Urban Places
496 views | +0 today
Follow
Urban Places
The nature, character and spatial distribution of world cities and mega cities
Curated by L.Long
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by L.Long
Scoop.it!

The world loves Sydney. Australians aren’t that fussed

The world loves Sydney. Australians aren’t that fussed | Urban Places | Scoop.it
Each day an average of 129 people leave Sydney for elsewhere in Australia. Only 85 move the other way.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by L.Long
Scoop.it!

These Charts Show How Globalization Has Gone Digital

These Charts Show How Globalization Has Gone Digital | Urban Places | Scoop.it
Since last November, when the English singer Adele posted a track from her latest album, 25, on YouTube, she has sold more than
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Incredible growth of megacities

The Incredible growth of megacities | Urban Places | Scoop.it

"The world’s cities are booming and their growth is changing the face of the planet. Around 77 million people are moving from rural to urban areas each year. The latest UN World Cities Report has found that the number of “megacities” – those with more than 10 million people – has more than doubled over the past two decades, from 14 in 1995 to 29 in 2016. And whereas the developed world was once the home of the biggest cities, this map shows that it is now the developing world taking the lead."

 

Tags: urban, megacities, regions.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Carson Dean Williamson's curator insight, May 11, 2017 10:43 AM
This relates to our chapter by showing some facts on mega cities. Mega cities are metropolitan areas that have a high population. These cities are the definition of urban development around the world. There is currently 29 mega cities (since 2016) around the world. This article showed the growth of mega cities and urban development of the city.
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 19, 2017 10:25 AM
unit 7
Melih Pekyatirmaci's curator insight, May 20, 2017 7:31 PM
Share your insight
Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Sprawling Shanghai

Sprawling Shanghai | Urban Places | Scoop.it
If you could go back in time to the 1980s, you would find a city that is drastically different than today’s Shanghai.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 20, 2017 5:20 PM

This series of seven satellite images shows how quickly the economic development of China has impacted the urban sprawl of China's biggest cities.  Pictures of the downtown area's growth are impressive, but these aerial images show the full magnitude of the change. 

 

Tags: urbanremote sensing, megacities, China, urban ecology.

Mr Mac's curator insight, June 13, 2017 10:17 AM
Unit 7 - Urban Sprawl 
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, May 3, 10:12 PM
Shanghai os growing at an incredibly rapid rate. As more and more people begin to inhabit the city, the neighboring towns have morphed into one large city. However, the city's amazing population increase has taken a toll on its ecosystem. With the rapid growth, Shanghai's temperature has increased dramatically. Similarly, the wild and plant life has declined in the region as well.
Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Shrinking cities: the rise and fall of global urban populations – mapped

Shrinking cities: the rise and fall of global urban populations – mapped | Urban Places | Scoop.it

"The world is experiencing rapid urbanisation, but not every city is growing. Population is likely to decline in 17% of large cities in developed regions and 8% of cities across the world from 2015 to 2025, according to a McKinsey report."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 14, 2017 3:36 PM

This is a fantastic series of maps for human geography and regional geography classes. Some cities throughout Africa and Asia have experienced spectacular growth (click here for 5 infographics showing East Asia's massive urban growth).  Europe, on the other isn't see the same level of growth and is even experiencing urban decline in a few regions.   

 

Questions to Ponder: What patterns do you see in these maps?  What cultural, demographic and economic factors explain some of the regional patterns in these maps?        

 

Tags: APHG, urban, unit 7 cities, megacities.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 9, 2017 11:59 AM
unit 7
James Hardie's curator insight, April 17, 2017 9:12 PM

Geographical skills and concepts: place / space / scale / change 

Geographical knowledge: "Causes and consequences of urbanisation, drawing on a study from Indonesia, or another country of the Asia region (ACHGK054)" 

Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Ship to shore: tracking the maritime motorways

Ship to shore: tracking the maritime motorways | Urban Places | Scoop.it

"It is estimated that 97 per cent of all trade – the things we buy in shops – will have been transported in containers by ships at sea. The container vessel, stacked high with uniformly-sized metal boxes, has become a symbol of our globalized world. This is a world of imports and exports, a world where moving things across huge distances keeps the price of daily commodities low as items are manufactured in one place, then packaged in another, before arriving on the shores where they will eventually be sold. In recent geographical literature, attention has turned to the world at sea – a space traditionally overlooked. Geography means ‘Earth-writing’ and geographers have taken the origins of the term very seriously. They have written primarily about the Earth: the ground, the soil, the land. The sea is something ‘out there’ – seemingly disconnected from our everyday lives. However, an appreciation of the world as made from flows and connections has enabled geography to recognize that the sea is essential to our landed life." http://wp.me/p2Ij6x-5DS

