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TimeMaps: Global

TimeMaps: Global | Global History Resources | Scoop.it
History, map and timeline of the World, in 3500 BC the civilization of ancient Mesopotamia has emerged along with another in the Nile Valley
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Reformation and Exploration - MrBettsWorldReview

In this episode, Europe divides and conquers! Find out different sects broke off for religious and political reasons and what happens when the "Old World" me...
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Africa and Islamic Expansion - MrBettsWorldReview

We highlight African history from the dawn of humanity to West African trade kingdoms and Islamic culture enters a Golden Age while Europe enters its Dark Ag...
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Classical Civilizations - MrBettsWorldReview

China, India, Greece, and Rome. How did their "classical" periods influence the world of today? Part 3 of this 10-part series takes a look at four of the mos...
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Watch The World Grow Older In 4 GIFs

Watch The World Grow Older In 4 GIFs | Global History Resources | Scoop.it
Some countries are getting old. Others are staying young — and getting much bigger.

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CHS AP Human Geography / Beth Gehle & Amy Rossello's curator insight, December 14, 2013 11:00 AM

A cool look at the DTM and population pyramids

RobersonWG's curator insight, December 27, 2013 10:52 PM

Read the article and review the GIF image data.  Think of these as non-gender specific population pyramids.  How would you explain the growth in our older population age ranges 50+?  Why such a growth in older people and a decline in younger people?

Noah Duncan's curator insight, January 13, 2014 5:44 PM

There are many countries that are growing old. The United States of America isn't as much as Japan. Japan must have a low fertility rate because there are more elders. There are some countries that are not getting older Like Nigeria. Nigeria has a very high fertility rate, and children are a huge share of the people in those countries.

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Muslims masquerade as Hindus for India jobs

Muslims masquerade as Hindus for India jobs | Global History Resources | Scoop.it
Facing religious discrimination in the Hindu-dominated job market, many are forced to assume fake identities.

Via Seth Dixon
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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:11 PM

In the marketplace, one of a different religion has to mask her true identity to be able to sell the food there. Not only is this woman facing pure discrimination she is facing it because of what she believes in. Nothing is more horrible than being stripped away from something you believe in. In order for her to sell food in this marketplace, she must do so to survive.

Jackson and Marduk's curator insight, October 27, 2014 4:03 PM

Religion: The main religion in India is Hindu. Since this is so widely practiced in India, other religions are discriminated. This article explains how some people have to act like they practice Hindu just to get a job.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 2, 2015 3:39 PM

Having to masquerade as a different religion in order to get a job is not a concept that most Americans are familiar with, as we live in a highly secular society.  India, which too is supposed to be a secular society, is failing at this as the article shows.  Muslim women have to pretend to be Hindus in order to get a job, as many Hindus (who are dominant in India) will refuse to higher people who follow Islam.  There are historical reasons for this, as the Hindus of the country were dominated by the Muslims for years under the Mughal Empire.  However, it is a sad fact that the secular country of India which is striving towards becoming a superpower would treat citizens of a different faith in such a poor manner.  This is very interesting for Americans to think about, and it even parallels our history.  In the 19th Century and even the earlier 20th century we were much more aware of religions and ethnicity and these groups stuck together, however by the time of the 1960s and 70s this landscape was rapidly disappearing.  India should itself move on from this practice, yet I believe it will be difficult given the nature of the situation, and the baggage carried by the groups.

 

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Is the World Empty? Or Overcrowded? It's Both

Is the World Empty? Or Overcrowded? It's Both | Global History Resources | Scoop.it

"For city dwellers, it may seem like the world is packed full with people. But not everywhere is so densely populated; in fact, many places in the world are seemingly void of life.There are over 7 billion people on the planet, a massive number that paints an image of human life sprawling densely over the planet...humans are unevenly distributed across the planet, leaving some areas that are densely populated and others that are largely void of life."


Via Seth Dixon
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RobersonWG's curator insight, December 27, 2013 10:48 PM

As you review the resource map noting the locations of the emptiest and most crowded places on Earth, take note on where these places are located.  What do you see?  Why do you think they are crowded or uninhabitable?  What are your thoughts?  What amazed you?

Samantha Tovias's curator insight, January 13, 2014 2:39 AM

What this article states is that in some places of the world it's crowded with a lot of people and there's not much space. People struggle to find places to live without being really close to ones neighbor. They also have to struggle over  job opportunities. Due to this they struggle with poverty and the places they are at aren't so clean. This is because people make a lot of trash and where there's many people there is a lot of trash. Therefore it's not so sanitary and they have to deal with lack of space and sanitation.

