George Orwell
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George Orwell
Welcome the George Orwell Scoop.it page! Did you find Orwell's writing style to be difficult? Were you lost in his political references? Do you understand his linguistic musings? This page gives you access to articles that will help you understand George Orwell and his writing ("Politics and the English Language" and 1984).
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George Orwell's Biggest Fear Went Far Beyond Big Brother ...

George Orwell's Biggest Fear Went Far Beyond Big Brother ... | George Orwell | Scoop.it
George Orwell's novels feature recurring theme of thwarted attempts to escape from modern society, culminating in the dystopian future of "1984."
Tyler Evans's insight:

Check out this article, which reminds us that 1984 is a work of science fiction.  Take a look at the other themes that Orwell discusses in his works.

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Who wouldn't say it's '1984'? Well, Orwell, for one: Opinion - Los Angeles Daily News

Who wouldn't say it's '1984'? Well, Orwell, for one: Opinion - Los Angeles Daily News | George Orwell | Scoop.it
Who wouldn't say it's '1984'? Well, Orwell, for one: Opinion Los Angeles Daily News Not so fast, say those who know there's more to the novel by George Orwell than "Big Brother is Watching You." "Sorry, It's Not 1984," writes Michael Moynihan at...
Tyler Evans's insight:

Does the media overuse and misuse Orwell's name and certain elements of 1984 ("Big Brother is Watching You") for political means? This article argues that this misuse often lacks meaning (and think about how this ties into the "stale metaphors" idea of "Politics and the English Language"). 

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Persuade with Visual Metaphors: Neuromarketing

Persuade with Visual Metaphors: Neuromarketing | George Orwell | Scoop.it

While we think of metaphors as mainly word-based, visual metaphors can be a potent selling tool. They can both engage the brain like text metaphors and stimulate the viewer’s senses in a way that words alone may not.

 

I ran across an ad for Austin-based Elements Laser Spa that includes both a visual metaphor and a play on words. The ad shows a rose with its thorns removed, while its headline text reads, “Nice Stems.” (For international Neuromarketing readers, “stems” is slang for “legs.”)

 

This ad is brilliant in several ways. First, it produces an “aha!” reward to the viewer’s brain since most readers will understand the cryptic ad only when they look at the small print below. (The print version of this ad has a small box below the illustration that offers a discount on laser hair removal. The long-stemmed rose with the little pile of thorns won’t make sense at first, but upon seeing the text in the discount offer just about every viewer will immediately grasp what’s going on.


Via Ashish Umre
Tyler Evans's insight:

Take a look at this advertisement (and accompanying article).  For Orwell, good writers can create fresh, enduring metaphors.  They don't rely on "stale metaphors."  Considering this idea, be sure to focus on the three qualities of metaphors, as presented in this article.  How does this literary concept translate in the world of visual art?

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Laurene Franzon's curator insight, October 13, 2013 12:51 PM

Neuromarketing par l'image

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Language Matters: Framing The Copyright Monopoly So We Can Keep Our Liberties

Language Matters: Framing The Copyright Monopoly So We Can Keep Our Liberties | George Orwell | Scoop.it
George Orwell was scaringly right in many ways, but one of his most overlooked points is one of the most important. The language we use defines our reality and what problems we perceive, communicate, and solve.
Tyler Evans's insight:

Skim through this article to see how Orwell's concepts of the manipulation of language and the "Newspeak" policy of 1984 collide.  Remember this article is trying to support a particular viewpoint.  Do you agree with that viewpoint?  Why or why not?

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Active or Passive—Which Voice Is Best? | Elite Editing Blog

Active or Passive—Which Voice Is Best? | Elite Editing Blog | George Orwell | Scoop.it
In academic writing, students are often encouraged to use an 'objective' voice; to focus on methodologies, arguments, evidence and results in a way that keeps the author/researcher in the background. Passive sentence ...
Tyler Evans's insight:

Another article on the passive voice versus the active voice.

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Our Surveillance Society: What Orwell And Kafka Might Say | NPR

Our Surveillance Society: What Orwell And Kafka Might Say | NPR | George Orwell | Scoop.it

 

President Obama says he's not Big Brother. The author who created the concept might disagree.

 

Addressing the controversy over widespread government surveillance of telephone records and Internet traffic Friday, Obama said, "In the abstract, you can complain about Big Brother and how this is a potential program run amok, but when you actually look at the details, then I think we've struck the right balance."

 

But for many commentators, revelations this week that the federal government is sweeping up records of communications and transactions between millions of Americans sounds uncomfortably like the vision of the British novelist and journalist George Orwell.

