Geography in the classroom
10.4K views | +4 today
Follow
Geography in the classroom
Resources to support the NSW secondary Geography curriculum
Curated by dilaycock
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by dilaycock
Scoop.it!

Why do refugees get on boats?

Why do refugees get on boats? | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

Indonesia is the last country of departure of most of the asylum seekers who arrive in Australia by boat. At the end of 2007, a team of researchers commenced a research project looking at the circumstances of asylum seekers and refugees in Indonesia.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by dilaycock
Scoop.it!

Darfur Is Dying - Play mtvU's Darfur refugee game for change

Darfur Is Dying - Play mtvU's Darfur refugee game for change | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Darfur is Dying is mtvU's game for change about the genocide in the Darfur region of Sudan. Play now and find ways to get involved to help stop this human rights and humanitarian crisis.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by dilaycock
Scoop.it!

Household income quartiles - Pyrmont - City of Sydney Community Profile

Household income quartiles - Pyrmont - City of Sydney Community Profile | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

Income quartiles allow us to compare relative income-earning capabilities across time. Analysis of the distribution of households by income quartile in Pyrmont compared to the Sydney Statistical Division shows that there was larger proportion of households in the highest income quartile, but a smaller proportion in the lowest income quartile.The most significant change in Pyrmont between 2001 and 2006 was in the Highest group quartile which showed an increase of 448 households.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by dilaycock
Scoop.it!

Sydney Streets - Then & Now Gallery

Sydney Streets - Then & Now Gallery | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

Comparison of historic street vistas with contemporary photographs of the same views.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by dilaycock
Scoop.it!

Emerald City has its own individual sparkle

Emerald City has its own individual sparkle | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

People do things differently in Sydney. Australia's 16th national census,  released this week, revealed a city with a host of unique demographic  attributes.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by dilaycock
Scoop.it!

Watch Toxic: Amazon Online | smh.tv

Watch Toxic: Amazon Online | smh.tv | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"As the investigation into Ze and Maria's murders went nowhere, we drove into the forest to the site of the killings, followed the heavily armed men of Brazil's environmental protection agency as they busted up illegal timber mills, visited the militant squatters of Brazil's Landless Movement, met modern day slaves, and marveled at the lawless, violent atmosphere that permeates the town locals call Marabala (that means Mara-bullets)."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by dilaycock
Scoop.it!

Watch environment Online | smh.tv

Watch environment Online | smh.tv | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

Watch videos on environmental issues  from Australia and around the world, all online, and all completely free.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by dilaycock
Scoop.it!

Refugee populations across the globe: the facts

Refugee populations across the globe: the facts | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"The global refugee situation is constantly changing as wars come and go and persecution waxes and wanes."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by dilaycock
Scoop.it!

Commitment to restoring damaged forests

Commitment to restoring damaged forests | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
The United States, Rwanda and a coalition of Brazilian groups on Monday vowed to restore at least 18 million hectares (45 million acres) of damaged forests.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by dilaycock
Scoop.it!

Poorest countries may adapt better to climate change

Poorest countries may adapt better to climate change | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"The poorest societies may be more able to adapt to the threat that climate change poses to food supplies than their slightly richer peers."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by dilaycock
Scoop.it!

Australia creates world's largest marine reserve network

Australia creates world's largest marine reserve network | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Australia has created the world's largest network of marine reserves and will restrict fishing as well as oil and gas exploration in a major step to safeguard the environment and access to food.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by dilaycock
Scoop.it!

Australia to create world's biggest marine reserve

Australia to create world's biggest marine reserve | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"Australia will create the largest network of marine parks in the world, protecting waters covering an area as large as India while banning oil and gas exploration and limiting commercial fishing in some of the most sensitive areas."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by dilaycock
Scoop.it!

Balancing population growth and resources

Balancing population growth and resources | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"The attainment of 7 billion world citizens is cause for both optimism and concern."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by dilaycock
Scoop.it!

Huge shift in what we eat

Huge shift in what we eat | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

Our diet will see more dramatic change in the coming decades than at any time in our history

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by dilaycock
Scoop.it!

Mr Cronin's Classroom - Urban Growth and Decline in Pyrmont-Ultimo

Mr Cronin's Classroom - Urban Growth and Decline in Pyrmont-Ultimo | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

A Geography teacher's blog unit on urban growth and decline in Pyrmont-Ultimo (Year 10 Geography).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by dilaycock
Scoop.it!

