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Most Tibetans Genetically Adapted To The High Life

Most Tibetans Genetically Adapted To The High Life | Global Education | Scoop.it
Ninety percent of Tibetans share a genetic mutation that prevents their blood from becoming dangerously clogged with red blood cells at high altitudes—a response that can be deadly for non-native mountaineers. Karen Hopkin reports.

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Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 7, 2015 9:27 PM

The fact that the people in Tibet have become environmentally and culturally adapted to the land shows just how serious the whole mutation is. Many people who would travel to such high heights would not be able to respond in the same was as the Tibetans. This mutation prevents blood from becoming severely clogged and could injure those who are not mountaineers in the area. This mutation started about 8,000 years ago which is interesting because who was the first person to have this gene mutation and what caused the mutation? Tibetan people have a rare gene sequence that shows just how special they are to their land and I find it quite interesting because not everyone would be able to live with it? What would happen if the people of Tibet happen to move someone outside of Tibet, would their blood start to clog? 

90% of people in Tibet have this gene sequence and shows how the gene adaptation will change due to levels of height, having a play on words because the Tibetan people are always at very high levels. Thin air and clogged blood are not a good combination.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, April 15, 2015 9:45 AM

This is extremely interesting.  When I think of the mutated gene that most Tibetans have I think of evolution happening right in front of our eyes.  Most lowland humans would not be able to survive at the Tibetan level of living, which goes to show you that over time the people who live in this area were naturally selected due to the special genes of their ancestors who survived while others without the gene died off.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 7, 2015 1:01 PM

The Tibetans are very amazing in the ways to adapting to high altitudes. Being 15,000 ft in elevation with 40% less oxygen than at sea level is very impressive. Many people like myself would find it difficult breathing in this conditions , but the Tibetans developed a mutation that lead them to not having their red blood cells clogged at this elevation. A perfect example of human adapting to their surrounding environment.

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Common Core Social Studies Companion

A comprehensive collection of specific links and multimedia resources for middle school common core social studies curriculum.
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Lesson Plan: World War II

Lesson Plan: World War II | Global Education | Scoop.it
The world's most popular and easy to use comic and storyboard creator for education.
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Memory Of The Camps | FRONTLINE | PBS

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Bloom's Taxonomy for The Web (Visual) - Educators Technology

Bloom's Taxonomy for The Web (Visual) - Educators Technology | Global Education | Scoop.it
For those of you who haven’t seen it yet,here is a handy visual featuring what we think are some of the best educational web tools for Bloom’ taxonomy. For each of Bloom’s thinking levels we came up with a number of suggested tools that go with it. We have been very selective concerning the choices included and because of space constraints we  excluded several other tools that worth the mention here. Also, the visual is not hyperlinked, check out the chart at the bottom of the page for links of the featured tools. For an iPad version of this graphic, click here.

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Memory Of The Camps | FRONTLINE | PBS

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look over for wwi info
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Memory Of The Camps | FRONTLINE | PBS

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Here Are 31 Haunted Places You Can Explore With Google Maps -

Here Are 31 Haunted Places You Can Explore With Google Maps - | Global Education | Scoop.it
Have you ever wanted to play paranormal investigator?

Would you like to explore America’s most frightening locations, both near and far?

Maybe you’re looking for inspiration for some creepy curricula based around historical fact-finding?

Have no fear, Google’s got your back.

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TeachersFirst: Using Art to Define the Renaissance

TeachersFirst: Using Art to Define the Renaissance | Global Education | Scoop.it
This unit will take students through a process in which they will not only experience masterpieces from the Renaissance, but will also learn to analyze art, draw conclusions, and, at the advanced level, apply lessons from the art to their own lives. In doing so, students will gain an understanding of the characteristics that define the Renaissance.
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Transnationalizing Faith: Following Islam through German History, 1770-1918. | University of Oxford

Transnationalizing Faith: Following Islam through German History, 1770-1918. | University of Oxford | Global Education | Scoop.it
Transnationalizing Faith: Following Islam through German History, 1770-1918. The Relevance for Contemporary Britain. Hosted by the Ertegun Scholarship Pro
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The Red Atlas

The Red Atlas | Global Education | Scoop.it
The book The Red Atlas: How the Soviet Union Secretly Mapped the World, John Davies and Alexander J. Kent is published by University of Chicago Press.
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The American Dream

The American Dream | Global Education | Scoop.it
America. Land of the free. Home of the brave… Trace 60 years of a superpower in this major new exhibition.
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Interactive Gnomonic Map

Interactive Gnomonic Map | Global Education | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 30, 2015 9:24 AM

As stated on USGS map projections page: "[Gnomonic maps are] used by some navigators to find the shortest path between two points.  Any straight line drawn on the map is on a great circle, but directions are true only from center point of projection."  This interactive is a very fun way  to visualize this and to understand distortion.

