Geography ideas
6 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Cathleen Griffin Smythe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Who Owns Antarctica?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Blake Joseph's curator insight, April 24, 2015 3:48 PM

With Antarctica being the coldest, driest, and most isolated continent on earth, it is surprising that 51 different countries own pieces of land on it. As of now, the lands there can only be used strictly for scientific research, but I presume that treaty will not be in effect forever. Hidden resources yet to be discovered and future technology and is bound to give us some reason to permanently settle in this barren land someday. Discovering oil or minerals would be a good bet, as it was a leading factor in causing Dubai to form in the Arabian Desert, or the city of Perth in Western Australia. A healthy fishing industry could even help support future economies there. While weather has always been an important factor in human colonization, it does not make a place totally inhospitable. If economies can form in places like Barrow, Alaska and Longyearbyen, Norway, I don't see future  settlements in Antarctica as an impossibility.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 25, 2015 5:20 PM

In reality, no one own Antarctica for now. However, it is governed under the Antarctica treaty of 1959.  There are a few reasons why no one has been claimed Antarctica, one being that is has extremely cold temperatures that drop to -122 °F. The continent also has a vast amount of thick ice that is 3 miles deep and covers its surface. In addition, it would be very costly to explore these regions and difficult to build infrastructure and transport food due to the cold temperatures and frozen seas. The Antarctica treaty of 1959 is an international agreement which states that no one cannot own the Antarctica. However, some countries have claimed some part of Antarctica. These designated areas are only to be used for scientific research purposes. Also, since an international agreement has been putted in place, Antarctica cannot be used for military purposes. The agreement also stresses freedom of scientific investigation but prohibits nuclear testing and waste disposal in Antarctica. This research has helped scientists discover new truths about global problems, climate change, and geology. 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 2015 4:16 PM

It will be interesting to see what happens to Antartica as the climate shifts and continues to get warmer.  What is under the frozen tundra?  Will it be something of a natural resource or mineral?  I think this is when the fight will get real about the slice of pie and how much each has.  

Rescooped by Cathleen Griffin Smythe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

If all the Ice melted: National Geographic's Interactive map on Rising Seas

If all the Ice melted: National Geographic's Interactive map on Rising Seas | Geography ideas | Scoop.it

What if all the ice melted in the world? Now whether you believe global warming happens because of human activities or naturally is another debate. The questions “How would the world look if ALL the ice melted?” How much would the sea rise by? What would be the average temperature on Earth? are of interest to everyone.

Trust National Geographic not only to capture such questions in the best manner possible but also to visualize it in such geoawesome manner! Here’s the super interesting map by National Geographic “IF ALL THE ICE MELTED“!

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, National Geographic, climate change, water, visualization.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, April 5, 2015 9:05 AM

Climate change is all about the "Pendulum Effect," where the extremes is what matters, not so much the median or average. The average may fluctuate some, but the real problem comes when the weather goes haywire. Too much water can be as destructive as too little water, and this doesn't only happen in time but in space as well, where regions get too much of one and too little of the other. We'll see strips of drought and strips of wetness, strips of cold and strips of heat, like bands across regions and across the planet. If he ice melts, the sea and fresh water strips in the ocean will keep the fresh water atop and it'll probably freeze in great bands in winter and provoke an extreme albedo effect cooling down the planet radically followed immediately by a potential mini ice age.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, April 5, 2015 9:23 PM

Impact of climate change on landforms and landscapes 


The human causes and effects of landscape degradation (ACHGK051)

The ways of protecting significant landscapes (ACHGK052)



Rescooped by Cathleen Griffin Smythe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Road from Europe to U.S.? Russia proposes superhighway

Road from Europe to U.S.? Russia proposes superhighway | Geography ideas | Scoop.it
London to New York City by car? It could happen if the head of Russian Railways has his way.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Taylor Doonan's curator insight, March 15, 3:16 PM
A road from London to Alaska sounds crazy, but Russia is proposing it. A multi-national highway spanning from London through Europe, into Russia, across Siberia across the Bering Strait into Alaska. There are not many details yet, but Russia is proposing this highway, but there are a lot of hiccups in the way that need to get sorted out. 
Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, March 15, 3:42 PM
(Russia) In a world of globalization, this considered highway could make the world a little smaller. The Trans-Eurasian Belt Development project intends to create a road alongside the Trans-Siberian Railway, crossing all of Russia to link with roads spanning throughout Europe and connecting to North America through Alaska. The head of Russian Railways did not explain how the road would cross the Bering Strait. There are 55 miles between Russia and Alaska at the narrowest point, and one consecutive bridge would still be half the length of the longest bridge in the world. It is definitely doable. Linking to roads in Alaska and across the continent, a trip from London to New York could be about 12,910 miles, all by car. The road network would apparently pay for itself with weighty economic promise, however Russian Railways provided no information on this financial promise.

