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Environment Agency probe into dead fish in Newsham Park lake - Liverpool Echo

Environment Agency probe into dead fish in Newsham Park lake - Liverpool Echo | Geography News | Scoop.it
Liverpool Echo
Environment Agency probe into dead fish in Newsham Park lake
Liverpool Echo
Environment Agency investigators are set to probe why fish keep being found dead in a popular Liverpool lake.
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Seaweed Blooms: A Growing Problem | Green Cities and Blue Waters

Seaweed Blooms: A Growing Problem | Green Cities and Blue Waters | Geography News | Scoop.it

When most people think of algae blooms, which are rapid increases in algal biomass, something like green slime or pond scum is what usually comes to mind. Often unsightly, and sometimes even dangerous, algal blooms are making more news as we learn more about their implications for human and ecosystem health. Most stories focus on blooms of phytoplankton that cause outbreaks of amnesiac or paralytic shellfish poisonings, red tide (associated with a certain dinoflagellate and not, as is popularly assumed, red algae) or events like the recent cyanobacterial bloom in Lake Erie. Also very common, but usually receiving less attention are blooms of macroalgae, which you know as seaweeds.

 

Seaweed blooms are caused for the most part by the same factors as their smaller, microalgal cousins: increases in light availability, temperatures and nutrient levels; though these events can occur naturally, they are increasingly the result of human activity. Seaweed blooms are obviously a nuisance to recreational beach users, where washed up algae often rot, attracting insects and emitting noxious odors. They can have more far-reaching effects such as contributing to hypoxia, outcompeting native seaweeds other local organisms, and emitting of noxious fumes. In 2009 a horse famously died on a “green tide” covered beach in France after inhaling an excess of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a byproduct of seaweed decomposition; two years later nearly three dozen wild boars succumbed to H2S poisoning a few miles away.

 

Since 2007, the coast of Qingdao, China has seen increasingly massive blooms of Ulva—commonly known as sea lettuce. Last year’s bloom was spread over 11,000 miles and represents the largest macroalgal bloom on record (for reference, that’s about twice the size of Connecticut). This blog’s cover photo shows Qingdao’s bloom in 2013. Tractors were later used to clear away the sometimes waist-deep accumulations. More photos here.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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