 

On the other hand, in some places of the world, there is much space to be inhabited by humans. But it's basically free land because no one lives there and there's no building occupying it. But this land could be used for many things such as building neighbor hoods, buildings, and business. Sometimes it's good to have that land free from everything because that way when there's really a reason to use it we can just go back to it with no worrys. Just as long as we don't use up too much land it should be fine. We also need to know how to control how much nature we use up. Because its also not healthy to have a lot of pollution with no trees to cleanse our oxygen. That's a hazardous precaution us humans should take.

Christian Madison's curator insight, January 13, 2014 7:18 PM

Well some places, such as deserts, are really hot, dry, barren and devoid of life; mostly because it's impossible to build anything on such soft ground. While places such as Texas has really dry and hard ground perfect for building foundations.  Then there's the amount of resources in that area, I.e. Water, food, tree, etc.,  and many other factors that contradict if it's inhabitable.

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All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella

All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella | Global History Resources | Scoop.it
Turkish hazelnuts, Malaysian palm oil, Nigerian cocoa, Brazilian sugar, French vanilla...

 

Some 250,000 tons of Nutella are now sold across 75 countries around the world every year, according to the OECD. Nutella is a perfect example of what globalization has meant for popular foodstuffs: Not only is it sold everywhere, but its ingredients are sourced from all over the place too.


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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, January 28, 2014 1:26 PM

Some things that we take for granted are and come from all over the world. As you said in last class just because something says that it is not made in China doesnt mean that their arent any resources that the company used to creat the item that didn't come from China or any other power house place. In this case the Palm Oil comesd from Malaysia, Hazelnut comes from Turkey, Cocoa from Nigeria, Vainilla from Brazil and, Vainilla and Sugar from France.

Mrs Parkinson's curator insight, February 12, 2014 3:48 PM

GCSE Globalisation info - great case study

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:55 AM

I was surprised to see how many countries contribute to s single jar of nutella. I have always assumed it came straight from Italy just because it is an Italian commodity. It is a positive thing to see because you look at the commerce and trade that is generated throughout the world through this one brand alone

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Rare snow storm hits Middle East

Rare snow storm hits Middle East | Global History Resources | Scoop.it
A rare snow storm hit the Middle East last week, producing record snows and extreme conditions for Syrian refugees.

Via Seth Dixon
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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:16 PM

I live in New England, so there isn't much to say about an oddball snowstorm. Yes, its weird that it happened randomly in Syria but the fact is that mother nature can surprise us more often than not.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 14, 2014 12:22 PM

Many people here in the United States have this mental image of the Middle East being a massive desert with little precipitation and incredibly hot temperatures. The Middle East actually contains diverse landscapes and to an extent, some differing climates, and while snow is incredibly rare in some parts, it is not unheard of. In this instance, the weather anomaly affected numerous Syrian refugees who were unprepared for such an event. 

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 26, 2015 2:53 PM

Those who resist climate change can only blatantly ignore the facts for so long. "It snowed?! So what?! Doesn't that prove global warming isn't real?!" No. Climate change is irrefutable, evidenced by thousands of bits of data collected across the globe, and irregular weather patterns have plagued vast areas the past decade. Snow in the Middle East? 12-20 inches in Jerusalem? That is extremely alarming- the picture of the camel resting in a field as snow continued to fall around him highlights how ludicrous and odd these weather patterns really are, and yet people continue to deny the severity of the issue, or even the existence of an issue concerning the world's climate. I understand that significant amounts of money are invested in maintaining the status quo and continuing to utilize fossil fuels, but we cannot all breathe money; we need the planet for us to live. Serious efforts must be made by all nations to push through the necessary reforms to stop us from making the problem any worse. I would not be surprised to hear of yet more odd weather patterns in the upcoming winter, and I will not be surprised to still see people ignoring the problem. I hope I'm wrong, though.

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Climate Change at it's most basic

http://www.HowGlobalWarmingWorks.org University of California

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Expert's comment, December 18, 2013 7:27 PM
hmm.
imran bharti's curator insight, December 18, 2013 11:46 PM

good

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 9:17 AM

This video shoes us how climate change works in the most basic understanding. The video shows how global warming works and what exactly it does. It also shows how the climate changes effect the earth and the importance of understanding the  climate.

