Geography Education
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Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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What Anthony Bourdain Understood About Cities

What Anthony Bourdain Understood About Cities | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The work of the acclaimed chef and writer, who has died at 61, provides a model for a truly inclusive urbanism based on the creativity of all human beings.
Seth Dixon's insight:

At the APHG reading last week, it felt as if everyone was in shock and mourning Anthony Bourdain's passing.  I felt so amazingly thick, but I was dying to ask "who?"  Judging by everyone's reaction, I think I'm the only geographer who has never watched any of his shows and was feeling the shame.  I quickly checked out Parts Unknown (on Netflix) and the appeal of his work was immediately evident; it is more about place than it is strictly about the food.  Food is simply his portal into understanding the people, culture, and politics of a given place.  Some say that his approach brings an anti-colonial flair to urbanism and travel, but as I'm a newbie to his work, I'm just going to start appreciating it now as we mourn his loss.

 

Tags: cultureworldwide, diffusion, urban, urbanism, place, food,

 colonialismvideo, media

 

 

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drma zaheri's comment, June 28, 2018 11:57 AM
good
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The Age of Borders

The Age of Borders | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The creation date of (almost) every international border.  Full-size image here."

 

Tags: infographic, worldwide, borders, political, historical.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, February 24, 2018 3:04 AM
Political Unit: History of  borders
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, February 27, 2018 11:33 AM

Preliminary - Political Geography 

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Why Don’t We All Speak the Same Language?

Why Don’t We All Speak the Same Language? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
There are 7,000 languages spoken on Earth. What are the costs — and benefits — of our modern-day Tower of Babel?
Seth Dixon's insight:

These two podcasts are great mainstream looks at issues that filled with cultural geography content.  So many languages on Earth is clearly inefficient (the EU spends $1 billion per year on translation), and yet, linguistic diversity is such a rich part of humanity's cultural heritage.  Listen to the first episode, Why Don't We All Speak the Same Language? as well as the follow-up episode, What Would Be the Best Universal Language?

 

Tags: languagecultureworldwide, English, regions, diffusiontechnology.

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Andrew Kahn's curator insight, November 5, 2017 12:13 AM
Culture speaks louder than words
 
Laurie Ruggiero's curator insight, May 29, 2018 9:48 PM
Unit 3
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100 Great Teaching Images

100 Great Teaching Images | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Nature and humankind are both great artists, and when they join forces, amazing masterpieces can be produced. Today Bright Side has collected for you works in which the combined efforts of mother nature and photographic artists have captured magic moments showing the wondrous diversity of modern life and the natural world. Pictured above is the Westerdok District in Amsterdam."

 

Tags: images, artlandscape, worldwide.

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Mireia Civís Zaragoza's curator insight, December 29, 2016 2:36 PM
fotos espectaculars
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, January 9, 2017 7:10 AM
100 Great Teaching Images
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How People Around the World Take Exams

How People Around the World Take Exams | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Examinations, tests, assessments—whatever the nomenclature, it’s hard to imagine schooling without them. Testing is the most popular method of quantifying individuals’ knowledge, often with the intention of objectively measuring aptitude and ability. Test-taking is a dreaded experience that the country’s kids and young adults share with their counterparts across the globe. The ritual at its core doesn’t vary much: Students sit at a table or a computer desk (or sometimes, as shown below, on the floor), pencil and/or mouse in hand, the clock ticking away mercilessly."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I am torn on how to teach these two ideas about cultures and societies all around the world:

  1. People and cultures are different all over the world.
  2. People and cultures are the same all over the world.

Cultural practices are often so similar, are done in slight different fashion.  This photo gallery can create opportunities for our students to 'see' themselves in other cultures while at the same time seeing the richness of global cultural practices. 


TagseducationK12, worldwide.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 2:58 PM

unit 3

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 2:59 PM

unit 3

careerpath12's curator insight, March 11, 2016 6:10 AM

I am torn on how to teach these two ideas about cultures and societies all around the world:

People and cultures are different all over the world.People and cultures are the same all over the world.