The highway would connect most of the world, but tense relations between Russia and the US and Europe could hinder progress. Additionally, the road would cost trillions of dollars, take a very long time, and require frequent maintenance, especially across seldom traveled regions in Siberia.
brielle blais's curator insight, March 29, 5:20 PM
This showcases how the geography of the world can be linked together to grow the economic stability of each country through easier access to products and goods. By creating the trans-siberean highway, Russia would be connected to the United States by their western coast. This allows access for places once very difficult to travel too. 
Rescooped by Cathleen Griffin Smythe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

200 years of immigration to the U.S., visualized

200 years of immigration to the U.S., visualized | Geography ideas | Scoop.it

"Where have immigrants to the U.S. come from? Natalia Bronshtein, a professor and consultant who runs the blog Insightful Interaction, created this fascinating visualization of the number of immigrants to the U.S. since 1829 by country of origin.  The graph hints at tragic events in world history. The first influx of Irish occurred during the potato famine in 1845, while the massive influx of Russians in the first decade of the 20th Century was driven by anti-Semitic violence of the Russian pogroms (riots). Meanwhile in the Austro-Hungarian Empire, army conscription and the forced assimilation of minority groups drove people to the U.S. in the early 1900s.  Since WWII, Central and South America and Asia have replaced Europe as the largest source of immigrants to the U.S. Immigration shrunk to almost nothing as restrictions tightened during WWII, and then gradually expanded to reach its largest extent ever in the first decade of the 21st Century."

 

Tags: migration, historical, USA, visualization.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
David Holoka's curator insight, September 8, 2015 9:36 AM

The statistics in this article shocked me. I already new America took in a large number of immigrants, but I thought most came illegally from Mexico. Instead, the immigrants we hold are very diverse in ethnicity.  

Mrs. Madeck's curator insight, October 1, 2015 5:56 PM

Migration

Fred Issa's curator insight, October 5, 2015 4:24 PM

We tend to forget that the first real Americans were the Native American Indians. Immigration is a hotly discussed topic right now, but I wonder where we would be as a nation, if the original Native Americans told the settlers at Roanoke Island, the Chesapeake, and Plymouth Rock, that no, we are not allowing any foreigners to settle on our shores and land. Food for thought. Fred Issa,

Rescooped by Cathleen Griffin Smythe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Can You Name the 10 Smallest Countries in the World?

Can You Name the 10 Smallest Countries in the World? | Geography ideas | Scoop.it

"A photo gallery of the world's ten smallest countries, from 0.2 square miles on up to 115 square miles, these ten smallest countries are microstates."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Zohair Ahmed's curator insight, March 23, 2015 2:41 AM

This picture slide show has to do with microstates, which are states or terratories that are both small in population and in size. These microstates are mostly near the sea, or even islands. Microstates have both pros and cons. Pros include having an abundant buffer zone: the sea. Another pro would be being alone, or isolated, (sometimes) this makes them free from other countries, which can be a pro and a con. A con may be that the country may have a harder time accessing fresh water, and improving agriculture with little land. Unit 4 deals with Microstates. 

 

Microstates are discussed in Unit 4, and all of these are examples of Microstates. Microstates have many pros and cons listed above.

Samuel Meyer's curator insight, March 23, 2015 11:53 AM

Pitcairn Island

Vatican City

Sovereign Military Order of Malta

San Marino

Monaco

Andorra

South Ossetia

Singapore

Transdniesteia

Bahrain

 

Just a few guesses...

 

Connor Hendricks's curator insight, March 23, 2015 4:35 PM

This shows that the world is made up of several countries of different origins. people on this small island nation could have lived there for centuries. this is a goodway to show how diverse the world is.

Scooped by Cathleen Griffin Smythe
Scoop.it!