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Ivan Ius's curator insight, February 19, 2017 3:38 PM
Geographic Concepts: Patterns and Trends, Geographic Perspective, Interrelationships
Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Drones and Geospatial Data

Without sophisticated sensor packages, drones would just be expensive RC airplanes. In this video, Avweb looks at some of the things they can carry.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 22, 2016 3:34 PM

This video gets deep into the specs of sensor packages and the commercial side of UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles), but it shows how emerging technologies are using and creating geographic data.  This is also a reminder that geography can be incredibly useful in a diverse range of economic sectors and has far-reaching applications in the real world--geography can be incredibly cutting edge.      

 

Tags: geospatial, video, technology.

Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

From megacity to metacity

From megacity to metacity | Urban Places | Scoop.it

In 1950, there were only two megacities, London and New York, with populations of more than 10m. In 2010, Tokyo was top of the list of the world’s largest cities, New York was only just scraping into the top 10, and London had dropped off the bottom. New York will join it in megacity oblivion in less than a decade and, with the exception of Tokyo, every other megacity will be in what is referred to as the 'global south'. To earn a place in the top 10, cities will soon need to boast a population of 20m or more. This is a new breed of city – the metacity."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 12, 2016 2:24 PM

The term megacity (a city with a population greater than 10 million) has been around for a while and there wasn't much linguistic need to describe something bigger.  Today, most megacities are more like Lagos and Mumbai, places of extreme wealth asymmetries than the global cities of New York City and London.  Some are now using the term metacity to describe cities with populations of 20 million.  Asian metacities are a good place to start thinking about the largest urban regions that are increasingly dominating economic, political and cultural affairs.      

 

Tags: urbanmegacities, unit 7 citiesEast Asia.

Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Ever-Expanding Slums

"Slums lack:

Permanent housingSufficient spaceClean waterSanitationPersonal safety
Via Seth Dixon
L.Long's insight:
World's Largest Slums
more...
Rebecca Geevarghese's curator insight, May 8, 2016 6:29 AM
Another GREAT resource to show to Geography students! 
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 2, 2016 12:29 AM

The liveability of urban slums in the developing world makes an interesting study linking access to services and facilities, community identity, social connectedness, environmental quality and safety. 

 

Follow an introduction to slums using this video clip and 8.11 with the following resources that investigate the impact of rapid urbanisation on the liveability of cities.

 

Slums are a consequence of urbanisation studied in more depth  in Changing Places (Stage 9) - consequences of urbanisation. Limit the study of slums to liveability issues in stage 4 or an introduction to factors influencing liveability. 

 

GeoWorld 7 NSW

Chapter 7: Liveability:Measurement and environmental factors 

7.6 Access to shelter

Chapter 8 Urban, rural and remote places

8.6 An urban world

8.7 Why go to town?

8.8 Large cities attract people

8.10 Skyscrapers and slums

8.11 Kibera slums and flying toilets

Geothink people live in cities - Figure 8.14.3

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 13, 2017 11:07 AM
unit 7
Rescooped by L.Long from Urban Places
Scoop.it!

Sydney's population touches 200,000 for first time

Sydney's population touches 200,000 for first time | Urban Places | Scoop.it

“The City of Sydney has near-doubled its population over the past two decades to 200,000 and is growing so fast that it will add a further 50,000 residents over the next 7 years, new city figures show.”


Via Lorraine Chaffer, Clare Kinnane, blmgeo
L.Long's insight:
Sydney; Future Growth
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by L.Long from Urban Places
Scoop.it!

Good health comes down to your postcode, your education and your income

Good health comes down to your postcode, your education and your income | Urban Places | Scoop.it
YOUR postcode, your education and your income can have as much influence on your health as your genes a conference in Canberra will be told today.

Via Sharon McLean, Clare Kinnane, blmgeo
L.Long's insight:
Sydney Social Patterns
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by L.Long from Urban Places
Scoop.it!

Why Parramatta is NSW's best suburb

Why Parramatta is NSW's best suburb | Urban Places | Scoop.it
As Parramatta is showing, good people are located in good places, creating the competitive edge for Sydney’s regional economy.

Via Sharon McLean, Clare Kinnane, blmgeo
L.Long's insight:
Sydney- Economic character & residential land 
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by L.Long from Urban Places
Scoop.it!