Cultural practices are often so similar, are done in slight different fashion.  This photo gallery can create opportunities for our students to 'see' themselves in other cultures while at the same time seeing the richness of global cultural practices. 


Tags: education, K12, worldwide.

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World Literacy Map: Literacy Rate Adult Total of People Ages 15 and Above

World Literacy Map: Literacy Rate Adult Total of People Ages 15 and Above | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Percentage of a country's population that can read and write. Country's define literacy age between 7 and 20 years old. The standard age for literacy most countries is 15 years of age.


TagseducationK12, developmentmap, worldwide.

Seth Dixon's insight:

My 10 year-old daughter was looking in our atlas a while back (yes, she is my daughter) and in the encyclopedic entry of each country she started noticing that literacy rates were included.  She started asking about which regions had higher and lower literacy rates. This became a teaching moment about the power of the map--I explained that all this data can be more easily accessed and seen on a map and this interactive map is what we discovered.  We need to help student find the maps and data to answer their questions (and we need to make sure that they are curious enough to ask questions about the way the world works).  

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Konstantinos Kalemis's curator insight, August 3, 2015 7:10 AM

My 10 year-old daughter was looking in our atlas a while back (yes, she is my daughter) and in the encyclopedic entry of each country she started noticing that literacy rates were included.  She started asking about which regions had higher and lower literacy rates. This became a teaching moment about the power of the map--I explained that all this data can be more easily accessed and seen on a map and this interactive map is what we discovered.  We need to help student find the maps and data to answer their questions (and we need to make sure that they are curious enough to ask questions about the way the world works).  

Annenkov's curator insight, August 5, 2015 9:29 PM

My 10 year-old daughter was looking in our atlas a while back (yes, she is my daughter) and in the encyclopedic entry of each country she started noticing that literacy rates were included.  She started asking about which regions had higher and lower literacy rates. This became a teaching moment about the power of the map--I explained that all this data can be more easily accessed and seen on a map and this interactive map is what we discovered.  We need to help student find the maps and data to answer their questions (and we need to make sure that they are curious enough to ask questions about the way the world works).  

geographynerd's curator insight, August 9, 2015 7:21 AM

My 10 year-old daughter was looking in our atlas a while back (yes, she is my daughter) and in the encyclopedic entry of each country she started noticing that literacy rates were included.  She started asking about which regions had higher and lower literacy rates. This became a teaching moment about the power of the map--I explained that all this data can be more easily accessed and seen on a map and this interactive map is what we discovered.  We need to help student find the maps and data to answer their questions (and we need to make sure that they are curious enough to ask questions about the way the world works).  

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52 Places to Go in 2015

52 Places to Go in 2015 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Untrammeled oases beckon, once-avoided destinations become must-sees, and familiar cities offer new reasons to visit.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Most geographers have more than a little bit of wanderlust.  Maybe we don't all have the pocketbook for it, but so many people have the desire to explore, travel and see parts of the world that feel as if they are mythical.  For students that have the curiosity, it our mission as educators to cultivate that and help them frame the world into a geographic perspective.  I've always felt that window-seat flyers are have the seed of a geographer embedded within them...let's make sure those seeds can grow. 


Tags: place, tourism.

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Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 25, 2015 10:16 PM

There are a variety of places to choose from when it comes to vacationing, but one of these places may be in your next trip in 2015. All countries have their own attractions. You will find from old cities to modern suburbs to sky-scraping metropolitan cities establishing their place global tourism market. But one thing that shocks me is how the country of Cuba has been open to the tourism business, where for so many years their communist system has been failing and now they seem to be attracted to the tourism business. In many of these countries, building development has stopped for long time but in other places, modern infrastructure brings more tourists to the city. Urbanism plays a big role in how to distribute the cities. Furthermore, cultures, cities, variety of natural landscape, natural beaches, and tradition are some of few points that attract tourism business in the area. However, in some of these places religion, political, and security needs to be addressed and policies must be implemented in order to market these areas as tourist zones. Islamic countries, communist countries, old and modern cities, and even poor countries are all becoming good places to visit in 2015.