Wargaming: computerized scenario planning

Stratfor conducted extensive scenario planning when considering Russia's offensive military options toward Ukraine. In this video some of the broader themes and deduction will be examined.
more...
Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, March 17, 2015 4:24 PM

Scooped by eth Dixon
onto Rhode Island Geography Education Alliance

Daniel Rasmus's curator insight, March 19, 2015 6:37 PM

Interesting exploration of what Russia might do in Eastern Europe. Great examples of scenario planning - facts and how things might work. Eliminate the impossible and reveal the real options.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 25, 2015 9:05 PM

Technology can be useful when designing strategies and making political decisions when war hits countries. War-gaming can be helpful for Ukraine and even for Russian governments on how to refine their military and political strategies during war. It simulates the question &what if& and can be tested without being hazardous for any one. In fact, war-gaming integrates all possibilities of how and what things can be done and also can narrow to a few options. Computerized animation models help and allow for the construction and display of a lot of options of how things can be done and what can not be. War-gaming can even be useful in predicting what may be happen in the near future.

Rescooped by Cathleen Griffin Smythe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Worldwide Country Comparison

Worldwide Country Comparison | Geography ideas | Scoop.it

"MyLifeElsewhere allows you to compare your home country with different countries around the world. Ever wonder what your life would be like if you were born somewhere else?"


Via Seth Dixon
more...
HG Académie de Rennes's curator insight, January 31, 2015 1:56 AM

Un site d'une grande simplicité d'utilisation bien qu'en anglais. Le principe est de choisir deux pays dans un menu déroulant pour en comparer les principaux indicateurs de développement sous la forme de petites infographies très pédagogiques.
La comparaison est évidemment un processus de raisonnement à mettre en place pour situer et caractériser en géographie. On songera ainsi à l'utilisation d'un tel outil dans le cadre de l'étude des inégalités de développement en classe de 5e et de Seconde, mais aussi pour une mise en perspective sur les Territoires dans la mondialisation en classe de 4e afin de caractériser un PMA, un pays émergent, un pays développé (cf. exemple réalisé pour l'illustration).

Dernière information sur ce site, les statistiques utilisées proviennent des bases de données open source de la CIA américaine.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, February 7, 2015 7:51 PM

After studying this comparison tool and using it to find the best of the best and worst of the worst, I picked out some highlights I'd like to share. Monaco is clearly the place to be born, earn, and live. When compared to the USA, the infant mortality rate is 71% less, the life expectancy is 10 years longer @ 84, and you'll earn 62% more money, no doubt because you have ten more years in which to do so. I believe the stats may be skewed a bit in this country comparison as the very rich live there and they have access to the best medical care, and probably don't have very many infants with them when they make the move from elsewhere, hence the low infant mortality rate. Austria is not a bad second choice as you are 33% less likely to be unemployed. On a sobering note, the life expectancy if you live in Namibia is only 52! Yikes, I'm already 53... It's far worse however in Swaziland. The life expectancy is sadly only 50.5 years and you are 44 times more likely to have AIDS than if you lived here. 26.5% of the population has AIDS! Be thankful for where you live and stop complaining, it's far worse on average in nearly all other countries.

Monika Fleischmann's curator insight, February 15, 2015 4:59 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

Did you know that with 1/30th the territory of the United States, Norway still has over 25% more coastline?  I didn't either until I compared Norway to the United States using My Life Elsewhere.  This site is designed allow United States students to imagine how their lives might be different if they were born in a different part of the world.  Students would probably die 21 years earlier if they were born in Liberia and 11 times more likely to have died in infancy.   Students would be 43.8% less likely to grow up and be unemployed and have 36.3% less babies if they were born in Taiwan.  This side-by-side format is a great way to help students help make these statistics real and meaningful.  One major drawback: this site only allows users to compare a country to the United States.  If you prefer to have students compare, say Cuba to the United Arab Emirates, I would recommend that you try If It Where My Home. 


Rescooped by Cathleen Griffin Smythe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Speed Burden [Costs of Sprawl]

The Speed Burden [Costs of Sprawl] | Geography ideas | Scoop.it
The need for speed devours huge chunks of American cities and leaves the edges of the expressways worthless. Busy streets, for almost all of human history, created the greatest real estate value because they delivered customers and clients to the businesses operating there. This in turn cultivated the highest tax revenues in town, both from higher property taxes and from elevated sales taxes. But you can't set up shop on the side of an expressway. How can cities afford to spend so much to create thoroughfares with no adjoining property value?

