Global and NZ Science Education
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Global and NZ Science Education
About science education in New Zealand and elsewhere
Curated by Michael Winter
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Spy-camera robot penguins infiltrate bird colonies

A BBC documentary team unleashed 50 spycams into penguin colonies, including cameras that served as eyes for robotic penguins, to capture stunning close-up footage of the unusual birds.

 

“Penguins: Spy in the Huddle” documents nearly a year hanging out with penguins through the surrogate eyes of 50 different spycams. Some of the spycams were disguised as chunks of snow or small boulders, but the most adorable cameras were those in the guise of robotic penguins.

 

All these robot spy cameras helped the documentary crew get right into the midst of the penguin colonies without disturbing them or altering their normal behavior. The team was able to capture stunning footage, including that of an Emperor penguin laying an egg, a moment they say was filmed for the very first time.

 

More about this programme:http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01460rf Penguins as they have never been seen before - fifty spy cameras capture unique footage.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Education in Microscopy and Digital Imaging: Fluorescent Proteins - A collection of reviews

Education in Microscopy and Digital Imaging: Fluorescent Proteins - A collection of reviews | Global and NZ Science Education | Scoop.it
The growing class of fluorescent proteins useful for detecting events in living cells and animals has almost single-handedly launched and fueled a new era in biology and medicine.

 

It took over thirty years, and the advent of recombinant DNA as well as vastly improved molecular biological approaches to see the pioneering work of Osamu Shimomura developed into a useful tool for live-cell imaging by Doug Prasher and Martin Chalfie. Just in the past decade, however, we have witnessed a truly remarkable expansion in the fluorescent protein palette, largely driven by the innovative studies from Roger Tsien's laboratory. Most of the fluorescent proteins that are commonly used today have been modified through mutagenesis to optimize their expression in biological systems. Continued efforts using directed evolution approaches will no doubt improve the spectral characteristics, photostability, maturation time, brightness, acid resistance, and utility of the fluorescent protein tags for cellular imaging.

 

The current thrust of fluorescent protein development strategies is centered on fine-tuning the current palette of blue to yellow variants from jellyfish, while simultaneously developing monomeric fluorescent proteins emitting in the orange to far-red regions of the visible light spectrum. We now have jellyfish proteins that span an 80-nanometer portion visible spectrum from deep blue to yellow-green, providing a wide choice of genetically encoded markers for studies in cell biology. Fluorescent proteins derived from Anthozoa species (corals and anemones), as well as other sources, span the entire visible spectrum and feature a wide range of useful properties. The unique optical highlighter properties of fluorescent proteins can allow the investigator to change the color or the emission state, providing unique opportunities to track the dynamic behavior of proteins in living cells and animals.

 

Still the "gold standard" in fluorescent protein technology, the enhanced version of GFP features a chromophore based on a para-hydroxybenzylidene substituted imidazolinone. The chromophore of the first reported red fluorescent protein extends conjugation into the polypeptide backbone to generate fluorescence in the longer wavelength regions. The ZsYellow fluorescent protein chromophore features a novel three-ring system and peptide backbone cleavage due to the substitution of lysine for serine as the first amino acid residue in the chromophore tripeptide. The final step in mKO chromophore maturations involves the formation of a novel five-member thiazole ring system when the Cys65 hydroxyl moiety attacks the carbonyl of Phe64 and cyclizes. In a manner similar to mKusabira Orange, mOrange chromophore maturation involves the formation of a novel five-member oxazole (rather than a thiazole) ring system.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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UNESCO Office in Bangkok: 1:1 in science education: teachers and pupils report positive impact on learning outcomes

UNESCO Office in Bangkok: 1:1 in science education: teachers and pupils report positive impact on learning outcomes | Global and NZ Science Education | Scoop.it
1:1 in science education: teachers and pupils report positive impact on learning outcomes http://t.co/eddRC0wS HT @ICTineducation...
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Famous culinary school stresses science in kitchen - Chicago Daily Herald

Famous culinary school stresses science in kitchen - Chicago Daily Herald | Global and NZ Science Education | Scoop.it
Famous culinary school stresses science in kitchenChicago Daily HeraldThe basics of a culinary education are getting a little less basic at the Culinary Institute of America.
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BYOD in 10 steps - SecEd

Thinking about embracing Bring Your Own Device in your school? Earnie Kramer offers a 10-point guide.
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Science360 - The Knowledge Network

Science360 - The Knowledge Network | Global and NZ Science Education | Scoop.it
Science360 Knowledge Network immerses visitors in the latest wonders of science, engineering, technology and math.

Via Cornélia Castro
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An amazing invisible truth about Wikipedia hiding inside Wikipedia's GeoTag Information

An amazing invisible truth about Wikipedia hiding inside Wikipedia's GeoTag Information | Global and NZ Science Education | Scoop.it

A large number of Wikipedia articles are geocoded. This means that when an article pertains to a location, its latitude and longitude are linked to the article. As you can imagine, this can be useful to generate insightful and eye-catching infographics.

 

A while ago, a team at Oxford built this magnificent tool to illustrate the language boundaries in Wikipedia articles. This led me to wonder if it would be possible to extract the different topics in Wikipedia.

 

This is exactly what I managed to do in the past few days. I downloaded all of Wikipedia, extracted 300 different topics using a powerful clustering algorithm, projected all the geocoded articles on a map and highlighted the different clusters (or topics) in red. The results were much more interesting than I thought. For example, the map on the left shows all the articles related to mountains, peaks, summits, etc. in red on a blue base map.  The highlighted articles from this topic match the main mountain ranges exactly.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Ozone hole shrinks to record low

Ozone hole shrinks to record low | Global and NZ Science Education | Scoop.it
Good news from Antarctica: The hole in the ozone layer is shrinking, new measurements reveal

Via Kathy Bosiak
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Library exhibit puts science, technology at patrons' fingertips - The Spokesman Review

Library exhibit puts science, technology at patrons' fingertips - The Spokesman Review | Global and NZ Science Education | Scoop.it
Library exhibit puts science, technology at patrons' fingertipsThe Spokesman ReviewEva Silverstone, left, and Dennis VanMeter, of the Spokane Public Library, collapse an arch they built as part of the “Discover Tech: Engineers Makes a Difference”...
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Official Launch of the Secretary-General's Global Initiative on Education (Education First)

Official Launch of the Secretary-General's Global Initiative on Education (Education First) | Global and NZ Science Education | Scoop.it
Education First aims to achieve quality, relevant and inclusive education for every child. (RT @WISE_Tweets: Watch!
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Google in Education | ict - tics

Google in Education | ict - tics | Global and NZ Science Education | Scoop.it
September 2012 In this issue: What's new Tools in action Dates to remember Connect (Google in Education via @juandoming | @scoopit http://t.co/MfMDD4fa...)...
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::The #STEM Classroom, Sept 2012- #NSTA

::The #STEM Classroom, Sept 2012- #NSTA | Global and NZ Science Education | Scoop.it

I’ve been thinking a lot about science communication lately. It’s vitally important to the future of the STEM fields for those who are doing the work to have an avenue for making it relatable to the rest of the world. I read this blog post this morning that helped to crystallize my thinking about this topic. I’ve long been an adherent of social constructivism, and the idea of scientific knowledge as socially constructed makes sense to me....


Via Gordon Dahlby
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