Social Media Statistics 2013 you need to know http://t.co/y3lRAamwbq)
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Hey fans! Do you use any other social... - The Cardinal James Show | Facebook

Hey fans! Do you use any other social media other than Facebook? Twitter? Google+? Pinterest? Snapchat? MySpace (hehe)? Let us know! Facebook is moving... (Hey fans! Do you use any other social media other than Facebook?
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The Consequences of the Internet for Politics - Annual Review of Political Science, 15(1):35

The Consequences of the Internet for Politics - Annual Review of Political Science, 15(1):35 | global social media | Scoop.it

Political scientists are only now beginning to come to terms with the importance of the Internet to politics. The most promising way to study the Internet is to look at the role that causal mechanisms such as the lowering of transaction costs, homophilous sorting, and preference falsification play in intermediating between specific aspects of the Internet and political outcomes. This will allow scholars to disentangle the relevant causal relationships and contribute to important present debates over whether the Internet exacerbates polarization in the United States, and whether social media helped pave the way toward the Arab Spring uprisings of 2011. Over time, ever fewer political scientists are likely to study the Internet as such, as it becomes more and more a part of everyday political life. However, integrating the Internet's effects with present debates over politics, and taking proper advantage of the extraordinary data that it can provide, requires good causal arguments and attention to their underlying mechanisms.


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Teen Privacy Strategies in Networked Publics - Microsoft Research

Teen Privacy Strategies in Networked Publics - Microsoft Research | global social media | Scoop.it
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Teen Texting: The Ruin of Romance

Teen Texting: The Ruin of Romance | global social media | Scoop.it
Wake up, people. This needless incessant phone-to-phone contact is ruining relationships and not just romantic ones. Bottom line: Our children need a break.
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Tweeting Westgate

Tweeting Westgate | global social media | Scoop.it
[The following is an “invited post” by Dr. Sarah Hillewaert. Sarah is an Assistant Professor of Linguistic Anthropology at the University of Toronto. Her works focuses on shifting notio...
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HUMANITARIAN CAMPAIGNS IN SOCIAL MEDIA

HUMANITARIAN CAMPAIGNS IN SOCIAL MEDIA | global social media | Scoop.it

Madianou, M. (2013). HUMANITARIAN CAMPAIGNS IN SOCIAL MEDIA: Network architectures and polymedia events. Journalism Studies, 14(2), 249-266.

 

Social media and social networking sites (SNS) in particular have become popular in current humanitarian campaigns. This article assesses the optimism surrounding the opportunities that SNS communication offers for humanitarian action and for the cultivation of cosmopolitan sensibilities. In order to evaluate the mediation of suffering and humanitarian causes through social media, I argue that we need to understand the architectures of social media and SNS in addition to analysing the content of the campaigns drawing on the literature on humanitarian communication. Focusing on the analysis of two humanitarian campaigns through social media, the phenomenally popular and controversial Kony 2012 campaign and WaterForward, the article observes that the architectures of SNS orientate action at a communitarian level which heightens their post-humanitarian style. However, an emerging new genre of reporting and commenting which is termed “polymedia events” can potentially extend beyond the limitations of SNS communication by opening up the space for reflexivity and dialogical imagination.


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Book Review: The Great Indian Phone Book: How The Cheap Cell Phone Changes Business, Politics, and Daily Life

Book Review: The Great Indian Phone Book: How The Cheap Cell Phone Changes Business, Politics, and Daily Life | global social media | Scoop.it
The cheap mobile phone is arguably the most significant personal communications device in history. In India, where caste hierarchy has reinforced power for generations, the disruptive potential of ...

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Decline in social networking among UK 9-16 yrs.

Decline in social networking among UK 9-16 yrs. | global social media | Scoop.it
Convergent mobile media are increasingly popular among European children. However, up-to-date and comparable findings regarding the use of mobile media (especially smartphones and tablets),...

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John Postill's curator insight, October 21, 2013 5:50 AM

Sonia Livingstone ‏@Livingstone_S now

Decline in social networking among UK 9-16 yrs. From 67% in 2010 @EUKIDSONLINE to 58% in 2013 @NETCHILDRENGOMOBILE http://www.netchildrengomobile.eu

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Towards the study of actual (not potential) mobile-related changes in the developing world, by John Postill

Towards the study of actual (not potential) mobile-related changes in the developing world, by John Postill | global social media | Scoop.it

The study of mobile phones has boomed over the past ten years. Today it is doubtless one of the more vibrant research areas across the whole of media and communication studies. But this is also an undertheorised field, as a number of authors have pointed out. In this paper I heed the call for further theoretical work by addressing a blind spot in our field of vision, namely the elusive relationship between mobiles and sociocultural change. I suggest that we think about change not in the present continuous as we usually do (how things are chang-ing at present) but in the recent past, revisiting the empirical examples we have to date on actual changes that have already taken place, and then try and work out what part, if any, mobile phones played in those changes. I explore this approach through examples drawn from three strands of the bourgeoning mobile telephony literature, including some of my own primary research, namely political mobilisation, mobiles and markets, and everyday mobile sociality.


