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Geography of Quinoa

Geography of Quinoa | #georic | Scoop.it

"The popularity of Quinoa has grown exponentially among the health-conscious food consumers in the developed economies of the world.  Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wah) is rich in protein and is a better grain for those seeking to lose weight.  Quinoa has historically be rather limited but this diffusion is restructuring the geographic patterns of many places." 


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

This article is interesting because it talks about a poorer countries best commodities and its difficulty with making money off of it in the market because of the rise in prices. Quinoa is very popular and may create massive poularity and wealth for producers in the country on a global level but have recently have had to deal with issues of high prices in the market. Bolivia has many poor people and have also searched for government subsidies so that people can afford to but them. This article is a prime example of how indeginous people have a difficult time maximizing earning from powerful natural resources while other global companies or players in the game could make most of the money off of their industry such as areas in East Africa were diamond mines exist, and chocolate markets but the countries themselves profit very little because Big business is in control of the major profits worldwide.

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Jason Schneider's curator insight, February 9, 2015 10:10 PM

Quinoa appears to be originated as grain crop for edible seeds in parts of Bolivia, Argentina, Peru and along to Andes Mountain. However, they increase the crop value as it spreads to other areas of the world such as Europe and United States. One thing that I wonder is that if the production is going to be popular in any region other than South America but manufacturing regions started on eastern United States and they spread overseas to Europe. I wonder if production of Quinoa will spread to other continents. Believe it or not, it has partially spread to small parts of southwestern Europe.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:20 PM

Quinoa will be a staple for generations to come and the countries of Peru, Bolivia, Uruguay and Argentina would do well to provide all the assistance to the farming community in their respective countries. This product is like New Age rice, it provides multiple benefits to health conscious consumers such as protein, fiber, and a "full" feeling when consumed. Any recipe that calls for a rice base can incorporate Quinoa just as easily and it tastes great. being a bit of a health freak, I use Quinoa in my diet and it works.

While the success of the grain has made it less accessible price-wise to those who grow it, it should provide for a greater economic benefit for years to come, lifting a population from near poverty levels to hopefully one of a strong and vibrant middle class.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 2, 2015 3:43 PM

Quinoa has been grown in the high mountains of the Andes for decades and has been a localized food for the population. As their health benefits became known in to the global community, the demands for them increases. This made it difficult for the locals to find cheap Quinoa, which is normally eaten in their diet. I feel that it is unfair for the locals to have seek new source of food alternatives now that their healthy Quinoa will become more expensive as the demand for it goes up.

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Smarter Food: Does big farming mean bad farming?

Smarter Food: Does big farming mean bad farming? | #georic | Scoop.it
In Minnesota, ‘industrial’ operation shows effort to balance economic, environmental sustainability.

Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

The author of thid article shares how his father moved to the farm in search for economic prosperity and opportunity. Then as a soon he desires one day to make his fathers farm into a place were organic food would be sold one day. Due to land projects and government needing the land his fathers orginal agricultural enterprise in the Minnesota region shifted. I was very suprised after reading this article that the best way to have economic and environmental sustainability is to work with with the markets and develop genetically modified foods as the most viable way to create a surplus in a highly urbanized growing landscape. I found it very saf fake food is prefered over real food that ws once made though the old school agricultural process of sowing reaping and harvesting natural foods to be placed in the market and provided to people.

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Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:33 AM

The large-scale agricultural practices of modern America tend to lend to the bad image of commercial farming. However, the practices are actually helping feed more people in the US, but they also use genetically modified crops and other highly debated techniques.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 11:45 AM

Yes it does because in all large scale endeavors, regardless of what for, the quality is always sacrificed for the quantity because it becomes cheaper to produce and profits are greater.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:56 PM

In the long run, a successful farmer needs to find a balance between economic and environmental sustainability.  Some big farms are working towards that so the 'big-equals-bad' narrative about agriculture may be easy, but it doesn't tell the whole story about modern agriculture. 

