Global Citizenship and Children's Rights
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Global Citizenship and Children's Rights
SSS3.7 Describes how Australian people, systems and communities are globally interconnected and recognises global responsibilities: International human rights agreements and organisations (Convention on the Rights of the Child)
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Stolen Generations Fact Sheet

Rebecca Borland's insight:

This website contains a fact sheet on the forced removal and assimilation of Aboriginal children into the Welfare system of Australia. It outlines the procedures, the devastating initial and continued effects of the removal, and the government amendments and apologies that have been made in recent years. It shows the abuse of power against Aboriginal children that occurred and how it continues to disadvantage them today.

 

Teaching idea: Read the fact sheet with the class and ask them questions throughout the text to ensure their engagement and understanding. Ask the students whether they think it was right that these children were taken from their parents. Was it the right thing to do for them? Do you think they were happier before and after? Did they consider the children's point of view? Was it in their best interests to be taken away? Discuss the child and human rights violations that occurred during these events, and the fact that things like this are still happening in other countries. Students then create a piece of artwork – collage, painting, or sculpture – to portray how a child who has been taken from their family might feel. Brainstorm key words as a class to use as inspiration. Using artwork in the curriculum promotes insight and understanding into the lives of others, as well as deepening learning experiences and enhancing the students' ability tomake meaning in various forms (Gibson & Ewing, 2011).

 

Assessment task: Students identify violations of the Convention on the Rights of the Child that coincide with the forced removal of children from their families, and write a persuasive text on why the convention is so important to our lives. The artworks that the children create will show their understanding of the topic and the effects of the stolen generation on children.

 

Literacy strategy: Students engage in persuasive writing to convince the reader of the importance of child rights and the Convention of the Rights of the Child.

 

 

References:

 

Gibson, R. & Ewing, R. (2011). Transforming the curriculum through the arts. Melbourne: Palgrave Macmillan.

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So you think you're doing it tough?

"So you think you're doing it tough?"

Rebecca Borland's insight:

This video provides a satirical comparison of the life of children in Australia with the 200 million children in the world who work instead of going to school. The underlying message of this video is the unequal rights for children that exist in other countries, and tells students not to take their education and living circumstances for granted while making them aware of the problems that exist in poverty-stricken areas.

 

Teaching idea: Watch the video with the students. Pause the video at 1:23 and discuss what you have seen so far with the students. What is this video saying? Why is it using this particular style of film? Is what they’re saying serious or not? Continue watching the video and talk to students about the comparison. Why have they made this film? Do you think it is better to go to school or to work? Why do these children need to work? Analysing the film by assessing the music, style, and emotions present in the video will help students understand the impact that camera angles and background music have on the mood and tone of a piece (Gibson & Ewing, 2011).

 

Assessment task: Split students into small groups and allocate them each a country with a high poverty rate. Allow them time to research the country and create a report on the disadvantages that children in that country face – child labour, trafficking, poverty rates and so on. Create a PowerPoint presentation to show to the class.

 

Literacy strategy: The assessment task links to report writing and ICT skills, while the teaching idea requires the students to analyse the purpose and style of the video to engage with the message and the content. The use of ICT in teaching writing is highly beneficial due to the subsequent increased knowledge of text structure and the ability to reflect on and edit their writing with greater ease (Winch et al., 2010).

 

 

References:

 

Gibson, R. & Ewing, R. (2011). Transforming the curriculum through the arts. Melbourne: Palgrave Macmillan.

 

Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010). Literacy: reading, writing and children's literature (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

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Miss C Savage's curator insight, August 3, 2015 4:39 AM

This video provides a satirical comparison of the life of children in Australia with the 200 million children in the world who work instead of going to school. The underlying message of this video is the unequal rights for children that exist in other countries, and tells students not to take their education and living circumstances for granted while making them aware of the problems that exist in poverty-stricken areas.

 

Teaching idea: Watch the video with the students. Pause the video at 1:23 and discuss what you have seen so far with the students. What is this video saying? Why is it using this particular style of film? Is what they’re saying serious or not? Continue watching the video and talk to students about the comparison. Why have they made this film? Do you think it is better to go to school or to work? Why do these children need to work? Analysing the film by assessing the music, style, and emotions present in the video will help students understand the impact that camera angles and background music have on the mood and tone of a piece (Gibson & Ewing, 2011).

 

Assessment task: Split students into small groups and allocate them each a country with a high poverty rate. Allow them time to research the country and create a report on the disadvantages that children in that country face – child labour, trafficking, poverty rates and so on. Create a PowerPoint presentation to show to the class.

