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Are container ships getting too big?

Are container ships getting too big? | GEOPOLITICS | Scoop.it

What is blue, a quarter of a mile long, and taller than London's Olympic stadium?  The answer - this year's new class of container ship, the Triple E. When it goes into service this June, it will be the largest vessel ploughing the sea.  Each will contain as much steel as eight Eiffel Towers and have a capacity equivalent to 18,000 20-foot containers (TEU).  


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Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, October 7, 2015 1:17 PM

These vessels are specifically made to increase more profit and is a symbol of economic power for trades between Europe and Asia. They aim to increase containment of cargo so it is more efficient and time consuming of going back to fourth. However, they forced ports to become bigger to compete and keep up with these new inventions. These ships are getting too big and are only able to transit through the Suez canal and cannot go through the Panama. This lead to the Chinese expanding their reach to Nicaragua and building a larger canal to be able to pass through Central America.

Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 2016 7:42 PM

These containers are symbols of global commerce that enable economies of scale to be profitable and the outsourcing of so many manufacturing jobs to developing countries.  The invention of these containers have changed the geography of global shipping and the vast majority of the world's largest ports are now in East Asia.  Today though, the biggest container ships are too big to go through the Panama Canal, encouraging China to build a larger canal through Nicaragua.    

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:18 AM

These containers are symbols of global commerce that enable economies of scale to be profitable and the outsourcing of so many manufacturing jobs to developing countries.  The invention of these containers have changed the geography of global shipping and the vast majority of the world's largest ports are now in East Asia.  Today though, the biggest container ships are too big to go through the Panama Canal, encouraging China to build a larger canal through Nicaragua.      


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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THE ROMAN WAR MACHINE - LONG DOCUMENTARY PART 1

Rome was just another city until it discovered the secrets of warfare. Once they perfected the art of combat, the Romans exerted their influence from Asia to...
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How Vietnam became a coffee giant

How Vietnam became a coffee giant | GEOPOLITICS | Scoop.it

"Think of coffee and you will probably think of Brazil, Colombia, or maybe Ethiopia. But the world's second largest exporter today is Vietnam. How did its market share jump from 0.1% to 20% in just 30 years, and how has this rapid change affected the country?"

 


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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:29 PM
Typically I would always associate coffee and coffee beans coming from Spanish speaking countries and I would associate Asian countries with drinking tea. This threw me for a little twist, The Vietnamese do drink coffee though. Coffee was introduced to Vietnam in the 19th century by the French. A majority of their coffee beans are exported since the country needs money. After the Vietnam war had ended, their communist ally, The Soviet Union did nothing to help the crippled country. Agriculture was a disaster, bu the government decided to take a risk in the 80s with growing coffee. It was a success and kept increasing 20%-30% every year in the 90s. Now it employs over two million people. Even major brands like Nestle has coffee bean growing rights there.
Richard Aitchison's curator insight, April 3, 8:22 AM
So how does a traditionally tea drinking country, become the 2nd biggest export of coffee? Well we need to look at colonization and well desperation. While the Vietnamese still prefer to drink tea many of the French that were there during colonization prefered coffee. However, coffee production never really took off until post Vietnam War and with a desperation move to help the economy. With a floundering economy and practices that were not working the government turned its eye to coffee production. At the time 60% of Vietnamese people lived below the poverty line, however nowadays they are just about under 10%. It is not without its problems as it has caused problems with destruction of land and heading into the future they have started to exhaust all of the lands that they can use to produce coffee.  They will need to continue to be innovative if they want to continue to see a surge in the coffee market. It is definitely interesting to see why and how certain items are exported out of countries and the history behind it. I for one would never think Vietnam would be a coffee giant.  
tyrone perry's curator insight, May 1, 12:59 PM
Vietnam is one of the highest coffee producers of the world.  It help bring down the poverty level in the country.  But when something good happens of course something negative has to happen.  Many of Vietnam’s fields are thought to still be filled with mines from the war.  Because of that many forests have been cut down to provide fields to grow the coffee.  Needless to say their environmental dangers are rising.
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40 charts that explain the world

40 charts that explain the world | GEOPOLITICS | Scoop.it

Our friend and colleague Max Fisher over at Worldviews has posted another 40 maps that explain the world, building on his original classic of the genre. But this is Wonkblog. We're about charts. And one of the great things about charts is that they show not just how things are -- but how they're changing.

So we searched for charts that would tell not just the story of how the world is -- but where it's going. Some of these charts are optimistic, like the ones showing huge gains in life expectancy in poorer nations. Some are more worryisome -- wait till you see the one on endangered species. But together they tell a story of a world that's changing faster than at arguably any other time in human history.


