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Rescooped by Cheryl Preyer from Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal
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Protix Acquires Fair Insects and Diversifies by Adding Mealworm, Cricket and Locusts to Its Portfolio

Following the 45M€ funding in June 2017, Protix has acquired Fair Insects. Fair insects is a consortium breeders that have a long history and experience in growing mealworm, cricket and locust. Through this acquisition Protix will be more able to serve customers within the whole spectrum from B2B to food markets with products like protein rich foods, meat replacements and health beverages.

Protix envisions a world with food for all living creatures in balance with nature. Since 2009, Protix has developed cutting-edge technologies and sustainable insect based products that unlock new opportunities for our customers. Insects offer a low-impact protein alternative that can be cultivated sustainably. This is important as global populations continue to grow and the increased demand for meat and fish have devastating consequences like climate change, deforestation and overfishing.

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Screening, Expression, Purification and Functional Characterization of Novel Antimicrobial Peptide Genes from Hermetia illucens (L.)

Screening, Expression, Purification and Functional Characterization of Novel Antimicrobial Peptide Genes from Hermetia illucens (L.) | Getting Buggie & Green | Scoop.it
Abstract
Antimicrobial peptides from a wide spectrum of insects possess potent microbicidal properties against microbial-related diseases. In this study, seven new gene fragments of three types of antimicrobial peptides were obtained from Hermetia illucens (L), and were named cecropinZ1, sarcotoxin1, sarcotoxin (2a), sarcotoxin (2b), sarcotoxin3, stomoxynZH1, and stomoxynZH1(a). Among these genes, a 189-basepair gene (stomoxynZH1) was cloned into the pET32a expression vector and expressed in the Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with thioredoxin. Results show that Trx-stomoxynZH1 exhibits diverse inhibitory activity on various pathogens, including Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli, fungus Rhizoctonia solani Khün (rice)-10, and fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary-14. The minimum inhibitory concentration of Trx-stomoxynZH1 is higher against Gram-positive bacteria than against Gram-negative bacteria but similar between the fungal strains. These results indicate that H. illucens (L.) could provide a rich source for the discovery of novel antimicrobial peptides. Importantly, stomoxynZH1 displays a potential benefit in controlling antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

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Introduction
The need for safe and effective antimicrobial peptides (AMP) has increased with the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains due to excessive use of conventional antibiotics [1]. AMPs are a key factor of the innate immune system of many organisms and play an important role in host-protecting mechanisms from pathogen invasion [2, 3]. Different AMP databases facilitate the screening, identification, and characterization of new antimicrobial peptides [4]. So far, more than 2000 AMPs from vertebrates and invertebrates have been reported according to the antimicrobial peptide database [5].

Although insects lack the specific immune system found in higher animals, they have developed an effective and complex innate immune system obliviously different from the adaptive system of vertebrates [6, 7]. The quick and intensive production of p

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Crickets Make Leap in Demand as a Protein

Published on Jan 17, 2017
(13 Jan 2017)
INSIDE THEIR VERMONT BASEMENT , STEVE AND JEN SWANSON'S BUSINESS IS GROWING.
UPSOUND "Definitely your best batch."
UPSOUND "They are good."
THE SWANSONS STARTED THEIR CRICKET FARM "TOMORROWS HARVEST" TWO YEARS AGO.
SOUNDBITE (English) Steve Swanson/Tomorrow's Harvest:
"Crickets when they're dehydrated are the highest source of, basically, organic protein that there is. They'd be about 70 percent protein and so anyone who's interested in that – bodybuilders, fitness enthusiasts, but anyone who's interested in combating climate change, insects are gonna be part of that solution."
THE EDIBLE INSECTS INDUSTRY GOT A BOOST AFTER A 2013 UNITED NATIONS REPORT ON THE VIABILITY OF USING BUGS TO HELP CURB WORLD HUNGER.
A GROWING NUMBER OF OPERATIONS IN THE U-S ARE NOW RAISING CRICKETS FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION.
THEY CAN BE FOUND IN EVERYTHING FROM PROTEIN BARS TO CHIPS, COOKIES AND PASTA.
SOUNDBITE (English) Nate Clifford/Cornucopia Foods:
"It has all nine essential amino acids. They're eaten all over the world and they're just barely creeping into the western diet."

