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Detecting oceanic carbon dioxide sink today and in the future

Detecting oceanic carbon dioxide sink today and in the future | Climate Change | Scoop.it
The ocean has steadily taken up excess anthropogenic carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, but a slow down is expected in various parts of the ocean. The current observational network needs to be improved to monitor these changes. Using the latest collection of data and state-of-the-art Earth system models, researchers confirm that ocean partial pressure of carbon dioxide has steadily increased following the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration in the past four decades. A large portion of this increase is attributed to the ongoing invasion of anthropogenic carbon dioxide into the ocean, whereas increase in sea surface temperature contributes only marginally.
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Uni Research. "Detecting oceanic carbon dioxide sink today and in the future." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 May 2014. Web. 08 July 2014 <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140528103312.htm>;

 This scoop of knowledge is a study based on the carbon dioxide levels being absorbed by oceans. Jerry Tjiputra of Uni Research states that research collected by his team confirms the steady rise in andropogenic carbon dioxide in our oceans. This parallels the understanding that our atmosphere is also absorbing more carbon dioxide. Using projected models Tjiputra's team observed that the absorption of carbon dioxide in as soon as 2055 may plateau. Inference of this knowledge could assume that our oceans being saturated with carbon dioxide is a huge problem to say the least. What happens when anthropogenic carbon dioxide production rate exceeds our planets ability to cope with? The article goes on to explain the need to further monitor these changes and future changes. 

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Glacier Monitoring | Land Imaging Report Site

Glacier Monitoring | Land Imaging Report Site | Climate Change | Scoop.it
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U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service. 04 Oct 2011. Web. 08 July 2014 <http://eros.usgs.gov/doi-remote-sensing-activities/2011/glacier-monitoring&gt;

This image produced by the National Park Service has an overlay indicating and tracking the glaciers recession in Kenai Fjords national park. The image indicates the size of the glacier beginning at 1950. The next glacial line measured in 1993 indicates a shrinkage of an average 270 meters north, east and south of the glacier. In the later measurements indicated in the image, the glacier appears to be receding at a faster pace per year then earlier in the 1950s. Glacier retreat and calving is major tool being used to observe and track climate change effects. 

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The power of perspective

The power of perspective | Climate Change | Scoop.it
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Jenkins, Amber. "The Power of Perspective." climate.nasa.gov

National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 27 May 2014 Web. 8 July 2014 <http://climate.nasa.gov/blog/1096&gt;

Amber Jenkins, writing a blog for NASA states that climate change is changing mankind's relationship with the land. Jenkins proposes awareness and brings attention to tools that can do just that such as the Change application for iOS devices. The images are taken by NASA and organized into before and after stages to show that climate change is real, and happening. Amber discusses how NASA has been researching our climate with the multitude of satellites and aircraft it maintains. The promotion of awareness is commendable as without it, adaptation will be too late to follow.

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World's Oceans Face "Irreparable Damage" - at The Real News

World's Oceans Face "Irreparable Damage" - at The Real News | Climate Change | Scoop.it
Rashid Sumaila: Global Ocean Commission gives world leaders a five- year window for intervention before overfishing and climate change negatively impact the world's food supply, clean air, and climate stability - July 7, 14 ...
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Sumaila, Rashid. Desvarieux "Worlds Oceans Face "Irreparable Damage" The Real News Network. Broadcast Transcript. 7 July 2014. Web. 8 July 2014 <http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&Itemid=74&jumival=12073&gt;

This news transcript details the interview conducted by Desvarieux of TRNN and Dr. Rashid Sumaila of director of the Fisheries Economics Research Unit at the University of British Columbia. It it Sumaila details a number of prevailing issues with our oceans including overfishing, pollution and acidification. Sumaila gives an example of overfishing in Chile where he states that the country of Chile are catching 100,000  tons of sardines today whereas decades ago they would catch 2 million tons of sardines. Those numbers are vastly different in a relatively short amount of time. Sumaila states that awareness is key, a sentiment shared by many other scientists.

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Changing Antarctic winds create new sea level threat

Changing Antarctic winds create new sea level threat | Climate Change | Scoop.it
New research shows projected changes in the winds circling the Antarctic may accelerate global sea level rise significantly more than previously estimated. Changes to Antarctic winds have already been linked to southern Australia's drying climate but now it appears they may also have a profound impact on warming ocean temperatures under the ice shelves along the coastline of West and East Antarctic.
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Jourdain, Nicolas C. et al.University of New South Wales. "Changing Antarctic winds create new sea level threat." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 July 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140707103633.htm>.