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Alexa Earl's curator insight, March 14, 2015 10:48 AM

This blog really made me realize what an impact humans are to the environment. They compare different cities and talk about the impacts and it really showed me how humans have built up cities.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 21, 2015 6:12 PM

A side by side comparison at first blush is striking but the devil is in the details. Florence, Italy is a city of only 368,000 while the Atlanta metro area is about 4.5 million. Agree that sprawl is ineffective real estate and efficiency wise, but fuel prices may be having a counter effect on the reduction of sprawl. It is much less expensive to commute given the price of oil at its current levels and the millennials will have a say in this urban sprawl contracting or expanding. Many do not own cars, relying on commuter systems within the city to get around. This in theory should drive down demand for fossil fuels, culminating in reduced prices for gasoline. If the infrastructure is already built, was is the cost to maintain it, given the static population of the large metro areas? Interesting to see how this plays out.

Kristina Lemson's curator insight, April 16, 2016 10:38 PM
This post is interesting for us given the massive Mitchell Freeway and Wanneroo Rd  development just north of Banksia Grove. How do you think this perspective adds to the issues you could discuss in your project report? 
Rescooped by Cathleen Griffin Smythe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Peru Is Indignant After Greenpeace Makes Its Mark on Ancient Site

Peru Is Indignant After Greenpeace Makes Its Mark on Ancient Site | Geography ideas | Scoop.it
A sign urging environmental action during a United Nations summit meeting on climate change was placed near a 1,000-year-old geoglyph that is a cultural treasure in Peru.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Chris Costa's curator insight, September 28, 2015 11:25 AM

People make mistakes with the best of intentions, and this is certainly a case of just that. Greenpeace hoped to make a lasting impression on world leaders by creating a powerful symbol illustrating the need for the world's leaders to embark on a policy of environmental conservatism; instead, they insulted the Peruvian government and desecrated a national heritage site. I feel like something like this would never have happened in a powerful Western nation; could you imagine the outrage if a historical site like the location of the Battle of Gettysburg or Jefferson's home of Monticello had been altered in such a away? Or if this sign had been hung from Big Ben or the Eiffel Tower? I feel like this group completely disregarded the sensitivities of the Peruvian government because it is only a "middle power," a nation that could easily be trumped by the group's ambitions- in short, that the nations concerns did not matter because it was "only" Peru. I find that train of thought extremely insulting and dangerous within the context of international relations- if smaller nations can be disregarded so easily in Western circles, what does that say for the future of global politics? An apology and, more importantly, a restoration project are in order, and Peru is right to demand them. I, too, would be insulted by Greenpeace's actions.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 12:23 PM

an environmental group disturbing on of the regions where man has been banned from going is insane. how do you justify defacing one of the last truly pristine places on earth, where people haven't walked for centuries, for the sake of some Eco-terrorism. did you not think through the response that this act would inspire, and if so, how did you become so dense?

David Stiger's curator insight, September 23, 3:03 PM
Climate change is a pressing issue, but after this escapade in Peru, it's clear that tact and respect must come first in communicating environmental dangers. Greenpeace thought it would get its message across by trespassing onto a fragile and sacred heritage site and spell out their message in big, bold letters. Although the activists probably possessed well meaning intentions, their effort to express the dangers of a rapidly changing climate revealed a blatant disregard for the rights of the land's inhabitants.  Ironically, Greenpeace harmed the environment. It would be as if a pacifist physically beat someone up to get their arguments across. 

It is commendable that Peru is standing up for itself. After suffering the degrading mark upon their heritage site they are refusing to accept an apology until Greenpeace has figured out a way to repair the damage. The harm done to the ancient Nazca hummingbird, however, may actually be irreparable because the site was in such a fragile condition. If the damage is irreparable, Greenpeace will probably have to pay fines in damages and potentially send the 12 activists back to stand trial. 

 
Rescooped by Cathleen Griffin Smythe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Industrial Revolution--Urban Game

Industrial Revolution--Urban Game | Geography ideas | Scoop.it
"Each student should have a large piece of butcher block paper (15x20).  They should use a pencil for this activity (color pencils are optional).Using the template provided, each student should mak...

Via Seth Dixon
more...
jada_chace's curator insight, January 12, 2015 9:49 AM

Playing the game allows students to make their own villages and plan how their industries will work. As they start to build their own town they have to consider where to place the stores and where to place the factories. Putting these structures into certain places can affect the student’s town.

Emily Bian's curator insight, May 22, 2015 9:44 AM

This was the game we played in class!!!

