global bioenergy trade
30 views | +0 today
Follow
global bioenergy trade
Development of sustainable, international bioenergy trade
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Martin Junginger
Scoop.it!

Carbon Controversy: Should The Northwest Grow Markets For Forest Biofuels? - EarthFix

Carbon Controversy: Should The Northwest Grow Markets For Forest Biofuels? - EarthFix | global bioenergy trade | Scoop.it
EarthFix
Carbon Controversy: Should The Northwest Grow Markets For Forest Biofuels?
EarthFix
A slash pile at a timber harvest site in the Tillimook State Forest. Advocates of woody biomass say slash like this can be used to replace fossil fuels.
Martin Junginger's insight:

Add good article on the carbon debt debate - showing both sides of the story, including the rather hypothetcal concept of burning entire, mature trees of sawn-wood quality vs. what is happening in reality...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Martin Junginger
Scoop.it!

Explosieve groei import houtpellets uit Canada - Duurzaamnieuws.nl

Explosieve groei import houtpellets uit Canada - Duurzaamnieuws.nl | global bioenergy trade | Scoop.it
Explosieve groei import houtpellets uit Canada Duurzaamnieuws.nl Om te voorzien in de Nederlandse behoefte aan houtpellets, een hernieuwbare bron van energie uit houtresten, vindt voornamelijk import plaats, aangezien de binnenlandse productie...
more...
Martin Junginger's comment, April 16, 2013 4:17 AM
Good & accurate informaton
Scooped by Martin Junginger
Scoop.it!

The fuel of the future

The fuel of the future | global bioenergy trade | Scoop.it
WHICH source of renewable energy is most important to the European Union? Solar power, perhaps? (Europe has three-quarters of the world’s total installed capacity...
Martin Junginger's insight:

It is a wide-spread misconception that entire forests are (or will be) chopped down solely for bioenergy. Only an estimated 2% of the domestic solid biomass used for commercial bioenergy in Europe is currently from roundwood, typically from unmerchantable stems or pre-commercial thinnings(1,2). The bulk is wood industry waste- and by-products, agricultural biomass and other organic waste streams.  Large-scale forest harvest for bioenergy does not make economic sense; not in Europe nor in current main exporting regions supplying Europe (3).  Also, EU forests still hold a hugely under-utilized biomass potential – only about 25% of forest residues remaining in the forest after harvest are currently utilized, leaving about 60 million tonnes unused (1.)  For various reasons, imports may deliver wood at lower costs: from the US south, thinnings and small trees from commercial pine plantations (primarily harvested for sawnwood timber, rotation time 25 years) and from Western Canada, dead trees killed by the mountain pine beetle can both provide feedstocks for wood pellets with short carbon-payback times (4) or even instantaneous GHG benefits (5), i.e. much shorter than Searchingers hypothetical example. In both regions, traditional wood industries such as the paper industry are declining, making wood pellet production a new opportunity for those local economies rather than creating competition. Also, producing and transporting wood pellets from Western Canada to Northwestern Europe will typically require typically 15% of their energy content (6) – a penalty similar to fossil fuel supply chains and by no means prohibitive. Finally, while a carbon tax (as suggested by the  Economist) has also drawbacks, the Swedish example (7) shows has proven that under a carbon tax, forest biomass (nowadays covering close to 30% of domestic primary energy use)is a cost-competitive option to reduce GHG emissions.  In summary, it would be lunacy not to use it. 

 

1. Alakangas, E., Junginger, M., Van Dam, J., Hinge, J., Keränen, J., Olsson, O., Porsö, C., Martikainen, A. Rathbauer, J., Sulzbacher, L. Vesterinen, P, Vinterbäck, J. (2012) EUBIONET III - Solutions to biomass trade and market barriers. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews 16 (6) , pp. 4277-4290. DOI: 10.1016/j.rser.2012.03.051

 

2. Diaz-Yanez, O., Mola-Yudego, B., Anttila, P., Röser,D., Asikainen, A. Forest chips for energy in Europe: Current procurement methods and potentials. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews 21 (2013) 562–571.

3. Munsell, J. F. and T. R. Fox (2010). "An analysis of the feasibility for increasing woody biomass production from pine plantations in the southern United States." Biomass and Bioenergy 34(12): 1631-1642.

4. Jonker, J.G.G. , H.M. Junginger, A.P.C. Faaij, Carbon payback period and carbon offset parity point of wood pellet production in the Southeastern USA, accepted by Global Change Biology – Bioenergy, January 2013.

5. Lamers, P., Junginger, M., Dymond, C., Faaij, A. Damaged forests provide an opportunity to mitigate climate change, GCB Bioenergy (2013), doi: 10.1111/gcbb.12055.

6. Sikkema, R., Junginger, H.M., Pichler, W., Hayes, S., Faaij,  A.P.C. (2010), The international logistics of wood pellets for heating and power production in Europe; Costs, energy-input and greenhouse gas (GHG) balances of pellet consumption in Italy, Sweden and the Netherlands, Biofuels, Bioproducts and Biorefining, 4 (2) pp. 132-153. doi: 10.1002/bbb.208

7. http://www.presseurop.eu/en/content/article/47141-carbon-tax-has-stood-test-sweden

more...
No comment yet.