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Plant- and insect-based agrifood products receive B.C. government funding

Plant- and insect-based agrifood products receive B.C. government funding | Getting Buggie & Green | Scoop.it
Heilu will receive $45,205 for a pilot project to develop sustainable products from locally farmed insects. The name Heilu is taken from the Latin name of the black solider fly larvae, or Hermetia illucens.

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Contest aims to reduce toll of aquaculture on wild fish | Ensia

Contest aims to reduce toll of aquaculture on wild fish | Ensia | Getting Buggie & Green | Scoop.it
Participants in crowd-funded competition use a variety of strategies to develop substitutes for fish food derived from fish
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Bühler and Protix Boost Industrial Scale Insect Production

Bühler and Protix Boost Industrial Scale Insect Production | Getting Buggie & Green | Scoop.it
FoodIngredientsFirst is the source for news, analysis and insights on the food ingredients sector. Key topics of focus include business news, ingredient launches, research & development and ingredient applications. Content is boosted by video interviews and support from Innova Market Insights and The World of Food Ingredients.
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Cochineal Bugs Create Red Dye: A Moment in Science

Award-winning Museum educator Bob Alderink reveals the secret ingredient that gives your strawberry yogurt (and many other foods) a pleasing rosy hue.

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Naturally cool!  Red food from cochineal bugs.
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EU Insect Sector Welcomes Proposal for Authorizing Use of Insect Proteins in Aquaculture

EU Insect Sector Welcomes Proposal for Authorizing Use of Insect Proteins in Aquaculture | Getting Buggie & Green | Scoop.it
FoodIngredientsFirst is the source for news, analysis and insights on the food ingredients sector. Key topics of focus include business news, ingredient launches, research & development and ingredient applications. Content is boosted by video interviews and support from Innova Market Insights and The World of Food Ingredients.
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What is the Future of Meat? #Infographic

What is the Future of Meat? #Infographic | Getting Buggie & Green | Scoop.it
Meat is one of the central elements in our diet around the world. Now, with our increasing demand for meat, scientists have begun turning their attention to alternative sources of protein, from lab grown beef to insect meat.

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Feature: Why insects could be the ideal animal feed

Feature: Why insects could be the ideal animal feed | Getting Buggie & Green | Scoop.it
Regulatory agencies are beginning to weigh the benefits against potential safety risks, including the possibility that insects might accumulate environmental toxins or even transmit diseases to the farm animals that eat them. On 8 October, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) in Parma, Italy, released its first report on the risks of using insects as food and animal feed. It concluded that the risks depend on the insect species used—and that more studies like PROteINSECT are needed before livestock or fish are switched to this new diet. But in other countries the brave new world of industrial-scale insect farming is already on view.

THE BEST WAY TO TURN INSECTS into food is simply to eat them—and in many countries people already do. More than 2 billion people occasionally cook caterpillars, boil beetles, or marinate maggots as part of their traditional diet. In Southern Africa, 9.5 billion mopane caterpillars—named for their favorite tree—are harvested every year for human consumption, and in Uganda, a kilogram of grasshoppers is more expensive than a kilogram of beef.

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Edible Insects StartUp Awarded USDA Innovation Grant - The Food Rush

Edible Insects StartUp Awarded USDA Innovation Grant - The Food Rush | Getting Buggie & Green | Scoop.it
Bugeater Foods, a Nebraska based insect startup, has been awarded a Small Business Innovation Grant (SBIR) from the US Department of Agriculture. The startup will use the funding to conduct research on insect based foods, with a primary focus on extrusions such as rice, pasta and potentially other products.

The startup, formed by three University of Nebraska-Lincoln graduates back in 2015, aims to bring insect based food products to market. Their first product was a cricket powder protein shake, cleverly named Jump.