I really enjoyed this game and highly recommend it to future APHUG students because it was fun, informative, and FUN. It really helped me understand how England got really crowded all of the sudden due to the Industrial Revolution. It was a sudden urban sprawl with no  urban planning. My map/ city was a complete mess! 

I hope this game continues to be played as it is a fun introduction to the chaos of the Industrial Revolution. 

Campbell Ingraham's curator insight, May 25, 2015 2:57 PM

We played this game in our APHUG class. It really simulated how urban development exploded in the industrial revolution. It gives an explanation as to why urban planners at the time had poor design choices because they had little time to plan. They also didn't account for future population growth or new developments in technology. It really shows why today's older cities have poorer designs and more traffic. 

 

This article relates to the Industrial Revolution. It shows the population explosions which occurred as a result and the increased technology during the time. All of these factors of the industrial revolution in England contributed to the quick and poorly designed English cities which led to population overflow. These city planners could not have predicted what would happen or how to plan for more people. They also limited time, money, and resources, as the population just continued to grow and grow. 

Rescooped by Cathleen Griffin Smythe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Geoffrey West: The surprising math of cities and corporations - YouTube

http://www.ted.com Physicist Geoffrey West has found that simple, mathematical laws govern the properties of cities -- that wealth, crime rate, walking speed...

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Built 4 Betterness Ed van den Berg's curator insight, December 14, 2014 3:17 PM

Not surprisingly the DNA of cities is a follow-up of human DNA and understanding this will explain and predict how the body of a city will develop!

SRA's curator insight, April 16, 2015 2:10 AM

The idea that cities are just organisms that are satisfying the laws of biology is interesting. Especially because Physicist Geoffrey West brings the idea of Scalability which by definition is, the ability of a system, network, or process to handle a growing amount of work in a capable manner or its ability to be enlarged to accommodate that growth. What’s mind blowing to me is that the system that is referred to here is human interaction.  We create these cities through our interaction and experience. With a growth rate of 1,000,000 people every year the math adds up to an agreeable 15% rise in income levels, patents, and super creative people every year which is undoubted a win for civilization and society. But with that we must keep in mind also this means a 15% increase in things like deadly disease, crime, poverty, and ecological issues leading to further degradation of our planet. This unbounded growth means the system is destined to collapse. The math behind cities doesn't lie if we don’t prepare cities have a fate to die like every other organism in Biology. So it is up to us to create and innovate to sustain this growth and avoid the collapse. But we must do so at a forever increasing pace. Which subsequently is also part of another system predetermined to collapse. What I mean is what happens when we cannot innovate fast enough to sustain this growth?


- Caleb Beckett

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:14 AM

While corporations rise and fall, it is quite rare for a city to entirely fail as an economic system.  Huge cities have some negative consequences, but the networks that operate in the city function more efficiently on economies of scale in a way that offsets the negatives.  Increasing a city's population will continue to improve the economies of scale (larger cities have higher wages per capita, more creative employment per capita, etc.).  However, this growth requires major technological innovations to sustain long-term growth.  

 

Tags: urban, planning, megacities, industry, economic, scale, TED, video.

Rescooped by Cathleen Griffin Smythe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Incredible images capture dazzling symmetry of Iran's mosques

Incredible images capture dazzling symmetry of Iran's mosques | Geography ideas | Scoop.it
Self-taught Iranian photographer gains rare access to shoot religious buildings as they've never been seen.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 2015 4:25 PM

Showing the sacred spaces of Islam and how they are designed around the world. 

Lena Minassian's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:47 PM

This was one of my favorite articles. We usually are very used to seeing negative sides to the Middle East and this gave it a different spin. This shows breathtaking pictures of the Mosques in Iran. This architecture isn't like anything I've seen with all of the symmetry and colors. These photos were taken by a student and were not easily taken. You have to have an eye to capture moments like this and pictures like this are not always appreciated. the detail that went into creating and designing these mosques are really special and I would love to actually see something like this in person. 

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 2015 4:03 PM

Amazing photos of these mosques.  The detail and color in some of these mosques are extraordinary.  This kind of brilliance in color is something that is unexpected in this part of the world where everything seems to be so bland and alike in color or style.  Its surprising that the mosques don't let professional take pictures with certain equipment inside but let tourists take photos.  I would understand if the light from a camera could cause damage to the art, but these are the people who will be able to share these beautiful pictures with the rest of the world and show that there is more to Iran than what the outside may think.