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Welcome to 'Geography Education'

Welcome to 'Geography Education' | Global History Resources | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/ (organized by the APHG curriculum).  Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab above.


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Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 18, 2014 2:10 PM

Geography and current events

Olivier Tabary's curator insight, November 28, 2014 12:06 PM

Many interesting tools to practice and to discover

Jamie Mitchell's curator insight, March 8, 2016 1:04 AM

Amazing resources about places and topics in Geography

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OneWorld Now! | Developing the next generation of global leaders.

OneWorld Now! | Developing the next generation of global leaders. | Global History Resources | Scoop.it
OneWorld Now! is a two-year global leadership program for high school sophomores and juniors that offers opportunities in language, leadership, and study abroad.

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Global State of Agriculture

Global State of Agriculture | Global History Resources | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon, Sharolyn S. Griffith
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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 1, 2014 10:30 AM

Unit V, main idea of the unit!

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 15, 2014 10:00 AM

Unit 5

Mrs. B's curator insight, March 23, 2016 6:02 AM

This conveys some important realities about the demographic necessities of agriculture, the economic impact and the cultural differences in agricultural production. As with all long infographics on this site, you can "scroll down" on the image by putting the cursor in the top right-hand corner of the image and sliding on the translucent bar. 


Tags: agriculture, infographic, unit 5 agriculture.

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Intellectual Revolutions and Absolutism - MrBettsWorldReview

We end our series as man learns he is not the center of the universe, the sun may in fact be a French monarch, and we see from where the American founding fa...
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The Middle Ages and Renaissance - MrBettsWorldReview

In today's review, Mr. Betts gets all medieval on your brain. We'll take a look at the conditions and crises of the Middle Ages as well as taking in some cul...
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Legal Systems and the Byzantine Empire - MrBettsWorldReview

"The Wire" teaches us morality, Judge Dredd defines the law, and the glory of Rome continues for another thousand years. We've reached the halfway point of o...
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The Container that Moves the Global Economy

The Container that Moves the Global Economy | Global History Resources | Scoop.it
The unsung hero of the global economy: the shipping container.

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 5, 2014 11:50 PM

We discussed how the container has transformed the global economy. These videos show how a simple tee shirt is made from cotton in the US, labor in Columbia, Indonesia, and Bangladesh. In the 1950s Malcolm McLean developed the first shipping container industry and transformed the global economy. Due to the fact that these containers can hold some many items, shipping goods from place to place makes manufacturing a global process. Economic geographies were completely revamped by the innovation of McLean, now a making a tee shirt connects the economies of many nations. A piece of clothing being sold in the United States now is connected to labor across the globe. 

Vicki Bedingfield's curator insight, November 5, 2015 4:54 PM

Tracking the commodity of the T-shirt from cotton to retail.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:18 AM


NPR's Planet Money has produced an 8-part series following the commodity chain of the T-Shirt.  This series explores cotton production, textile mills, sweatshops, outsourcing and in this podcast, the transportation infrastructure that moves goods globally.  This podcast touches on the same topic as one of my favorite TED talks, how containerization enabled globalization.   

 

Tags:  transportation, industry, economic, globalization, technology, podcast.


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Missing Girls...

"In India, China and many other parts of the world today, girls are killed, aborted and abandoned simply because they are girls. The United Nations estimates as many as 200 million girls are missing in the world today because of this so-called 'gendercide' or femicide."


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Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, December 2, 2014 9:52 PM

Unit 3 Cultural Processes and Patterns

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, December 15, 2014 3:45 PM

This femicide is extremely disappointing.  Genocide is expected in third world, war torn countries.  The fact that it's 2014 and female babies are murdered for being girls, and parents are scared for their  children's lives, show how much power the government has over the people's lives. It is sad to think the government has the power to dictate how many children families can have and what gender.  On the flip side, these are countries that are extremely overpopulated.  The one child policy in China is what China is currently using (along with this femicide) as population control.  This is an important issue because there needs to be some sort of population control, but to what extent? This is taking away someone's basic human right - to procreate. Parents do not have control over what gender they produce and if they produce a female, their child may be taken and murdered from them. The state takes away what you created, your offspring and there is nothing they can do about it. 