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Outsiders often using the Amish name for marketing

Outsiders often using the Amish name for marketing | Global Education | Scoop.it

"In and around Amish country, it's easy to find countless stores and websites advertising Amish quilts, Amish candy and Amish crafts. But though Mr. Zook is Amish, it would be impossible to tell from the name of his Evansburg farm, Maple Run, or his products, whose homemade labels make no mention of their maker's religion.  In fact, it's a good bet that if the word 'Amish' appears on a store or a product, the Amish themselves didn't put it there. Experts and Amish alike say that the name, used as a marketing tool, is almost exclusively the domain of the non-Amish."


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John Puchein's curator insight, November 6, 2015 7:37 AM

Great example of folk culture and cultural commodification. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 10:03 AM

unit 3

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 10:05 AM

unit 3

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Life is Beautiful: Teaching the Holocaust through Film with Complementary Texts

Life is Beautiful: Teaching the Holocaust through Film with Complementary Texts | Global Education | Scoop.it
After students have read a book about the Holocaust, such as The Diary of Anne Frank or Night by Elie Wiesel, students will view Life is Beautiful and complete discussion questions to challenge their ability to analyze literature using film.

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Bloom's Taxonomy for The Web (Visual) - Educators Technology

Bloom's Taxonomy for The Web (Visual) - Educators Technology | Global Education | Scoop.it
For those of you who haven’t seen it yet,here is a handy visual featuring what we think are some of the best educational web tools for Bloom’ taxonomy. For each of Bloom’s thinking levels we came up with a number of suggested tools that go with it. We have been very selective concerning the choices included and because of space constraints we  excluded several other tools that worth the mention here. Also, the visual is not hyperlinked, check out the chart at the bottom of the page for links of the featured tools. For an iPad version of this graphic, click here.

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StoriumEdu

StoriumEdu | Global Education | Scoop.it
Storium helps students develop their skills as writers and storytellers. In beta testing now!

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Nik Peachey's curator insight, November 25, 2017 2:12 AM

This looks worth registering with.

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What Are the Four Effects of the Magellan Voyage? | Synonym

What Are the Four Effects of the Magellan Voyage? | Synonym | Global Education | Scoop.it
Ferdinand Magellan is often credited as the first person to circumnavigate the globe. This is partially true. Although Magellan himself would not survive the entire voyage, his expedition complete
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Memory Of The Camps | FRONTLINE | PBS

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Newsela | FBI says hate crime rate climbs as Jews, Muslims, LGBTs mostly targeted

Newsela | FBI says hate crime rate climbs as Jews, Muslims, LGBTs mostly targeted | Global Education | Scoop.it
Disturbing news on hate crimes
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Religion articles for GLobal
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Metacognition: Nurturing Self-Awareness in the Classroom

Metacognition: Nurturing Self-Awareness in the Classroom | Global Education | Scoop.it
When students practice metacognition, the act of thinking about their thinking helps them make greater sense of their life experiences and start achieving at higher levels.
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Renaissance Art: History, Characteristics

Renaissance Art: History, Characteristics | Global Education | Scoop.it
Italian Renaissance Art (1400-1600): Evolution of Visual Arts in Florence, Rome, Venice
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Transnationalizing Faith: Following Islam through German History, 1770-1918. The Relevance for Contemporary Britain.

Transnationalizing Faith: Following Islam through German History, 1770-1918. The Relevance for Contemporary Britain. | Global Education | Scoop.it
Exhibition at Ertegun House, University of Oxford
Sat May 13 - Sun May 14, 2017

Opening Hours:

Sat & Sun, 10am – 4pm
Sat, 11am, Introductory Talk by Dr James Hodkinson, University of Warwick

Admission free and open to all.