Rescooped by Cathleen Griffin Smythe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

One Place, Two Names

One Place, Two Names | Geography ideas | Scoop.it
The government of the People’s Republic of China calls the country’s westernmost region Xinjiang, but the people who have lived there for centuries refer to their home as Eastern Turkistan. Many times when two groups do not refer to a place by the same name, it points to a cultural or political conflict, as is the case here.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:45 PM

it seems that this a a recurring theme with china. disputed lands surround this country inside and out, they claim to own all of it as well. but when the people that live their claim to be independent and choose not to associate themselves with you than it creates and interesting dynamic.

James Piccolino's curator insight, March 24, 9:52 AM
Very interesting. I am curious to know where this will lead to. There is something also unnerving about how most of us are never taught this in public schools even though it is a very big and very important topic. I can not image there being a split eventually over time, though there is no way that this area will stay as they are with the treatment of their government. This is surely a region to keep an eye on.
othni lindor's curator insight, October 20, 4:06 AM
This article talks about how the "government of the People’s Republic of China calls the country’s westernmost region Xinjiang, but the people who have lived there for centuries refer to their home as Eastern Turkistan." Usually when two groups or more have different names for the same place there is a political or cultural conflict happening in that country. 
Rescooped by Cathleen Griffin Smythe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Non-Native American Nations Control over North America

Non-Native American Nations Control over North America | Geography ideas | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Alex Lewis's curator insight, April 6, 2015 10:00 AM

This animated photo shows the progression of the different nations in control of North America. The development of the U.S. is also depicted on here, as they went from mostly European control to independence. While the U.S. controlled most of what is now America, you can recognize the Civil War period by the control of Confederate States. 

 

                                        -A.L.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, April 8, 2015 1:33 PM

Wow. As a history major, I found this map timeline really interesting and really cool. It's a great example of how even though the physical geography of a place can remain the same, its political and economic geography can change so rapidly (or not so rapidly). It was especially interesting to see the brief stints that entities such as the Republic of the Rio Grande or the Confederate States of America did in the dividing up of North America over the last two and a half centuries. For someone who knows nothing about U.S. history, those blips on the radar beg the question, "what happened there?" How can a political entity encompass a geographic region and then disappear just as quickly?

 

And that ties into what I think this map is really about: colonialism. This map says a great deal about how European (or Western) empires carved up the New World and what some of their political or economic goals were in the times that the map shows. It's also important to note the title of the map: "Non-Native American Nations Control over North America". So as we see the map changing to show European or United States expansion, what we DON'T see is the gradual loss of land experienced by the various Native American tribes that inhabited the continent long before Europeans ever laid eyes on it. This map, therefore, highlights how political and economic geography can change so drastically when groups with a lot of economic, political, and military power are at odds with groups who are severely disadvantaged in these areas. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 17, 2015 9:00 AM

This map is an excellent resource in show the evolution of colonial claims to North America.. It is fascinating to watch all the political changes that have occurred on the continent in over the past 500 years. The biggest change is the evolutions of the United Sates from a small city state like nation to an empire on both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. This is also an extremely sad story to be told from this map. The loss and destruction of Native Americans is next to slavery is  the greatest sin of America. This map tells the complex story of our Continent.  

Rescooped by Cathleen Griffin Smythe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Roam the World in (Almost) Real Time

Roam the World in (Almost) Real Time | Geography ideas | Scoop.it
A groundbreaking Mapbox project ushers in a new era for online cartography.

 

On Google Earth, the seasons rarely change. Most anywhere a digital traveler goes, the sky is cloudless and the grass is green. No snow on the ground in Iowa. No fire in Valparaiso. It's a big gap between the world as it is and as it's mapped.

Launched Thursday,a landmark project from Mapbox has changed the summertime paradigm for online cartography. Landsat-live reveals the planet's surface in real time and in stunning resolution, fed by a constant stream of public-domain imagery from NASA’s Landsat 8 satellite.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jacqueline Garcia pd1's curator insight, March 22, 2015 12:47 PM

In this article we are shown the development and evolution of cartography. We can observe the changing geography on the planet and the real time gives us an accurate reading. I feel like this innovation could greatly help us.

Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 2015 4:34 PM

Summary: This interesting article talks a lot about modern technologies effect on the popularity of geography. This article talks about how programs like Google Earth have caused a general interest to arise about physical geography.