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ASEAN set up Food and Feed Insects Association

ASEAN set up Food and Feed Insects Association | Getting Buggie & Green | Scoop.it

Countries in the ASEAN* region have set up a Food and Feed Insects Association (AFFIA). With AFFIA, those involved in insect application for feed and food join forces.
Using insects for feed and food is a young sector in the ASEAN region. The mission and aim of AFFIA is to bring industry and research stakeholders from the insects sector in a collaborative movement towards the development of entomoculture, entomophagy and their related activities.

Objectives have been formulated and include:

Define regulatory requirements at National and ASEAN levels for insect products and work in collaboration with the related authorities (national, regional, international).
Work together on access to markets, at local regional and international levels, especially EU and US market.
Work in sub-groups under two main sectors called ‘Food’ and ‘Feed’. Food includes insect species having most of their applications as human food (e.g. pet food [crickets]). Feed includes insect species having most of their applications as animal feed (e.g. waste management).
Promote the consumption of insects.
.Work together on transboundary issues to define shared positions (e.g. halal status)


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Silicon Valley’s power brain food: Crickets

Silicon Valley’s power brain food: Crickets | Getting Buggie & Green | Scoop.it
SAN JOSE, Calif. — For Bay Area techies attuned to the latest trends, kale is no longer cutting it and quinoa is passe. Instead, many are opting for a six-legged snack.
In startup offices around the region, people are munching on crickets.
Proponents say the tiny, chirping bugs are high in protein and iron and can serve as a sustainable alternative to beef or chicken. It's a movement that has people buzzing, with companies such as San Francisco-based Bitty Foods baking the bugs into cookies and chips, Tiny Farms in San Leandro breeding crickets for mass consumption, and New York-based Exo using them in protein bars. The products are showing up in Silicon Valley break rooms, and investors and entrepreneurs are paying close attention.

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GrubTubs joins the Tarmac TX 2017 Cohort and 3M to integrate social and tech

GrubTubs joins the Tarmac TX 2017 Cohort and 3M to integrate social and tech | Getting Buggie & Green | Scoop.it
Generate positive impact with Tarmac TX
Tarmac TX, in partnership with 3M and CALSO, is a one-of-a-kind accelerator for technology startups developing a product or service addressing some of the most pressing social and environmental challenges of our times. Based in Austin, TX, their 9-month program offers selected startups free support services, including a co-working space, events & workshops, mentorship and networking opportunities in both the Tech and the Social ecosystems.

GrubTubs partnering with 3M has broad applications for redifining food safety for both city waste streams and farms.
As GrubTubs aims to support family farms by making feed affordable, there is a real opportunity to change how cities deal with food and food waste. Especially if you recognize that 3M is a partner with Tarmac TX and 3M has a tremendous expertice in wireless tracking, microbial detection, food safety and sensor technology. All of those components are crucial to make the next generation of GrubTubs that deliver safe food/feed to urban farms.

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Enterra Receives CFIA Approval to Sell Insect Larvae to Aquaculture Industry

Enterra Receives CFIA Approval to Sell Insect Larvae to Aquaculture Industry | Getting Buggie & Green | Scoop.it
LANGLEY, BC--(Marketwired - February 15, 2017) - Enterra Feed Corporation has received approval from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) to sell its Whole Dried Black Soldier Fly Larvae as a feed ingredient for salmonids, including farmed salmon, trout and arctic char. With this approval, the Metro Vancouver-based compan
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By 2050, we'll all be eating bugs — on purpose

With more protein and less fat than steak, crickets will soon fuel our every move.
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Shrimp trial sets stage for insect protein in aquafeed

Shrimp trial sets stage for insect protein in aquafeed | Getting Buggie & Green | Scoop.it
French insect protein player Ynsect is warming up the aquaculture feed market in advance of next July, with the release of research results that substantiate the growth performance of its TMP insect meal in shrimp. 
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Crikey! Fruit fly flour beats crickets for cost, says Israeli start-up