Taylor Doonan's curator insight, March 30, 5:24 PM
This video addresses the problems with having a girl versus having a boy baby. It talks about families killing babies if they are girls, aborting them, all so they can go on to have a son. According to the video 200 million girls are missing throughout the world. Many of these missing girls are daughters that were aborted or killed so their families could go onto have a son. 
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Safe drinking water disappearing fast in Bangladesh

Safe drinking water disappearing fast in Bangladesh | Global History Resources | Scoop.it
Extreme weather increases salinity of water in coastal areas while excessive demand in Dhaka leaves dwindling supply

Via Seth Dixon
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Chris Costa's curator insight, November 9, 2015 2:39 PM

For over 20% of the population, finding safe drinking water in Bangladesh is a daily struggle that is only expected to worsen in the coming decades.These Bangladeshis live in "hard-to-reach" areas of the nation, along the swampy marshlands of the inlands and coastal outlets, where access by roads is severely restricted. This makes it difficult to transport the necessary aid to these regions, placing them disproportionately at the peril of natural disasters and other such catastrophes. The increasing salinity of the water in these areas- the result of acid rain and other man-made climate changes- has made it extremely difficult for the people of these regions to find the drinking water necessary to replenish their exploding population. With the effects of climate change only worsening, the plight of these people can be expected to get worse and worse. Millions of people face increasing health risks and even death as we move forward into the 21st century; I hope that the powers that be are able to find a solution to help these people receive the aid they so desperately need. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 10, 2015 6:34 AM

Water is essential to human survival. Contaminated water is a detriment to human survival. Extreme weather has caused a dwindling of the safe drinking water supply in Bangladesh. The consequences of this dwindling are catastrophic.  A lack of safe drinking water will inevitably lead to the demise of many people. Warfare is often a consequence of a lack of precious resources. No resource in the world is more precious than water. This issue was caused by extreme weather increasing the salinity of water in the costal areas. Physical geography plays a huge role in the availability of safe drinking water. Areas more prone to extreme weather are far more likely to experience these same kinds of issues. Unfortunately, Bangladesh in one of those areas that is effected by this type of scenario.  

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:04 AM

Access to safe drinking water is a physical and human geography issue because it all depends on location. For example, in Dhaka, a heavily populated area, fresh water is limited. Besides waters/rivers in Dhaka being polluted, this is a poverty filled area and government funds can only get so much for people. Dhaka is a poor, urban, and populated community.

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Ukraine: To Face Europe or Russia?

Ukraine: To Face Europe or Russia? | Global History Resources | Scoop.it

"This map illustrates the country's deep division – and why the protests might not be what you think. Ukraine has been wracked by protests for two-plus weeks over President Viktor Yanukovych's decision to reject a deal for closer integration with the European Union. Russian President Vladimir Putin had been pressuring Yanukovych to quit the EU deal and join with a Moscow-led trade union of former Soviet states instead. Will Ukraine's future be with Russia or with Europe?"


Via Seth Dixon
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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 15, 2014 2:16 PM

The Ukraine is divided along Ethno-linguitic lines. Even within the borders of Ukraine there are contrast in the characteristics of local communities. Some identify with Russia, others with Ukraine. The borders of Ukraine are likely to change because there are such differences between its citizens.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:08 PM

Ukraine has been wracked by protests for two-plus weeks over President Viktor Yanukovych's decision to reject a deal for closer integration with the European Union. Thousands of protesters in the capital city of Kiev are calling for Yanukovych to step down. This is a potentially big moment for Ukraine, as well as for Europe: Russian President Vladimir Putin had been pressuring Yanukovych to quit the EU deal and join with a Moscow-led trade union of former Soviet states instead. Will Ukraine's future be with Russia or with Europe? What's happening in Ukraine is complicated and driven by many factors: the country's history as an unhappy component of the Soviet Union, its deep economic woes, a sense of cultural fondness for the West, wide discontent with government corruption, two decades of divided politics and a sense that Yanukovych caved to Putin.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 8, 2015 10:23 AM

It is unfortunate to see this happening.  Ukrainians want to be connected to Europe not Russia.  The divide between the people ad the President is quite large.  This makes me wonder if Putin is promising Yanukovych with a monetary bribe.  Or if Putin is threatening Yanukovych.  

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Concentrations of Wealth and Poverty

Concentrations of Wealth and Poverty | Global History Resources | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, December 18, 2013 9:59 AM

See where the wealth and poverty are in America using this great map.