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The Simple Rules of Social Contagion

It is commonly believed that information spreads between individuals like a pathogen, with each exposure by an informed friend potentially resulting in a naive individual becoming infected. However, empirical studies of social media suggest that individual response to repeated exposure to information is significantly more complex than the prediction of the pathogen model. As a proxy for intervention experiments, we compare user responses to multiple exposures on two different social media sites, Twitter and Digg. We show that the position of the exposing messages on the user-interface strongly affects social contagion. Accounting for this visibility significantly simplifies the dynamics of social contagion. The likelihood an individual will spread information increases monotonically with exposure, while explicit feedback about how many friends have previously spread it increases the likelihood of a response. We apply our model to real-time forecasting of user behavior.


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Professional Identity: A Luxury Few Can Afford

Professional Identity: A Luxury Few Can Afford | global social media | Scoop.it
In today’s job market, you’re judged not by what you’ve accomplished, but by your ability to walk a path untouched by the incongruities of market forces.
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Reputation Management And Social Media | CustomerThink

Reputation Management And Social Media | CustomerThink | global social media | Scoop.it
Reputation Management And Social Media | CustomerThink http://t.co/RzzETLEPWs
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The Documented Life

The Documented Life | global social media | Scoop.it
We constantly interrupt our experiences to make a record of them. (An interesting opinion piece on how social media is shaping our social lives.
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New Media, New Civics?

New Media, New Civics? | global social media | Scoop.it
The Oxford Internet Institute was kind enough to invite me to give the inaugural lecture in their Bellwether Series.

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95 Percent of Languages Aren’t Going to Make It on the Internet

95 Percent of Languages Aren’t Going to Make It on the Internet | global social media | Scoop.it
Via this week’s Netizen report, an interesting new paper looks at the issue of “digital language death.” It's not news that we're currently in a period of mass linguistic extinction.
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How the hashtag revolutionizes the way we collectively contend for our interests

How the hashtag revolutionizes the way we collectively contend for our interests | global social media | Scoop.it

Political contention has entered a new age. Over the past three years unprecedented large-scale movements have challenged states across the globe, and social media has been an important component in their development and articulation. With the advent of social media sites, such as Facebook and Twitter, ordinary people have the technological ability to instantaneously transcend space, time and resources (Aouraugh and Alexander 2011; Castells 2012; Earl and Kimport 2009, 2011; Eltantawy, Nahed and Wiest 2011; Gerbaudo 2012; Hands 2011; Holmes 2012; Mason 2012). Are we currently living in a historical moment where a new repertoire of contention is emerging? If so, how is social media changing the way we collectively contest for our interests? The theoretical framework I propose in this paper advances and elaborates a social geographic approach in the framing of political contention that emphasizes the importance of the spatiality and temporality created by the hashtag (#) in the development and articulation of today's social movements. In addition to secondary sources about the protests in Brazil (#VemPraRua), I draw on participant observations to analyze a new modular form of protest I call the "hashtag movement." I claim that the hashtag (#) creates a new space/time (Massey 1992, 2007; Soja 1996) that fundamentally shifts the process of nation-ness (Anderson 2006) and marks a new phase in the mediazation of modern culture (Thompson 1991); two fundamental shifts that I argue are comparable to the structural and cultural shifts that formed the modern repertoire of contention (Anderson 2006; Della Porta and Diani 1999; McAdam 1999; McAdam, Tarrow and Tilly 2001; Sewell 1990, 1996; Swidler 1986; Tarrow 1993, 1994; Tilly 1986, 1995a, 1995b; Young 2002).


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John Postill's curator insight, December 1, 2013 8:01 PM

toret ‏@toret 30 Nov

Pueden apretar lo que quieran: la generación global de la #arabrevolution #15M #occupy #yosoy132 #direngezi #vemprarua vencerá! #globalrev

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Remediation of practices: How new media change the ways we see and do things in practical domains | Lanzara | First Monday

Remediation of practices: How new media change the ways we see and do things in practical domains
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The dumbest generation? No, Twitter is making kids smarter

The dumbest generation? No, Twitter is making kids smarter | global social media | Scoop.it
A big change was found in how students were writing – and it was a positive shift
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literacy and digital media

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