 

Insight: This article is significant to unit 1 because it shows how GIS can be so influential to not only geographers but to the rest of society.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 25, 2015 12:16 PM

unit 1

Rescooped by Cathleen Griffin Smythe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How does the United Nations work?

"Ever curious about the reaches of the United Nation and what they do? Here's a great video featuring Dr. Binoy Kampmark from RMIT University.  This short video can help improve your understanding of the UN, including its role in world politics and policy making."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 2015 8:47 PM

Unit 4

This video explains what goes on at United Nations meetings. 193 people gather in New York to discuss matters of peace and security. Established in 1945 made up of 50 countries and made to prevent another World War. The UN deals with matters of economics social policy, human rights, and culture. And the most important parts is the security council (made up of France, Britain, the United States, China, and Russia) and the general assembly. 

Jacob McCullough's curator insight, May 26, 2015 6:01 PM

Just a nice brief summary or how the United nations worked for political geography 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 8:47 AM

The UN is one of the most impact organizations we have today. The UN is a powerful peacekeeping supranational organization organized to help all nations and countries

Scooped by Cathleen Griffin Smythe
Scoop.it!

Wargaming: computerized scenario planning

Stratfor conducted extensive scenario planning when considering Russia's offensive military options toward Ukraine. In this video some of the broader themes and deduction will be examined.
more...
Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, March 17, 2015 4:24 PM

Scooped by eth Dixon
onto Rhode Island Geography Education Alliance

Daniel Rasmus's curator insight, March 19, 2015 6:37 PM

Interesting exploration of what Russia might do in Eastern Europe. Great examples of scenario planning - facts and how things might work. Eliminate the impossible and reveal the real options.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 25, 2015 9:05 PM

Technology can be useful when designing strategies and making political decisions when war hits countries. War-gaming can be helpful for Ukraine and even for Russian governments on how to refine their military and political strategies during war. It simulates the question &what if& and can be tested without being hazardous for any one. In fact, war-gaming integrates all possibilities of how and what things can be done and also can narrow to a few options. Computerized animation models help and allow for the construction and display of a lot of options of how things can be done and what can not be. War-gaming can even be useful in predicting what may be happen in the near future.

Rescooped by Cathleen Griffin Smythe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

A map of all the underwater cables that connect the internet

A map of all the underwater cables that connect the internet | Geography ideas | Scoop.it
Do you know how the internet gets across the ocean? This amazing map shows every cable that makes it possible.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Olivier Tabary's curator insight, March 25, 2015 4:28 PM

And no, not everything has turned virtual! We still rely on concrete stuff. Cables network says a lot about the way our World works. 

Logan Haller's curator insight, May 25, 2015 9:07 PM

This article deals with unit 1 because it has to do with maps. This map shows how underwater cables connect the internet throughout the world. The cables transmit 99% of international data instantly. On this map you can also see latency. Another map in this article shows 1912 trade routes and underwater cables today. The routes are similar and the interdependency has stayed but the methods and meanings for each of these things are different. To pass the ocean is risky by the investments, and trading. Sailors took tHess risks and now the tech companies are taking them. The cables are thin in the deep water equalling 3 inches across. In addition the cables are thicker in shallower water. The interesting thing is these cables can go as deep as Mount Everest is high. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:12 AM

Because globalization.  


Tags: Time-Space Compression, development, technology, economic, globalization, industry, unit 6 industry.

Rescooped by Cathleen Griffin Smythe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Can India become a superpower?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Paul Farias's curator insight, April 9, 2015 11:29 AM

If you were to ask me before watching this video, i would say absolutely. They have the capability because they are full of intelligent people, they also have enough people to do it. Something is just holding them back from moving forward...

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 15, 2015 3:15 PM

I really enjoyed this video; it's packed with a lot of information, but all of it is relevant to its main discussion of India as a potential superpower. In class, we discussed the importance of the Mississippi River Valley and the Great Lakes Basin played in the development of the US economy and the rise of the US as a global superpower, and this does not differ very much from the intricate river systems that litter the Indian subcontinent. The Ganges River Valley has historically been home to millions of people, facilitating agricultural development as well as trade. The lack of natural boundaries within the nation has allowed for the diffusion of the thousands of different cultures, customs, religions, and languages that find their home within India, although this has lead to division amongst its people. Internal disputes have paved the way for foreign leaders to seize control of the subcontinent, as evidenced by the Mughal Empire, and the eventual control of India by the British. Independence has lead to huge political and economic developments, as well as forming a distinct national identity that has, so far, risen above the petty sectionalist and race-related squabbles of yesteryear, but sectional rivalries continue to be had between the various Indian states. All the tools needed to become a superpower are at India's disposal; all it must do is seize the opportunity.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:48 AM

anyone who doesn't think that India can become a superpower is insane. they already are one. they have nukes. they have a billion people. they have massive industry, and they have a history of conflict with their neighbors.