Get ready for a bulging Sydney

Get ready for a bulging Sydney | Urban Places | Scoop.it
Stand by for a Sydney of 8 million. And that’s just the moderate projection. The high projection is for a Sydney of 8.3 million and a Melbourne of 9.1 million by the middle of the century.

Via Clare Kinnane, blmgeo
L.Long's insight:
Future Growth Sydney
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by L.Long
Scoop.it!

These are Asia's cities to watch

These are Asia's cities to watch | Urban Places | Scoop.it
Across Asia, cities are turning to the world stage. These are the ones you need to know about.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by L.Long
Scoop.it!

The cities that run the world

The cities that run the world | Urban Places | Scoop.it
Sydney and Melbourne are often given global city status, but the two have some attributes which undermine their claims.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why do people and nations trade?

"Mark Blyth of Brown University explains international trade." 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 5, 2017 7:17 PM

To understand international trade, you need to understand how the factors of production vary from place to place, resulting in different locations having a comparative advantage on a global market.  This video nicely explains that with the example of Scotland’s comparative advantage raising sheep with southern Europe’s comparative advantage in producing wine.   Does the size of a country matter in trade?  You betcha.

 

Tags: regions, economic, diffusion, industry

Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Mexico City, Parched and Sinking, Faces a Water Crisis

Mexico City, Parched and Sinking, Faces a Water Crisis | Urban Places | Scoop.it

"A host of environmental factors are threatening to push a crowded capital toward a breaking point."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Danielle Yen's curator insight, March 3, 2017 8:45 AM

Urban ecology, environmental justice, gendered inequities, primate city politics, the struggle of growing megacities…it’s all here in this fantastic piece of investigative reporting.  The article highlights the ecological problems that Mexico City faces (high-altitude exacerbates air pollution, interior drainage worsens water pollution, limited aquifers that are overworked lead to subsidence, importing water outside of the basin requires enormous amounts of energy, etc.).  just because the article doesn't use the word 'geography' doesn't mean that it isn't incredibly geographic. All of these problems are at the heart of human-environmental nexus of 21st century urbanization. 

   

Tags: urban, megacities, water, environment, Mexico.

Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, February 8, 1:04 PM
(Mexico/Central America) Mexico city seems to be built in the worst way possible. The original Aztec architects could not imagine the locational problems the city faces today. Originally built on an island, Spanish conquerors drained the lakes and created an inland, mountainous position that causes the city to sink inches every year. Ironically, the city is now forced to use underground water sources or expensively import drinking water and poor locals can rarely count on tap water. The uneven clay and volcanic soil foundation and climate change further drives subsidence of this unplanned metropolis. Climate change will also create a series of floods and droughts and the inefficient sewage and water system will lead to devastation.
David Stiger's curator insight, September 21, 1:32 PM
The impending environmental disaster that Mexico  City faces is fast approaching. Urban sprawl has placed too much pressure on the environment. Its relentless pavement prevents the clay underneath the surface from absorbing water.  Mexico City is losing its potable drinking supply and the structures on top are sinking. This problem is only being made worse by climate change. 

As usual, this a problem that hurts poor people the most. Mexico City diverts water from surrounding towns, many of them struggling, to the metropolis. The wealthy and affluent are provided all the water they need at a fair price. Meanwhile, people inside and outside the city do not have enough water, must wait for their water on absurd schedules, and overpay. 

The sociological effects are even more alarming. Possibly 15 percent of the city's inhabitants may migrate from the city in search of better water resources. For a large city of 21 million people, that is a significant amount of migrants. Besides migrants, women suffer even more than men. Due to such an unreliable supply of clean drinking water, women must wait at home and manage the household's water problems. They are the family members responsible for collecting sufficient water. As a result, women are prevented from going to school or taking up careers. 

Mexico City's water problem is an equity problem. If the powerful and the wealthy were being adversely affected, maybe something drastic would be done to improve the situation. 


Scooped by L.Long
Scoop.it!

Living the high life

Living the high life | Urban Places | Scoop.it

Too many modern flats are samey and soulless. A new book celebrates the architects coming up with creative solutions for our overcrowded cities

L.Long's insight:
Creative responses to overcrowded cities 
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

China sends first freight train to London

China sends first freight train to London | Urban Places | Scoop.it
Time for a long trip along the new silk road.