 

Literacy strategy: The assessment task links to report writing and ICT skills, while the teaching idea requires the students to analyse the purpose and style of the video to engage with the message and the content. The use of ICT in teaching writing is highly beneficial due to the subsequent increased knowledge of text structure and the ability to reflect on and edit their writing with greater ease (Winch et al., 2010).

 

 

References:

 

Gibson, R. & Ewing, R. (2011). Transforming the curriculum through the arts. Melbourne: Palgrave Macmillan.

 

Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010). Literacy: reading, writing and children's literature (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

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Child Labour In India

World Vision Australia gives you an insight into Child Labour in India.

Rebecca Borland's insight:

This video examines child labour in India – the country with the highest child labour rate in the world. Why does it happen? Why is it so common? Why is it wrong? In answering this last question, World Vision refers to the violations of the Convention on the Rights of the Child that exist in child labour. World Vision also offers some potential ways to assist in the abolition of child labour and poverty on an international level – letter writing and buying of fair trade items being two of the most accessible options for stage 3 children.

 

Teaching idea: Engage the class in a discussion about jobs: who has them? Why do they have them? Why they are important? How old someone should be before they get a job? What type of job their first job should be? Explain that there are lots of types of jobs and that some jobs are more dangerous than others. Watch the video with the class and ask them follow up questions about the video: is it okay that children are working instead of going to school? Why are they working instead of going to school? What might happen to the child and their family if they didn’t work? How would it make you feel if you had to get a job instead of going to school with all your friends? What type of jobs are the children working? Is it okay for them to be working dangerous jobs? What are some other dangerous jobs that children should not work? Students work in small groups to create a list of jobs that children should not have, justifying these jobs with reference to the Convention on the Rights of the Child. By reflecting on their own lives and experiences, children are more accurately able to understand exactly how much children in other parts of the world are deprived of (Winch et. al., 2010).

 

Extension: Ask students to research fair trade items that they could buy instead of their usual purchases.

 

Assessment task: Students complete a close passage with answers from the video, which requires them to collect information such as where labour recruiters collect children from, how many children are involved in child labour in India and worldwide, the rights of children and ways in which we can help stop child labour.

 

Numeracy strategy: Using the video as a starting point, students research statistics and numbers of the lives of children in the world – the number of children involved in child labour, the number of children who are orphaned, the number of children who are deprived of food, water and education.

 

 

References:

 

Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010). Literacy: reading, writing and children's literature (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

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Jonas tho's curator insight, March 6, 2014 3:05 AM

Due to the massive population in India, and it's brutaly unfair caste system,  it's no suprise child labour is an issue. We as consunmers have to choose not to by products made by children.

Marte Sødal's curator insight, March 6, 2014 3:06 AM

This video shows us an overwiev of how the system of child labour in India works. It tells us about the ignorance of the community, as well as the denial of childhood. To me it opened my eyes to all the differences there are in the world and to the fact that I should appreciate my life as it is.

Renathe Kristoffersen's curator insight, March 6, 2014 3:15 AM

This video hits my heart. It is so horrible to see whar child labour does to children in India.

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'Know Your Rights' Game

'Know Your Rights' Game | Global Citizenship and Children's Rights | Scoop.it
Rebecca Borland's insight:

This website has an interactive game that helps to introduce children to the Convention on the Rights of the Child. Students can collected all their rights by completing arcade-style games across a virtual city. These rights are taken from the articles of the UN CRC and would be a good introductory or summary activity for students.

 

Teaching idea: This resource would be a good tool to consolidate learning on the Convention on the Rights of the Child and summarise the articles present in the convention. Small groups could participate in the game together, or all students could use the game simultaneously if they have access to a computer lab. Using this activity as a springboard, students will create their own game (virtual or physical – such as a board game or a memory game) based on the Convention on the Rights of the Child. This activity could be done either in small groups/pairs or individually depending on the level of the students.

 

Assessment task: Students successfully create a game based on the CRC in small groups/pairs or individually. The game can be either computer-based or a physical game (such as a board game or memory game). These games should also include a series of instructions. Once the games have been completed, the groups will give a short demonstration and each group will play another group’s game.

 

Literacy strategy: By creating a game and a set of rules, students are identifying the relevant information in the CRC that they want to use and creating a procedure to instruct their classmates on how to play the game. In this way they are learning to write texts for different purposes.