This article about a study done by University of New South Wales indicates that changing winds are affecting sub surface currents approximately 700 meters below the surface. The currents at this depth are warming faster than previously expected, directly affecting the rate of melt around the Antarctic ice sheets. The article states that Antarctic ice sheet melt could contribute 3.3 meters to global sea level. Dr. Nicolas Jourdain concludes that sea level rise is inevitable at our current rate of greenhouse gas emission. 

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Climate change causes high but predictable extinction risks

Climate change causes high but predictable extinction risks | Climate Change | Scoop.it
Judging the effects of climate change on extinction may be easier than previously thought, according to a new article. Although widely used assessments of threatened species, such as the IUCN Red List, were not developed with the effects of climate change in mind, a study of 36 amphibian and reptile species endemic to the US has concluded that climate change may not be fundamentally different from other extinction threats in terms of identifying species in danger of extinction.
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Stony Brook University. "Climate change causes high but predictable extinction risks." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 February 2014. Web 08 July 2014 <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140226074522.htm&gt;

Stony Brook University headed by Dr. Richard G. Pearson has concluded that climate change will contribute factors that may lead to the extinction of many species. Dr. Pearson and his team calculated that of the 36 amphibious and reptile species studied, all of them faced increased risk of extinction by the year 2100. While not necessarily good news, the acknowledgement of these facts could and should spark conservation efforts. Through further study and research, hopefully specific conservation targeting of specific species at increased risk will coincide with environmental cleanup initiatives of the same habitats. 

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Contrasting Views

Contrasting Views | Climate Change | Scoop.it
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Cox and Forkum. 2006. Web. 08 July 2014 <http://therooftopblog.files.wordpress.com/2010/11/global-warming-repent.gif>&nbsp;

This political cartoon expresses the other side of the Climate Change debate. It comically illustrates climate change "believers" as fanatic religious doomsayers. The artist may be describing how he feels persecuted or made to feel guilty about not "reusing, and recycling." While laughable, this claim is a gut check for actual believers in the science of climate change and its effects. Climate change activists must be careful in their approach to bring out awareness of the issue. First and foremost, scientific evidence should be the tool used to convert the masses. In a sense, not yelling at someone makes it easier for them to listen at what is being said. 

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climate-change.pdf

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Dangermond, Jack, Artz, Matt. "Climate Change is a Geographic Problem: The Geographic Approach to Climate Change" ESRI. 2010 Web. 08 July 2014 <http://www.esri.com/library/ebooks/climate-change.pdf&gt;

Dangermond outlines an approach to combat climate change in this e-book. Different places of the world are battling effects of climate change in a variety of ways. With Dangermonds geographic approach, specific problems in local settings and regions will be studied. The information gathered from these situations once examined thoroughly and vetted can indicate steps need to be taken to fix them. The ultimate goal is action to preserve, and Dangermond offers that through geographic study. Dangermond claims that this technology and information has a wide variety of uses for many experts including conservation and agricultural organizations. More organizations need to adopt methods of research and awareness for impacts of climate change such as Dangermond has done.

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"CHASING ICE" captures largest glacier calving ever filmed - OFFICIAL VIDEO - YouTube

On May 28, 2008, Adam LeWinter and Director Jeff Orlowski filmed a historic breakup at the Ilulissat Glacier in Western Greenland."

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LeWinter, Adam. Orlowski, Jeff. "Chasing Ice" Video. Extreme Ice Survey. 28 May 2008 Web. 08 July 2014 <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hC3VTgIPoGU&gt;

Adam Lewinter and Jeff Orlowski luckily managed to video the biggest calving ever recorded for the Extreme Ice Survey. EIS is a an attempt to create awareness of climate change by photographing the glacier retreat and calving over a long period of time. Calving means to split, shed or break off. In this video a glacier calculated at the size of Manhattan breaks and shifts in the ocean, an event that takes approximately one hour. It is hard to conceive the size of it in the video which is why they draw an overlay to help understand the magnitude of the calving. Questions arise when watching, such as how long has this been going on? How often do glaciers break at this magnitude, and will it increase? These are questions EIS are attempting to answer.

 

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Glacier retreat and climate change: Documenting the last 50 years of Alpine Glaciers

Glacier retreat and climate change: Documenting the last 50 years of Alpine Glaciers | Climate Change | Scoop.it
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Diolaiuti, Guglielmina Adele, et al. "Glacier Retreat And Climate Change: Documenting The Last 50 Years Of Alpine Glacier History From Area And Geometry Changes Of Dosdè Piazzi Glaciers (Lombardy Alps, Italy)." Progress In Physical Geography 35.2 (2011): 161-182. Academic Search Premier. Web. 7 July 2014.

Scholarly Journal Article

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