 

The train is part of Chinese President Xi Jinping's vision for 'One Belt, One Road' -- dubbed by some as the new silk road. It's China's infrastructure initiative, which Xi hopes will improve China's economic ties with Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

 

Tags: regions, transportation, economic, globalization, diffusion, industry.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nicole Canova's curator insight, March 23, 11:21 PM
It is easy to see why this freight train is being called "the new silk road," with its similarities to ancient trade routes that brought spices, silks, and other goods to Europe for centuries.  It will strengthen the links China has with countries throughout Eurasia.  To what extent will it succeed?  How did the Chinese reach their decisions on which countries the train should pass through and which should be bypassed? What are the economic--and perhaps political--implications for China's relationships with nations completely bypassed by the freight train, such as India, Iran, Turkey, Ukraine, Italy, etc.?
James Piccolino's curator insight, March 24, 10:12 AM
I can see why this would be considered a new silk road. I think that this idea is a great one and works wonders for trade between many cultures and countries along the way.
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, May 3, 10:18 PM
This article briefly discusses the train that travels from China to London. By sending this freight train, the Chinese president hopes to take initiative in the infrastructure. The route has been compared to the silk Road that was used as means of trade many years ago.
Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The rise of the Asian megacity (and why 'metacities' are the next big thing)

The rise of the Asian megacity (and why 'metacities' are the next big thing) | Urban Places | Scoop.it

"Asia's rapid urbanisation is changing the very shape and nature of what we think of as a city.  It's not just the rapid increase in their numbers or their sheer size that makes these megacities fascinating. They look, feel and behave differently, too."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 12, 2016 2:29 PM

The term megacity (a city with a population greater than 10 million) has been around for a while and there wasn't much linguistic need to describe something bigger.  Today, most megacities are more like Lagos and Mumbai, places of extreme wealth asymmetries than the global cities of New York City and London.  Some are now using the term metacity to describe cities with populations of 20 million.  Asian metacities are a good place to start thinking about the largest urban regions that are increasingly dominating economic, political and cultural affairs.      

 

Tags: urbanmegacitiesEast Asia.

Lee Hancock's curator insight, November 1, 2016 8:48 PM

Mega city to Meta city...

Rescooped by L.Long from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

From megacity to metacity

From megacity to metacity | Urban Places | Scoop.it

In 1950, there were only two megacities, London and New York, with populations of more than 10m. In 2010, Tokyo was top of the list of the world’s largest cities, New York was only just scraping into the top 10, and London had dropped off the bottom. New York will join it in megacity oblivion in less than a decade and, with the exception of Tokyo, every other megacity will be in what is referred to as the 'global south'. To earn a place in the top 10, cities will soon need to boast a population of 20m or more. This is a new breed of city – the metacity."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 12, 2016 2:24 PM

The term megacity (a city with a population greater than 10 million) has been around for a while and there wasn't much linguistic need to describe something bigger.  Today, most megacities are more like Lagos and Mumbai, places of extreme wealth asymmetries than the global cities of New York City and London.  Some are now using the term metacity to describe cities with populations of 20 million.  Asian metacities are a good place to start thinking about the largest urban regions that are increasingly dominating economic, political and cultural affairs.      

 

Tags: urbanmegacities, unit 7 citiesEast Asia.

Rescooped by L.Long from Urban Places
Scoop.it!

The gap between the inner city and outer suburbs is growing

The gap between the inner city and outer suburbs is growing | Urban Places | Scoop.it
Inner city versus outer suburbs has been a perennial Australian divide. But the lifestyle differences between those located near our CBDs and those living towards the urban fringe are growing.

Via Clare Kinnane, blmgeo
L.Long's insight:
Sydney: social patterns
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by L.Long from Urban Places
Scoop.it!

Sydney's newest urban utopia

Sydney's newest urban utopia | Urban Places | Scoop.it

Jacksons Landing has been 16 years in the making. After 16 years of planning and building, Jacksons Landing, one of Australia's biggest waterfront residential redevelopments, is officially completed.

 


Via dilaycock, Sharon McLean, Clare Kinnane, blmgeo
L.Long's insight:
Sydney; Urban renewal - JL
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by L.Long from Urban Places
Scoop.it!

Sydney's urban growth history

Sydney's urban growth history | Urban Places | Scoop.it
Video: The expansion of built up urban land in Sydney (1808-2000), NYU Stern Urbanization Project The growth of Sydney's urban fringe, as well as that of other cities, has been documented recently ...

Via Sharon McLean, Clare Kinnane, blmgeo
L.Long's insight:
Sydney; Urban Sprawl
more...
No comment yet.