Crikey! Fruit fly flour beats crickets for cost, says Israeli start-up | Getting Buggie & Green | Scoop.it
Move over crickets and mealworms - Israeli start-up Flying Spark is farming and processing fruit fly powders and oils that are cheaper than other insect ingredients but with a similar nutritional and taste profile.
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AllAboutFeed - The quest for new proteins: insects for animal feed

AllAboutFeed - The quest for new proteins: insects for animal feed | Getting Buggie & Green | Scoop.it
The use of insects in animal feed is one potential solution to improve the sustainability of animal diets as insects can be an alternative for the currently (less sustainable) used proteins. What are the latest insights and trends in using insects for livestock diets, and which companies are the pioneers and have already made steps in processing them in compound feed? You will read it all here.

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EC ruling is one step closer to putting insects on the dinner table

EC ruling is one step closer to putting insects on the dinner table | Getting Buggie & Green | Scoop.it
How many insects could you buy for $37m (£24m)? Nope, this isn't the first line to a joke, it's the amount an innovative start-up has managed to raise after bugging investors for capital.

In midst of the Brexit vote and Donald Trump winning the US presidential election, you'd be forgiven for having missed some big news for the world's insects.

Yesterday evening the European Commission gave the green light from 1 July 2017 for farmers to start using insects as feed on fish farms.

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Black Solider Fly Larvae: a key livestock for the 21st century

Black Solider Fly Larvae: a key livestock for the 21st century | Getting Buggie & Green | Scoop.it
A growing movement of entrepreneurs is using nature’s perfect decomposers to further close the loop in how we raise our livestock and handle our organic waste. As we continue our search for farming models that can feed a growing planet with diminishing resources, and keep a firm eye towards the agricultural impacts on our climate, the question of what we feed to animals looms large. Research continues to show the efficacy of specialized insect species, like the Black Soldier Fly, as a tool for upcycling organic nutrients into high-quality livestock feed ingredients.

The Black Soldier Fly Larvae (BSFL) are the grubs of the Black Soldier Fly. These grubs are a complete protein with high levels of beneficial fats, vitamins and minerals. In livestock feed for chickens, pigs and aquaculture, BSFL can supplement or even replace water-intensive food crops like soy that could instead go toward feeding people. It can also supplement or replace fishmeal, which contributes to overfishing around the world. Both of these proteins, fishmeal and soy, require vast resources to harvest and grow, from fossil fuels to fresh water, and could be put to a better use feeding people instead of being used as livestock feed.

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Fattening maggots to create a designer food

Fattening maggots to create a designer food | Getting Buggie & Green | Scoop.it
A Broadcom MASTERS finalist wants to make fly larvae a sustainable human snack
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These Dazzling Long Exposures Capture Japan's Fireflies

These Dazzling Long Exposures Capture Japan's Fireflies | Getting Buggie & Green | Scoop.it
Kei Nomiyama captures hundreds of fireflies in mid-air.
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Insects Are Helping Us Develop the Future of Hearing Aids

Insects Are Helping Us Develop the Future of Hearing Aids | Getting Buggie & Green | Scoop.it
The human ear is a miracle of mechanical evolution. It allows us to hear an astonishing range of sounds and to communicate and navigate in... read more
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Edible insect farms creep closer to reality in Europe

Edible insect farms creep closer to reality in Europe | Getting Buggie & Green | Scoop.it
As many have discovered, insects can be a delicious, not-at-all-creepy food source that could save us all from a looming global protein deficit. The good news is that the main objection to raising insects for food and livestock feed – that it poses insurmountable chemical and biological health risks – has been tentatively ruled out by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), which says edible insects appear to pose no more of a chemical or biological hazard than any other form of livestock farming.

In preparing their report, EFSA researchers drew data from peer reviewed scientific studies from France, the Netherlands and Belgium to create a risk profile identifying the potential biological, chemical and environmental hazards associated with farmed insects. According to the report, the presence of these hazards would depend on production methods, the substrate (the food the insects are raised on), the lifecycle stage at which the insects are harvested, the insect species and methods of further processing.

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