 

His novel Nineteen Eighty-Four portrayed a society in which the state constantly tracks the movements and thoughts of individuals. Its slogan is "Big Brother Is Watching You."

 

"Throwing out such a broad net of surveillance is exactly the kind of threat Orwell feared," says Michael Shelden, author of Orwell: The Authorized Biography.

 

The phrases "Big Brother" and "Orwellian" have been commonplace in news coverage and social media this past week. Orwell's novel, a bestseller upon publication in the 1940s, has remained a classic because it seems to crystallize what life under totalitarian regimes looks like.

 

Obama — and many others — insist that the U.S. is not living under such a regime. The government is not listening to everyone's telephone calls, , nor is it using the information to spy on innocent Americans.

 

And, even in the tradition of prophetic literature that warns of the dangers of bureaucratic power run amok, there is an awareness that the protection of the state, while intrusive, is necessary.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Tyler Evans's insight:

Pay attention to how Orwell's themes (i.e. government surveillance) play a role in current events.  The terms "Orwellian" and "Big Brother" seemed to have morphed into a sort of political jargon.  Based on what you've read in "Politics and the English Language," do you think Orwell would agree with these terms being used in this way?

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(EN) - Style Guide | The Economist

(EN) - Style Guide | The Economist | George Orwell | Scoop.it

"Authoritative weekly newspaper focusing on international politics and business news and opinion.

 

The first requirement of The Economist is that it should be readily understandable. Clarity of writing usually follows clarity of thought. So think what you want to say, then say it as simply as possible. Keep in mind George Orwell's six elementary rules ("Politics and the English Language", 1946 ..."


Via Stefano KaliFire
Tyler Evans's insight:

This is a gem! A style guide, based on Orwell's six rules of writing from "Politics and the English Language." 

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George Orwell Biography

George Orwell Biography | George Orwell | Scoop.it
Learn about George Orwell, British writer of such dystopian classics as Animal Farm and Nineteen Eighty-Four, on Biography.com.

Via Chris Turner
Tyler Evans's insight:

A concise biograph.  Did Orwell's travels and military experience influence the subjects he wrote about?

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The Metaphor of Disruptive Innovation

The Metaphor of Disruptive Innovation | George Orwell | Scoop.it
Metaphors are how we, as humans, explain one thing in terms of another, for example understanding a logical argument as a building: “That argument has a strong foundation,” or “That argument crumbl...

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Tyler Evans's insight:

Read this article, which focuses on metaphors.  Orwell's idea of "dying metaphors" is evident here.  Skim the article, but make sure to pay attenion to the discussion of this literary concept.  Also, how can a term like "disruptive innovation" lose its meaning?

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Digital Media's Reaction To George Orwell | SPLICETODAY.com

Digital Media's Reaction To George Orwell | SPLICETODAY.com | George Orwell | Scoop.it
In his 1946 essay "Politics and the English Language," George Orwell slammed political and literary classes for hiding behind grandiose and misleading language. Writers, Orwell argued, concealed the truth by using fancy ...
Tyler Evans's insight:

"Most people who bother with the matter at all would admit that the English language is in a bad way..."  Orwell makes it clear that the English language is suffering and in need of reform, but do twenty-first century criticisms of the language allign with Orwell's assertions?  How has digital media affected the English language?  Compare this article with Orwell's essay and find out!

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George Orwell's critique of internet English - The Guardian (blog)

George Orwell's critique of internet English - The Guardian (blog) | George Orwell | Scoop.it
The Guardian (blog)
George Orwell's critique of internet English
The Guardian (blog)
From this, any struggle against the abuse and impoverishment of English online (notably, in blogs and emails) becomes what Orwell called "a sentimental archaism".
Tyler Evans's insight:

This article places Orwell's main point in perspective.  Do you see any similarities in style between "Politics and the English Language" and this blog post?  Would you agree more with Orwell that language is something that we can consciously shape, or are your thoughts more alligned with Jonathan Swift, as mentioned in this post?

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A Guide To Using The Active Voice Rather Than The Passive Voice

A Guide To Using The Active Voice Rather Than The Passive Voice | George Orwell | Scoop.it
One of the things which you should avoid when creating content for websites, writing blog posts or developing any other web content is the passive voice. It's often been said that the passive voice...
Tyler Evans's insight:

One of Orwell's tips for writing: "Never use the passive where you can use the active."  What does he mean by this?  Check out this article for an explanation of this important writing skill.

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