Chandrima Roy's curator insight, January 9, 2014 10:44 PM

wonderful

 

Ishwer Singh's curator insight, January 20, 2014 6:56 AM

This picture shows the cocentrations of poverty and affluence.  The areas hilighted in yellow show the areas which are wealthy and the dark blue showing the poor. This coincides with the amout of pay and the education levels in these countries. Areas such as Boston, New York and Washington show high cocentrations of affluence. These areas also have much higher education systems and more well -paid jobs. Countries which are highlighted in dark blue are countries with lesser education and lesser paid jobs. This shows the  extent at which poverty can affect a country.

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South Sudan factional fighting leaves hundreds feared dead

South Sudan factional fighting leaves hundreds feared dead | Global History Resources | Scoop.it

"Two days of street battles between rival factions in South Sudan's army left parts of the capital in ruins and prompted fears of a bloodbath in the world's youngest country.

UN officials in New York said they had received reports from local sources indicating that between 400 and 500 people had been killed and up to 800 wounded. More than 16,000 people were seeking refuge at UN facilities. What began on Sunday night as an alleged coup attempt now threatens to widen deep ethnic divisions in a country awash with weapons and still recovering from a devastating war that led to its secession from the north in 2011."


Via Seth Dixon
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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 24, 2014 9:51 PM

The newest nation in the world still faces hardships today in 2014. In 2013 the country was almost involved with a civil war between the government and rebel forces. One of the reasons for violence occurring was some people who were supportive of the vice president felt the president was acting like a dictator. However, in 2014 a cease-fire was signed between the government and rebel forces, but violence still occurs between those groups of people and over natural resources such as oil.

It is very difficult for the newest country in the world to be successful, as it is politically unstable. 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 4, 2014 2:37 PM

Wow they just got their own country and now they are fighting amongst themselves. The government said it was a misunderstanding. Sad that 500 people died due to a misunderstanding.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 1, 2014 10:59 PM

Two and a half years as a country and they are already fighting?  With all the instability already in Sudan before South Sudan was created it doesn't help that there are differences between the people of South Sudan to add to the mix.  The people don't even trust their own government as they are flocking in masses to the UN refugee centers instead of listening to the government when they have been assured security.  With any hope South Sudan can get it together, stop killing their own people, and become an example for other countries around them to follow.

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This Map Shows Why The Battle For 'Ukraine's Soul' Is So Pivotal

This Map Shows Why The Battle For 'Ukraine's Soul' Is So Pivotal | Global History Resources | Scoop.it
The tug-of-war for Ukraine.

Via Seth Dixon
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Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 2014 11:28 AM

Besides the very intense cultural and political split that exists in Ukraine and the conflict as a whole, one of the key factors in this situation is gas.  This infographic shows that both Ukraine and the EU gets their gas from Russia, and Ukraine is the area which the gas lines flow through.  As soon as many people in Ukraine showed interest in joining the EU, Russia reminded Ukrainians and the world of this fact

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 20, 2015 2:51 PM

The tug-of-war over Ukraine's gas lines not only creates political and cultural divides but also a lot of tension. Ukraine has power in its gas lines because it has a resource that is valuable and others need.

tyrone perry's curator insight, April 9, 7:18 PM
The fight for Ukrainian land stems from Russian gas lines going thru Ukraine.  But Ukraine wants to be part of the EU to become stronger financially.  Russia already slashes gas prices to Ukraine so it seems they just want complete control for more profit and more geographic location. 
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Santas Around the World

Santas Around the World | Global History Resources | Scoop.it
This story map was created with the Esri Map Tour application in ArcGIS Online.

Via Seth Dixon
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Vivica Juarez's comment, January 13, 2014 8:10 PM
This was definitely an interesting reading. I believe @Spencer Levesque had a very good point. They all have similar features, but are different in little ways. And who would of thought someone came on New Years too?
Kate Loy's curator insight, January 13, 2014 10:23 PM

I find it very interesting on how other countries precieve Santa Claus. The history on him, what he looks like, how he gets around, and what they call him. Each country perceives him differently, depending on their culture and history. His clothes, age, language, and personality.

Kate Loy's curator insight, January 13, 2014 10:28 PM

I find it very interesting on how other countries perceive Santa Claus. The history on him, what he looks like, how he gets around, and what they call him. Each country precieves him differently, depending on their culture and history. His clothes, age, language, and personality.

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Geography game: how well do you know the world?

Geography game: how well do you know the world? | Global History Resources | Scoop.it
Play the Global development game: identify the world's countries and territories, rank them according to GDP then fingers at the ready for the picture round

Via Sharolyn S. Griffith
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