 

Tags: GMOssustainability, agriculture, agribusiness

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Geography in the News: Pumpkins

Geography in the News: Pumpkins | #georic | Scoop.it

"Halloween and Thanksgiving are just around the corner and pumpkins are already showing up at roadside stands. Jack o’lanterns, decorative displays and pumpkin pies are the main destinies of most pumpkins in the United States. Elsewhere in the world, however, the pumpkin is nearly exclusively considered a food crop or animal feed."


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

The name Curbita class for pumkins sounds interesting. This fruit os grown all over the world excpet antarctica and has been harvest for 7000 by native Americans thruought history. I thought that this articel on pumkins was intersting given the way they are manufactured. They can be sold as jackolanterns or pumking pie filling during harvest season. It was interesting that the top places in the world were pumkins are harvest os Argentina, USA South Africa, Egypt India, and china. The USA uses the pumkin in connection with Thanksgiving or Halloween symbolism, but elsehere in the world it is used as a food crop or food for animals.I found this article to be interesting because I never knew that the pumkin was grown all around the world. I thought that it was an exclusive food to at least the Americas.

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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 4:25 PM

I have been a long-time fan of pumpkin coffee, and tomorrow I will probably have some with my cousins and family... Some areas of Asia allow consumption of dogs, other areas of the US allow consumption of roadkill, and that is different from what most people in RI are used to... So I guess, it's not really my business what other people and countries do with their pumpkin crops, as long as it doesn't negatively affect other people.  My neighbor has won some prizes, I think 3rd place in RI for largest pumpkin contests, which is pretty cool, because for several months, you can see their pumpkin garden from my backyard.  Those pumpkins are enormous, and made me wonder if there was anything being done to make the modified pumpkins more usable in food.  I know GMOs are a touchy issue, but to feed the starving people around the world, you have to wonder if one pumpkin at 2000 lbs could feed a village of people.  Lots of people that don't like GMOs probably do unhealthy things in other ways, so their huge activism movements really boggle me.  Labeling GMOs is one thing, but stopping genetic modifications seems as controversial as starting them, especially when some people can benefit from them.  Whatever, I guess pumpkins are cool for whatever people want to do with them, including smashing them... this week on RIC's campus I saw a smashed pumpkin.  The only thing that really popped into my head was not "what a waste," or "oh, those delinquents," but rather "that seems fun."  I did assume though, that no one was hurt by the smashing of the pumpkin...

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 2014 5:14 PM

Although you wouldn't think it there are many different countries and specific regions that demonstrate the perfect cropping land and fertilization process to grow pumpkins. Out of the US power house pumpkin growing Illinois is named number 1. Along side California, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvainnia, Mississippi. But lets travel abroad to Africa, now me personally I wouldnt think that there are alot of pumpkin patches in Africa but there are many different places in Africa that pumpkins are grown. SOme of these places are Egypt with (690,000) and then there is South Africa with (378,776). I found these numbers quite interesting because one wouldn't think that there are pumpkin patches in Africa.

Pamela Shields's curator insight, August 29, 2014 10:10 AM

@Danyl †  so inspirational!

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Factory Food From Above: Images of Industrial Farms

Factory Food From Above: Images of Industrial Farms | #georic | Scoop.it

"Feedlots, a new series of images crafted by British artist Mishka Henner, uses publicly available satellite imagery to show the origins of mass-produced meat products."

 

Tags: Food, agriculture, agribusiness, unit 5 agriculture.  


Via Seth Dixon
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Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 11:35 AM

British artist Mishka Henner took photographs and enhanced the colors of feedlots to reveal the agribusiness of meat production. Photographs of feedlots are considered illegal and the legal repercussions of Mishka Henner are not clear at the moment, but the photographs are shocking and reveal again how little Americans know about their food production. 

Americans have changed the places and utilized them to build agribusiness empires and have introduced new problems to the landscape of feedlot and farming towns.

 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 4:46 AM

This article makes me sickened. With previous knowledge of factory farms I know of the horrors that go on but this takes the cake. These pictures shown in the article depict the chemical and waste spill off which I am absolutely sure this is NOT good for the environment.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:56 PM

Beautiful imagery at one scale tells an unsavory story at another.