History of Pyrmont & Ultimo

As with many crossroads throughout the world from time immemorial, ready access to shipping, road and rail transport predestined commerce and industry to become the backbone of the Pyrmont peninsula.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by dilaycock
Scoop.it!

Photos reveal the past - Land and Property Information

Photos reveal the past - Land and Property Information | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

Obtaining aerial photos from different periods can be a useful way to research the history of an area or to verify different uses of land over time. Photos below demonstrate how Breakfast Point in Sydney has changed over a 60 year period.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dilaycock from Regional Geography
Scoop.it!

These 600-Year Old World Heritage Sites Might Be Rubble by August

These 600-Year Old World Heritage Sites Might Be Rubble by August | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"An extremist group has seized the African city of Timbuktu, systematically destroying its monuments."  Recently, various groups have claimed the historic region in Mali, one group even declaring it a breakaway state, but currently the extremeist group Ansar Dine is in control and in the process of destroying some of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites there.  They deem the shrines, mosques and early universities as sacrilegious and tourism to be "debauchery". 


Via Allison Anthony, Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by dilaycock
Scoop.it!

Watch A Worm in the Apple Online | smh.tv

Watch A Worm in the Apple Online | smh.tv | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
The world believes the image of Tasmania is one of unspoilt wilderness, but deforestation is having a severe impact on the island.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by dilaycock
Scoop.it!

Portrait of a population: what the Australian Census found

Portrait of a population: what the Australian Census found | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
AUSTRALIA BY NUMBERS: The Australian Bureau of Statistics has released the first batch of its 2011 census data.
more...
Lamar Ewing White III's comment, August 23, 2012 6:02 PM
So when I read this article only 2 things really stood out to me. The first thing I noticed was that everybody lives on the coast. It seemed like no body lives in central Australia which makes me wonder what makes up the majority of the country/continent. Forest? I don't blame Australians for living on the coast tho. I'm sure it's as beautiful as heaven. Ironically the next thing I noticed was the lack of religion. 22% are atheist which seems like a high percentage to me. Of course I'm not judging or telling them how to live, I just find it interesting they aren't really big into religion.
Scooped by dilaycock
Scoop.it!

Tackling global disease threats

Tackling global disease threats | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
In part eight of our multi-disciplinary Millennium Project series, Martyn Jeggo argues that we must search the animal world for clues if we are to react in time against the rise of new and emerging viruses…...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by dilaycock
Scoop.it!

Palm oil for India 'destroying Indonesian forests'

Palm oil for India 'destroying Indonesian forests' | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

"Surging demand for palm oil in India for cooking and everyday grocery items is driving tropical forest destruction in Indonesia, Greenpeace said Tuesday."

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dilaycock from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Unexpected Consequences of climate change

Unexpected Consequences of climate change | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

Climate change has numerous casualities: the melting of the Arctic Sea ice is one such environment nightmare that's a result of global warming. But like all global processes, not all places are impacted equally.  Even in an economic recession, some find fortune while the majority flounder.  Same is true with the melting of the Artic; the melting might potentially opening up the fabled Northwest Passage and create new, seasonal shipping lanes.  Who would benefit from this?  Who would suffer?  To see a short video on this, see: http://www.economist.com/blogs/dailychart/2011/09/melting-arctic-sea-ice-and-shipping-routes  


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dilaycock from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Africa Takes Off

Africa Takes Off | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

Ask this question: Which region of the world currently is the home to 6 of the 10 fastest growing economies?  Most people (myself included) would be surprised to hear that the region is sub-Saharan Africa.  While Sub-Saharan Africa is still the least economically developed region with some very significant challenges, too often Africa is only taught as a region of problems and negative patterns.  

 

Trade between Africa and the rest of the world has tripled in the last decade.  Since 2005, Africa is officially receiving more private foreign investment than official aid.  With many counties "skipping the landline phase" and going straight to cell phone technologies, the rapid acceleration of technology means that they Africa's economic infrastructure has the potential to increase quickly.      


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dilaycock from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Earth As Art

Earth As Art | Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

The USGS is celebrating 40 years of the LANDSAT

Program by having a competition to select the top 5 "Earth as Art" images from the more than 120 scenes from their curated collection.  Even if you don't vote, the images are spectacular and great examples of the Earth's physical landscape.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 6, 2012 8:11 PM
Really shows the natural beauty of the world through our technology.