Rescooped by Cathleen Griffin Smythe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

15 Countries In 4 Minutes (Time Lapse)

"During the past two years, Kien Lam went on the kind of trip most could only dream about. The photographer wanted to "see as much of the world as possible," so he visited 15 countries around the globe, from Mexico to New Zealand, snapping more than 10,000 photographs along the way. He edited his work together to make this stupendous time-lapse, which may be one of the most envy-inducing travel diaries I've ever seen."

 

Tags: landscape, time lapse, video.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 28, 2015 1:00 AM
http://www.bharatemployment.com/
Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, March 8, 2015 11:09 AM

Magnifique

Eden Eaves's curator insight, March 23, 2015 11:56 PM

Unit 3

This time-lapse is one of the most amazing videos I've ever seen. Displaying the street-life in India, sand dunes in Arizona, the coast of Cozumel, coral reefs in Australia, mountains in Nepal, a castle in Scotland, Dubai's bright night lights, hobbit holes in the Shire and so many more amazing places captured in a few short seconds. It truly makes me feel like I traveled the world in 4.5 minutes.

Rescooped by Cathleen Griffin Smythe from Human Interest
Scoop.it!

What is Geography?

A Prezi created for Geography 491: Senior Seminar in Geography and the "by undergrads, for undergrads" website GEOCUSE: geocuse.syr.edu

Via Seth Dixon, Jukka Melaranta
more...
Flo Cuadra Scrofft's curator insight, March 21, 2015 9:38 PM

This presentation talks about the misconceptions of geography and about what it really involves. Geographers describe and try to explain how locations interact and relate to one another; are arranged the way they are; and have become what they are now. They also use critical thinking to project what the world might look like in the future. As there's usually so many questions that have to be answered, geography is an interdisciplinary work, meaning that it is a blend of natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Geographers also develop other skills, such as mapping and graphing (spatial representation skills) and development of verbal concepts, frameworks and mathematical models (spatial theorizing skills). Geography, therefore, can be used to study many issues, such as climate change, sustainability, human rights, among others.

Reflection- as the presentation accurately shows, many people believe that geography is just about memorizing countries and our world's natural resources locations, but in reality, geography goes much deeper than that. Geography is about asking questions and trying to come out with the best answers in order to solve issues that can range from local usage of land to international security.

Gregory Stewart's curator insight, August 29, 2015 9:37 AM

Prezi created by students interested in the field of geography.

Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 7, 2015 4:26 PM
Seth Dixon's insight:

This Prezi was created by students from theSyracuse Geography Department as part of a Senior Seminar to explain the disciple, the major and its utility.   This is a great recap of the discipline, the major and it's utility.

Scooped by Cathleen Griffin Smythe
Scoop.it!

Can you name these countries using only satellite photos?

Can you name these countries using only satellite photos? | Geography ideas | Scoop.it
The view from above.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Cathleen Griffin Smythe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

For the Love of Maps

For the Love of Maps | Geography ideas | Scoop.it
By Seth Dixon, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Geography, Rhode Island College I have a confession to make; I’m a map geek. Even as a kid watching Raiders of the Lost Ark, I was fascinated by the map...

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Adriene Mannas's curator insight, December 12, 2014 11:05 AM

Unit 1 Nature and Perspectives of Geography

 

This article shows that people often still love maps. Some people grow out of map loving as a teenager and it is not as popular for people to like them anymore. This article tells haw maps are being pushed out of style and how it is hurting our intelligence.

 

This ties into human geography through the fact that it is needed to have a passion for geographical thinking to even get into Human Geography. This shows how not learning about mas can drastically hurt and is drawing away from the geographical field.

Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 2, 2015 5:57 PM

Anything by Dr. Seth is worth reading!

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 27, 2015 12:02 AM

I'm taking World Regional Geography because I love maps as well. I am more of a visual learner rather than a verbal learner. In my spare time, I like to map out my dream restaurants and my dream home and turning it into a map itself helps me understand locations in the easiest way. It also helps me identify one area's size and shape in comparison to other's.