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In Defense of Intelligent Testing | Beautiful Minds, Scientific American Blog Network

In Defense of Intelligent Testing | Beautiful Minds, Scientific American Blog Network | gifted | Scoop.it
I recently published a book called Ungifted: Intelligence Redefined. With a title like that, you'd think the book is one big anti-IQ, anti-testing manifesto. It isn't. While ...
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Rescooped by Bonnie O'Regan from Nurturing Giftedness
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Gifted Children’s Strengths Often Present Challenges

Gifted Children’s Strengths Often Present Challenges | gifted | Scoop.it

"Imagine, if you can, that you are five years old, but you can think like a fourth grader. Where do you find your friends? The other five-year-olds are too immature, and the 10-year-olds don’t take you seriously. If the older kids want you around at all, it’s as a sort of mascot, not as a peer. Physically, you can’t do the things the fourth graders can: you can’t hit a ball very well; you have trouble riding a two-wheeler; you can’t run
as fast. No matter how hard you try, you’ll always be behind the physical and
emotional curve set by older classmates. It’s like being a person who speaks
only German and travels to Italy and France. You like being there, but because
the language and cultures are different, it’s hard to be understood and to get
what you need.


Fitting in with neither their average-ability age peers nor their older intellectual peers, gifted children all too often are teased, put down, and ridiculed by both other children and adults. It’s no wonder, then, that they sometimes feel out of place, weird, inept, and even angry, particularly because they are generally more intense and sensitive than other children. Their emotions, already exquisitely sensitive, often are
exposed, raw, and tender, and their lack of emotional maturity can make their
lives—and yours—a challenge at best and a nightmare at worst.


Gifted children have many wonderful, enjoyable qualities, but when those qualities are combined with emotional and social immaturity, the flip side of those same attributes can look a lot less appealing." - Excerpt from Helping Gifted Children Soar, 2nd
Edition by Carol Strip Whitney, Ph.D. and Gretchen Hirsch


Read more: http://www.greatpotentialpress.com/gifted-childrens-strengths-often-present-challenges


Via Kids Ahoy
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Susan Volinski's curator insight, November 14, 2013 10:13 PM

     This is an excerpt from Carol Strip Whitney and Gretchen Hirsch’s book called “Helping Gifted Children Soar,” discussing emotional roller coaster parents and children must endure. It discusses how gifted children do not fit in with other children because their mentality is not on the same level as their peers. For example, a gifted fourth grader might have the mentality of a 6th grader, but the 6th graders do not want to hang out with him because he is too young, and the gifted student doesn’t hang out with his fourth grade peers because they are too immature. So what friends does a gifted student have other than other gifted students? It’s so sad when a child has a hard time making friends. It’s interesting to note that gifted children have behavioral issues because and may become isolated as they get older because this is not usually an aspect people think about when they think of gifted. The qualities that a gifted child has, such as creative thinking, adult-level thinking, and advanced language abilities can easily backfire on the child. Students may think that their gifted peer is just being stuck up, rude, strange, and overly talkative, which can lead to isolation from peers. This has great effects on the child’s esteem as they get older. If they continue to be isolated by their peers, they may develop depression and other mental problems. This ties in with the other article about how there is a high rate of gifted student dropouts because those students were too smart for the system and they weren’t stimulated enough. On a similar note, gifted students might also drop out because they are not socially accepted by their peers, and at a young age, from what I remember, feeling accepted is really important. Students who are gifted and talented should not be criticized for their abilities and should be accepted by all.  

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Mindsets and Gifted Education | Raising Smarter Kids

Mindsets and Gifted Education | Raising Smarter Kids | gifted | Scoop.it
Carol Dweck's work on mindsets is part of a transformation in progress concerning how people understand giftedness, and how gifted education is delivered. In this article published in the Growth Mindset Blog, we think about ...
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Rescooped by Bonnie O'Regan from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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18 Resources For The Parents Of Gifted Students

18 Resources For The Parents Of Gifted Students | gifted | Scoop.it
18 Resources For The Parents Of Gifted Students

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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SchoolandUniversity's comment, February 25, 2013 4:19 AM
wow amazing gift for students, i am very happy with this !
Rescooped by Bonnie O'Regan from Nurturing Giftedness
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Many Ages at Once | Psychology Today

Many Ages at Once | Psychology Today | gifted | Scoop.it

The science behind the asynchronous development of gifted children By Lisa Rivero...

"Giftedness is 'asynchronous development' in which advanced cognitive abilities and heightened intensity combine to create inner experiences and awareness that are qualitatively different from the norm. This asynchrony increases with higher intellectual capacity. The uniqueness of the gifted renders them particularly vulnerable and requires modifications in parenting, teaching, and counseling in order for them to develop optimally."

"Parents often describe these children as being many ages at once. A five year old, for example, might read third-grade books, lack the small motor coordination necessary for kindergarten art projects, have lengthy conversations with adults, and struggle to communicate effectively with age peers—all at the same time. Asynchronous development becomes less of an issue as children grow up, but the challenges can last well into adolescence."

Read more: http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/creative-synthesis/201201/many-ages-once


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Rescooped by Bonnie O'Regan from Augmented Collective Intelligence
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Collective IQ - Doug Engelbart Institute

Collective IQ - Doug Engelbart Institute | gifted | Scoop.it

"In Doug Engelbart's words, Collective IQ is a measure of how well people can work on important problems and opportunities collectively – how quickly and intelligently they can anticipate or respond to a situation, leveraging their collective perception, memory, insight, planning, reasoning, foresight, and experience into applicable knowledge. Collective IQ is ultimately a measure of effectiveness. It's also a measure of how effective they are at tackling the complex, urgent problem of how to raise their Collective IQ to the highest potential, so they will be that much more effective at solving complex, urgent problems. As the rate and scale of change around the world increases exponentially, so must our collective ability to dramatically increase our Collective IQ to stay ahead of the curve and thrive."


Via Howard Rheingold
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Muriel Flanagan's curator insight, July 23, 2013 8:48 AM

Engelbart's Collective IQ should resonate with all of us who are interdependant in our workflows - and that means all of us.  Individuals need to be able to work as effectively as possible with others, as that allows for leveraging the collective intelligence.  As important as individualism is, one cannot underscore the power and importance of collaborating to the most appropriate conclusion in an increasingly fast-paced world.

Marilyn Korhonen's curator insight, July 23, 2013 9:42 AM
Interesting concept. This is definitely relevant to collaborative research.
Jan Schwartz's curator insight, July 23, 2013 10:40 AM

Not necessary about technology, but certainly about education.  Thanks to Howard Reingold for the scoop.

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Free Webinars About Parenting Gifted Children

Free Webinars About Parenting Gifted Children | gifted | Scoop.it
Are you parenting a gifted child? These free webinars offer insights, advice, and information to support you in that journey!
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