Annabelle Damasco's curator insight, August 7, 2015 11:48 AM

Most geographers have more than a little bit of wanderlust.  Maybe we don't all have the pocketbook for it, but so many people have the desire to explore, travel and see parts of the world that feel as if they are mythical.  For students that have the curiosity, it our mission as educators to cultivate that and help them frame the world into a geographic perspective.  I've always felt that window-seat flyers are have the seed of a geographer embedded within them...let's make sure those seeds can grow. 


Tags: place, tourism.

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The shocking differences in basic body language around the world

The shocking differences in basic body language around the world | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The body speaks volumes. But what it says depends on the culture you're in.


Tagscultureinfographic, worldwide.

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Gaëlle Solal's curator insight, April 1, 2015 5:58 PM

ça vous en bouche un coin?!

 

Payton Sidney Dinwiddie 's curator insight, April 14, 2015 11:00 PM

This shows the costums that several other Countries use in north America we cross our legs but in Countries Like Asia disrespectful. In America we view blowing or Noise is normal in Japan that Considered rude

Roman M's curator insight, April 16, 2015 5:17 PM

This article shows the different customs on gestures or body language in the world. What we might do is disrespectful in another country. For example, even some as simple as crossing your legs while sitting is common in North America and some European countries. However, it is viewed disrespectful in Asia and the Middle East.

RM

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Human Development Index (HDI)

Human Development Index (HDI) | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"This map shows Human Development Index (HDI) for 169 countries in the World. The HDI is a comparative measure of life expectancy, literacy, education, and standard of living for countries worldwide. The HDI sets a minimum and a maximum for each dimension, called goalposts, and then shows where each country stands in relation to these goalposts, expressed as a value between 0 and 1, where greater is better. The Human Development Index (HDI) measures the average achievements in a country in three basic dimensions of human development: health, knowledge and standard of living."

 

Tags: development, statistics, worldwide.

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Caroline Ivy's curator insight, May 18, 2015 3:41 PM

This article discusses the Human Development Index (HDI), what it is, and how it is calculated. 

 

This chart displays that the top three spots on the HDI are occupied by Norway, Australia, and the Netherlands respectively, with the USA coming in fourth. As HDI is calculated by comparing aspects like literacy, standard of living, education, and life expectancy, why are two European countries and Australia in the top 3? Something to be looked at is the in-migration of each country. Immigrants arrival in large numbers in some countries can lower HDI if they are refugees or come from a country with a lower HDI, for they may be illiterate, have a low education, and therefore a low life expectancy. With in migration to the US tightly controlled but in constant motion, their HDI could be pulled down to 4th. As Norway and Australia and the Netherlands are not the main destination for refugees, their HDI could be higher.   

Cody Price's curator insight, May 27, 2015 5:49 AM

The HDI is the human development index which ranks countries in many different aspects. The higher the country the more developed and modern it is. The least amount of death and the longest lives are here. It is more stable the higher the country.

 

This relates to the topic in unit 6 of HDI. this map shows the basic HDIS of the world and the patterns formed by the HDI layout of the world. 

Anna Sasaki's curator insight, May 27, 2015 7:04 AM

This map shows the Human Development Index around the world. The HDI depends on a set list of variables, ranking them from 1st to last. Nations considered to be "Western" are more developed than nations in regions such as Africa and Asia, although all nations are slowly but steadily developing, improving their Human Development Index ranking.

The HDI shows development in nations, although leaving out Inequality factors. This map also allows us to see spatially what regions tend to be more developed as well as developing.

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How cultures around the world make decisions

How cultures around the world make decisions | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Is the American obsession with individual freedom really such a great idea? What other cultures know about how to make good choices.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This article show three distinct cultural approaches to the concept of choice, showing how they shape people and communities and cultural systems.  The three models discussed are:

  • One American model: Give me personal autonomy or give me death.
  • The Amish model: Belonging, not choice, is crucial.
  • One Asian model: Focus on interdependence and harmony, not independence and self-expression.

This TED talk from Malcolm Gladwell is also an interesting exploration into the world of choice and options.


Tagsculture, worldwideTED.

