The Geography Classroom
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The Geography Classroom
Linking geographic concepts to human and environmental issues
Curated by Elisha Upton
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Earth's Green Places Mapped

"Although 75% of the planet is a relatively unchanging ocean of blue, the remaining 25% of Earth's surface is a dynamic green. Data from the NASA/NOAA Suomi NPP satellite is able to detect these subtle differences in greenness. The resources on this page highlight our ever-changing planet, using highly detailed vegetation index data from the satellite, developed by scientists at NOAA. The darkest green areas are the lushest in vegetation, while the pale colors are sparse in vegetation cover either due to snow, drought, rock, or urban areas. Satellite data from April 2012 to April 2013 was used to generate these animations and images."


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Louis Culotta's curator insight, July 16, 2013 5:05 PM

This is something to check out if you want to see first hand look at the green and not so green places on our planet. It really makes you see the parts of the world that get enough rain and the areas that don't that makes what we see from Satellite images from space.

Magnus Gustafsson's curator insight, July 16, 2013 5:13 PM

Useful insiight how we humans can change the world!

Al Picozzi's comment, July 18, 2013 11:19 AM
Can really see the effect of development in the Amazon river basin. Also this system can be a great use to help in areas that are facing a drought.
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What is GIS?

This is a brief introduction to what geographic information systems are.  This is not a tutorial on how to use it, but a conceptual overview on the potential uses and applications for GIS.  

 

Tags: GIS, video, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples, geospatial, mapping and location.


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CT Blake's curator insight, September 28, 2014 10:55 AM

Useful for understanding the use of GIS and differences with GPS.

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Texas Storm Was Over Eight Miles High

Texas Storm Was Over Eight Miles High | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
The astonishing power of Mother Nature....

 

3D NASA images show the magnitude of last week's storm in Texas was immense, vertically towering 8 miles above the Texas landscape.  The storm "spawning 14 tornadoes and golf ball sized hail was immense...[NASA's] Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite watched the storm develop and measured its cloud height at above eight miles high." 


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Using satellite images, young students learn about human impact on environment

Using satellite images, young students learn about human impact on environment | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

"With the help of satellite images fifth and sixth grade students at Mr. Tim Blum’s geography class at the University of Wyoming Lab School got a birds-eye view of how humans have impacted or modified their environments. Images acquired by satellites decades apart showed cleared forests, irrigated crop fields in the middle of the deserts, altered landscapes (new roads and water bodies), and urban growth."

 

SD: Geospatial technologies can sound daunting for teachers that don't feel that they are specialists. Yet there are simple ways to make sophisticated technologies very relevant to just about any grade level as this article demonstrates. 


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joachim jake layes's curator insight, February 10, 2014 9:44 AM

great to see 5th & 6th graders learning about environmental impact

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Urban Observatory

Urban Observatory | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

The Urban Observatory city comparison app enables you to explore the living fabric of great cities by browsing a variety of cities and themes.


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Utiya Chusna Sitapraptiwi's curator insight, July 15, 2013 5:44 AM

Easy to find a picture of the city in the world. 

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 5:45 PM

I have been using Google Earth to check out a few different areas that I have and have not been to, particularly Washington D.C./Maryland, which I visited last month for the first time.  I thought it was truly awesome and loved all the subtle differences as well as the larger and more obvious differences from RI.  This Observatory is pretty interesting, and doesn't limit your observations to strictly visual perceptions, unlike most Astrological Observatories.  It is a compendium of knowledge, information, and facts that define and characterize, categorize and redefine areas of the world.  This seems like something out of Minority Report or Deja Vu (two really good sci-fi movies with visual observation technology that looks through time), both because of its appearance, and because of its general function.  It also reminds me of some stuff that I've seen in the 1967 "The Prisoner" series, which really blew my mind about sociological portayals of the occasionally subversive human condition from entirely oppressing parties and circumstances.  Hopefully this information will, as comes with great power, be treated with great responsibility... For all our sakes.

David Week's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:05 PM

Nice. I'm going to try it.

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What is Geo-literacy?

Geo-literacy extends far beyond knowing where places are on a map.  National Geographic Education has put an emphasis on geoliteracy, which entails spatial thinking skills and understanding systems in addition to content knowledge about locations and places. 


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Adam Lenaarts's curator insight, September 30, 2013 6:33 PM

Geo literacy explained to all people that don't know I Teacher Much more than just places...

Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 1, 2013 10:32 AM

Geo-literacy extends far beyond knowing where places are on a map.  National Geographic Education has put an emphasis on geo-literacy, which entails spatial thinking skills and understanding systems in addition to content knowledge about locations and places.

Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 28, 2014 11:09 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the concepts of geo-literacy and spatial perspective because it indicates that for a population to be knowledgeable about geography, it must go above the mere rote memorization of toponyms and instead explore the spatial characteristics of places.

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A History of Conflicts

A History of Conflicts | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Browse the timeline of war and conflict across the globe.

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.     


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Sakis Koukouvis's comment, August 16, 2012 8:06 AM
Oh... You are lucky ;-)
Paul Rymsza's comment, August 22, 2012 2:15 PM
the potential of this site is amazing between the interactive learning system and the correlation between the timeline and location. If the human geography class is anything like this i can't wait for it!
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 28, 2013 3:34 PM

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.    

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Why Scale is Important

Discover why and how scale matters in geography education, with real-world examples using fieldwork, GIS, and much more. This video introduces the topic and ...

 

This is a sample Youtube clip from the 'geographyuberalles' channel which has over 800 videos produced by @josephkerski (NCGE president, Educational Manager at ESRI).  This is a great resource. 


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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, August 18, 2014 7:39 PM

Unit 1

 

Ellen Van Daele's curator insight, March 22, 2015 9:06 PM

This video expresses how important scale is and how different scales effect each other. Climate and the weather and effected by scales, you must know what the scale they are talking about is in order to know how precise the weather is. 

 

It talks about absolute and relative scale, and how they affect each other. It also discusses how a large scale a smaller size of land is than a small scale. The whole world would be a small scale map, whereas a city would be a large scale.