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How people in Muslim countries prefer women to dress in public

How people in Muslim countries prefer women to dress in public | GEOPOLITICS | Scoop.it
Even as publics in many of the surveyed Muslim-majority countries express a clear preference for women to dress conservatively, many also say women should be able to decide for themselves what to wear.

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Ignacio Garrido's curator insight, January 14, 2014 10:19 AM

Execise 18 :

 

1. You have to send the answer by moodle

2. To sum up the new in 5 lines.

3. What do you think about this way of dress?

4. What is the favourite way of muslim dress prefer in each countries?

5. Who has written the new? Do you think is he/she objective? Why?

6. Is these new as you can wath on TV ? Think your answer.

7. Can you relationed the pictures ( number in graphic ) with its real name ( in the text of the new )?

 

Good Luck

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 2014 2:57 PM

I am not sure if it is because I am an independently raised western woman but this whole article seems to completely address women as property.  I realize that some countries are much stricter than others but it is not something I can comprehend.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 22, 2015 7:09 PM

It appears our friends in Saudi Arabia like their women to be almost completely hidden from view with 74% claiming that the most appropriate dress is to have no more than the eyes showing while in public. Pakistan is the second most tolerant at a distant 35%. Overall, the most popular "form" for women in public is to show the facial region only with 44% of countries surveyed agreeing. On the other end of the spectrum is Lebanon who think that women with no head dress is appropriate nearly half the time. Turkey is in second with 32% believing that this is okay.

Put another way, Lebanon thinks it is okay for their women to dress with no head dress by a 15-1 ratio over the Saudi's. Unbelievable that I am writing about this in the year 2015. The Middle East should allow more than the middle of their women's face to be shown. Lebanon seems to be the most tolerant, let's hope the rest of the countries can follow their lead.

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World of Change

World of Change | GEOPOLITICS | Scoop.it

"Earth is constantly changing. Some changes are a natural part of the climate system, such as the seasonal expansion and contraction of the Arctic sea ice pack. The responsibility for other changes, such as the Antarctic ozone hole, falls squarely on humanity’s shoulders. Our World of Change series documents how our planet’s land, oceans, atmosphere, and Sun are changing over time."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 6, 2014 1:08 PM

This article from NASA's Earth Observatory highlights 25 classroom-ready examples of environmental change that can readily detected with satellite imagery. 


Tags: remote sensing, land use, environment, geospatial, environment modify, unit 1 Geoprinciples.

Juan Carlos García Arpín's curator insight, February 10, 2014 6:39 AM

Un planeta en cambio permanente

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The Real Pirates of the Caribbean

The Real Pirates of the Caribbean | GEOPOLITICS | Scoop.it
Explore the travels and exploits of five real pirates of the Caribbean. Click through the tabs to track the adventures of each pirate overlaid on Spanish ports and pirate strongholds in the area. Zoom into the map to see additional detail.
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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 11, 2015 10:00 PM

This pirate excursion map is so cool and gives a great look at the travels of different pirates.  As we get farther away from these time periods, it seems like the idea of these Caribbean pirates are fictional.  To hear true historical events about these individual pirates is very interesting.  I would  love to take a time machine back to Port Royal during these times to experience that madness.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 28, 2015 9:34 AM

Imagine the horror a native of the Caribbean must have felt when white men came into their scenic lands and pillaged their villages and plundered their treasuries? Blackbeard otherwise known as Edward Teach, would light slow burning cannon fuses and place them in his beard to create an aura about him as he fought and raided these port of call. Calico Jack Rackham, a great pirate name if there ever was one, was best known for having  a pair of female pirates aboard. Instantly becomes one of my heroes! Then you have William Parker who was actually an opportunist backed by England who plundered Spanish treasures throughout Central America. Here is my favorite pirate joke; what is a pirate's favorite letter? "R" you say? No, it's the letter "C", pirates love the sea....

Dr. Helen Teague's curator insight, September 14, 2015 9:28 AM

very interesting interactive map

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Chart of the Week: Coffee and tea around the world

Chart of the Week: Coffee and tea around the world | GEOPOLITICS | Scoop.it
Worldwide tea is far more popular than coffee, but preferences for one beverage over the other fall into distinct geographic patterns.

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Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, December 25, 2013 3:55 AM

Mapa que muestra el consumo del té y del café en el mundo

Narcélio de Sá's curator insight, December 27, 2013 4:45 PM

Café ou chá? 

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Sub-Saharan Africa loses 5.7 percent of GDP to illicit financial outflows – Africa Progress Panel

Sub-Saharan Africa loses 5.7 percent of GDP to illicit financial outflows – Africa Progress Panel | GEOPOLITICS | Scoop.it
Money laundering and #tax evasion & avoidance deny #African countries of finances urgently needed for #development: http://t.co/3HwUhl87ef.

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