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Dennis Swender's curator insight, November 11, 2014 8:31 PM

Decision tilmes, more or less

Scott Langston's curator insight, November 16, 2014 11:26 PM

Culture's influence on decision-making

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The First Day of School Around the World

The First Day of School Around the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Take a look at the first day of school celebrations around the world!
Seth Dixon's insight:

Access to education is one of the great indicators of development and political stability--educators wish nothing but the best education possible for the next generation, but the experience is quite variable across the globe.  As many places have recently started school again, this article is a reminder that this practice is experienced differently around the world. 


TagseducationK12, developmentperspective, worldwide.

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The Silk Road: Connecting the ancient world through trade

"With modern technology, a global exchange of goods and ideas can happen at the click of a button. But what about 2,000 years ago? Shannon Harris Castelo unfolds the history of the 5,000-mile Silk Road, a network of multiple routes that used the common language of commerce to connect the world's major settlements, thread by thread."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This TED-ED lesson was produced in part by an AP Human Geography teacher and the strands of geographic thought in this video are evident.  More geographers should make their own TED ED lessons; thanks for blazing the trail Shannon! 


Tags: TED, worldwide, transportation, globalization, diffusion, historical, and video.

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Amanda Morgan's comment, September 13, 2014 10:09 PM
Great video! Very cool to see how far the world has come in regards to globalization. Technology has allowed the people across the globe to immerse themselves in other cultures and good from other parts of the world.
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 3:51 PM

Great video! Very cool to see how far the world has come in regards to globalization. Technology has allowed the people across the globe to immerse themselves in other cultures and good from other parts of the world.

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Follow the Things

"Who makes the things that we buy?  Few of us know. They seem untouched by human hands. Occasionally there's a news story, a documentary film, or an artwork showing the hidden ingredients in our coffee, t-shirts, or iPads. They often 'expose' unpleasant working conditions to encourage more 'ethical' consumer or corporate behaviour. followthethings.com is this work's 'online store'. Here you can find out who has followed what, why and how; the techniques used to 'grab' its audiences; the discussions and impacts that this has provoked; and how to follow things yourself."
Seth Dixon's insight:

Where did your T-Shirt come from?   Where did the food your parents bought at the grocery store come from?  What's the origin of the components in your cell phone?  These questions all allude to what geographers call a commodity chain analysis.  Analyzing where the consumer goods that we use every day came from can make global issues hit a little closer to home and reinforce concepts such as globalization. The website Follow the Things is a great resource for teaching students about commodity chains and mapping out your own personal geographies.


Tags: industry, economic, globalization, consumption.

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Fran Martin's curator insight, September 10, 2013 8:37 AM

Great website by colleague Ian Cook at Exeter University

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, September 10, 2013 8:56 AM

About Globalisation, flows and production today. 

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 5:32 PM

Where did your T-Shirt come from?   Where did the food your parents bought at the grocery store come from?  What's the origin of the components in your cell phone?  These questions all allude to what geographers call a commodity chain analysis.  Analyzing where the consumer goods that we use every day came from can make global issues hit a little closer to home and reinforce concepts such as globalization. The website Follow the Things is a great resource for learning  about commodity chains and mapping out your own personal geographies.

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Are Americans trashing the English language?

"Are American's trashing the English language? The Economists language expert, Lane Greene, knows a thing or two about English. Lane is a fan of words, lots of words, and Lane is an American living in London. He's become accustomed to British English slang. But Lane often hears Britons complain that there are too many American words and expressions creeping into British English, these are called Americanisms. British writer Matthew Engel can't stand Americanisms being used in Britain and even wrote a book about it. But are Americanisms trashing British English?"

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video touches on important cultural and spatial dynamics of the linguistic change impacting the world's current lingua franca...in other words, this is incredibly relevant to human geography. 

 

Tags: languagecultureworldwide, English, diffusion,

 colonialism.