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Miss C Savage's curator insight, August 3, 2015 4:39 AM

This website has an interactive game that helps to introduce children to the Convention on the Rights of the Child. Students can collected all their rights by completing arcade-style games across a virtual city. These rights are taken from the articles of the UN CRC and would be a good introductory or summary activity for students.

 

Teaching idea: This resource would be a good tool to consolidate learning on the Convention on the Rights of the Child and summarise the articles present in the convention. Small groups could participate in the game together, or all students could use the game simultaneously if they have access to a computer lab. Using this activity as a springboard, students will create their own game (virtual or physical – such as a board game or a memory game) based on the Convention on the Rights of the Child. This activity could be done either in small groups/pairs or individually depending on the level of the students.

 

Assessment task: Students successfully create a game based on the CRC in small groups/pairs or individually. The game can be either computer-based or a physical game (such as a board game or memory game). These games should also include a series of instructions. Once the games have been completed, the groups will give a short demonstration and each group will play another group’s game.

 

Literacy strategy: By creating a game and a set of rules, students are identifying the relevant information in the CRC that they want to use and creating a procedure to instruct their classmates on how to play the game. In this way they are learning to write texts for different purposes.

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Convention on the Rights of the Child - Simplified for Children

Rebecca Borland's insight:

This poster was created by Unicef to provide a simplified and child-friendly explanation of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. It explains the first 42 (out of 54) articles of the convention in language that can be easily explained and understood by stage 3 children. This resource would be valuable in both first learning about the CRC, and also as a supplementary resource for children to refer to when doing case studies on human rights. By providing students with the document to look at themselves, they are being given new ideas in a critical atmosphere that welcomes student input (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011).

 

Teaching idea: Organise the class into small table groups and ask them to think of the kinds of things they do for fun. Do all children deserve the right to do things that make them happy? Students list all the rights that they think children should have. After 5-10 minutes, have each group volunteer one or two rights that they have written and compile a list on the board. Once this list is complete, bring out the simplified version of the UN CRC and read it with the children. Have a discussion about these ‘rules’ that are in place to protect children of the world, much like there are rules in a classroom to protect our safety and happiness. The initial joint construction of the text is a quality activity designed to make students think deeply about their own feelings towards the topic. By coming up with their own rights which they may see reflected in the CRC it makes the Convention more meaningful and personal (Winch et. al., 2010).

 

Assessment task: Allocate each student an article of the simplified version of the UN CRC and ask them to research a violation of this right in the world and create a poster. This may include a case study on human rights violations such as child labour and human trafficking, or it may be a look into a relevant institution or group who protects children, such as the Department of Child Services or a charity.

 

Literacy strategy: Reading comprehension. Students are split into small groups and given a copy of the UN CRC and a scenario. They must read the scenario and analyse it to determine which of the articles of the CRC would help improve the life of the child in the scenario.

 

 

References:

 

Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010). Literacy: reading, writing and children's literature (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

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Miss C Savage's curator insight, August 3, 2015 4:39 AM

This poster was created by Unicef to provide a simplified and child-friendly explanation of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. It explains the first 42 (out of 54) articles of the convention in language that can be easily explained and understood by stage 3 children. This resource would be valuable in both first learning about the CRC, and also as a supplementary resource for children to refer to when doing case studies on human rights. By providing students with the document to look at themselves, they are being given new ideas in a critical atmosphere that welcomes student input (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011).

 

Teaching idea: Organise the class into small table groups and ask them to think of the kinds of things they do for fun. Do all children deserve the right to do things that make them happy? Students list all the rights that they think children should have. After 5-10 minutes, have each group volunteer one or two rights that they have written and compile a list on the board. Once this list is complete, bring out the simplified version of the UN CRC and read it with the children. Have a discussion about these ‘rules’ that are in place to protect children of the world, much like there are rules in a classroom to protect our safety and happiness. The initial joint construction of the text is a quality activity designed to make students think deeply about their own feelings towards the topic. By coming up with their own rights which they may see reflected in the CRC it makes the Convention more meaningful and personal (Winch et. al., 2010).

 

Assessment task: Allocate each student an article of the simplified version of the UN CRC and ask them to research a violation of this right in the world and create a poster. This may include a case study on human rights violations such as child labour and human trafficking, or it may be a look into a relevant institution or group who protects children, such as the Department of Child Services or a charity.

 

Literacy strategy: Reading comprehension. Students are split into small groups and given a copy of the UN CRC and a scenario. They must read the scenario and analyse it to determine which of the articles of the CRC would help improve the life of the child in the scenario.

 

 

References:

 

Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010). Literacy: reading, writing and children's literature (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.