For further information: http://ertegun.ox.ac.uk/news-events/transnationalizing-faith-following-islam-through-german-history-1770-1918-relevance

Please register for your free ticket here: http://www.oxforduniversitystores.co.uk/product-catalogue/humanities-division/humanities-division-ertegun-house/transnationalizing-faith-following-islam-through-german-history-17701918

About the exhibition:
Hosted by the Ertegun Scholarship Programme, this exhibition invites you to look at Islam through the eyes of the German-speaking world. It takes you on a journey through the first phase of modern German history, starting in around 1770 and moving through to the end of the First World War in 1918. During that time Germany went from being an idealistic notion to a nation state – indeed it became an Empire with colonial interests in Africa and Asia. Not surprisingly, the German vision of the Islamic world changed greatly, and was shaped by advances in learning, the increased movement of people and objects, and shifts in political, intellectual and cultural history. Germany’s evolving political and cultural relationship with the great Islamic empire of the Ottoman Turks played a central role throughout this period.

The exhibition also considers the position of Islam in German-speaking Austria, which had borne the brunt of Ottoman aggression since the 16th century: later, though, Austria became a multicultural Empire, fused with Hungary and other states, and was also home to European Muslim citizens.

Throughout you will find images and short texts in which contrasting ideas and images of Islam from the German-speaking lands are presented. The banners are arranged in chronological order and a timeline will help you place people and events. Later in the exhibition, several banners offer a brief insight into the position of Islam in Germany today. The exhibition returns to a series of key ideas that help you to consider critically how Islam and Muslims are represented in the material. You will also be prompted to reflect on how these ideas relate to your own experiences, understanding and perception of Islam and Muslims in the UK today. The exhibition is the product of original academic research though is pitched in such a way that it will speak to interested, non-academic visitors. Undegraduate students and ‘A' Level students of MFL, Religious Studies and History will also find the material accessible. Workbooks are available for school groups on request.

The exhibition is touring in support of the ‘Transnationalizing Faith’ project run by Dr. James Hodkinson at the University of Warwick: https//warwick.ac.uk/transnationalizingfaith

Biography:
Dr James Hodkinson is Associate Professor in German in the School of Modern Languages and Cultures, University of Warwick and is a specialist in eighteenth and nineteenth-century German-language culture. His research explores Islam through German history and culture. The Transnationalizing Faith project is a multi-dimensional outreach project, which takes key aspects of James’ research into Islam in German history and culture (1770-1918) and finds multiple pathways along which to engage with this material meaningfully to varying audiences.

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BFI Mediatheques

BFI Mediatheques | Global Education | Scoop.it
At BFI Mediatheques you can watch over 2,500 complete films and TV programmes from the BFI National Archive free of charge.
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Why Mercator for the Web? Isn’t the Mercator bad?

Why Mercator for the Web? Isn’t the Mercator bad? | Global Education | Scoop.it

"As you may know, Google Maps uses the Mercator projection. So do other Web mapping services, such as Bing Maps and MapQuest. Over the years I’ve encountered antipathy toward the use of the Web Mercator from map projection people. I know of two distinct schools of opposition. One school, consisting of cartographic folks and map aficionados, thinks the Mercator projection is 'bad': The projection misrepresents relative sizes across the globe and cannot even show the poles, they are so inflated. The other school, consisting of geodesy folks, thinks mapping services have corrupted the Mercator projection, whether by using the wrong formulæ for it or by using the wrong coordinate system for it."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 30, 2015 8:41 AM

In this article you will find a thoughtful discussion of the reasons why the Mercator projection is disliked by many, but still so prevalent.  In ArcGIS online, you can Search For Groups and then enter Projected Basemaps to see many map projections on that platform. For more resources on understanding map projections, click here


Tags: mapping, visualization, map projections, cartography, perspective, unit 1 Geoprinciples.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, October 7, 2015 7:42 AM

Mercaror ArcGis

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Medicated Pain Relief Cream - Amish Origins

Medicated Pain Relief Cream - Amish Origins | Global Education | Scoop.it
Amish Origins medicated pain relief products work great for arthritis, joints, sore muscles, burns, itch and more. Creams, Spray and Greaseless salve.
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