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Matt Manish's curator insight, March 8, 2018 5:00 PM
I found this video very enjoyable to watch and I learned a lot more about how British people feel about the American language, especially in their own culture. I knew that American English and British English had some small differences with the spelling of some words and differences in some terms for the same object such as lift and elevator. But I didn't realize how some American phrases or "Americanisms" have crept into the British English language and are causing some English citizens to be upset about it.
In response to this information, I have to side with Lane Greene's opinion towards the end of this video. The fact that "Americanisms" are creeping into the British English language is the sign of a healthy and developing language. It means that one language that is being affected by another language because it has a global reach throughout the world. This is a positive thing that shouldn't be feared because as we can see from history, languages change over time and tend to never stay the same.
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Kazakhstan to switch from Cyrillic to Latin alphabet

Kazakhstan to switch from Cyrillic to Latin alphabet | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Kazakh was written in Arabic script until 1920 when it was substituted by the Latin alphabet. In 1940, it was replaced by a Cyrillic one. 'Given that over 100 countries in the world use the Latin script, it is crucial for Kazakhstan's integration into the global educational and economic environment,' said Gulnar Karbozova.

The former Soviet Republic declared independence in 1991. Its state language is Kazakh, a member of the Turkic family.

Yet, Russian is widely spoken across Kazakhstan and is its second official language."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Having to translate your language into another is one level of cultural difference, but having to change into another writing system (transliteration) adds an extra layer of foreignness that makes interactions more difficult.  Kazakhstan, a with a history of connections to the Middle East and Russia, is now making a choice that appears to signal greater connection to the larger global community.  This is not going to be an easy transitions, as as this additional BBC article notes, the choice comes with plenty of advantages and disadvantages

 

Tags: languagecultureworldwide, regions, Central Asia, Kazakhstan.

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Olivia Campanella's curator insight, October 29, 2018 3:39 PM
In this article it is explained how Kazakhstan is to switch from a Cyrillic alphabet to a Latin one. Kazakhstan President, Nursultan Narzarbeyeu signed a decree stating the switch of the country's alphabet from Cyrillic to Latin. Uzbekistan and Azerbaijan have already switched theirs. Kazakh was written in Arabic in the 1920's until it was switched to Latin. In the 1940's the Latin alphabet was replaced with a Cyrillic one. 
Matt Danielson's curator insight, October 31, 2018 3:29 AM
The culture of Kazakhstan has had so many different regions influencing it over the years it has affected and changed its language, writing, and culture overall. The originally wrote in san script (Arabic influence) then in Cryillic(in influence from Eastern Europeans south Eastern Europeans  Now to Latin (under western cultural influence). 
Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, November 1, 2018 3:42 PM
Kazakhstan's President has signed a decree to switch the official alphabet from Cyrillic to Latin. They are just one of several ex-soviet nations who has switched to the Latin alphabet. It will be extremely hard to do and will take a lot of time, but it is not the first time Kazakh has been changed. Originally it was written in Arabic, switches to Latin in 1920 and in 1940 replaced by the Cyrillic one. Think about why they want to change to a Latin Alphabet. Are they attempting to move away from Russia's sphere of influence to become more involved with the west?
 
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Funeral Customs Around the World

Funeral Customs Around the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A funeral is a ceremony marking an individual's death. Funeral customs vary widely between culture, religion, and geographic area. These customs are based on the beliefs and traditions of our ancestors. Although there are a multitude of different rituals, there are also some that are practiced worldwide. These include burials, cremations, and spirit offerings."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This story map was created by one of my students, exploring some of the unusual funerary customs around the world. 

 

Tag: cemetery, cultureStoryMap, worldwide.

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Reading the world in 196 books

Reading the world in 196 books | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"I set myself the challenge of trying to read a book from every country (well, all 195 UN-recognised states plus former UN member Taiwan) in a year to find out what I was missing.

With no idea how to go about this beyond a sneaking suspicion that I was unlikely to find publications from nearly 200 nations on the shelves of my local bookshop, I decided to ask the planet’s readers for help. I created a blog called A Year of Reading the World and put out an appeal for suggestions of titles that I could read in English."

 

Tags: languagecultureworldwide, English.

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Looking back at the Millennium Development Goals

"In which John examines the progress of the UN's Millennium Development Goals over the last 15 years and looks ahead to the Global Goals. Can we live in a world where extreme poverty and undernourishment are rare? Are we closer to gender equality? How have infant mortality rates and maternal mortality rates changed in the last 25 years? And how will we ensure that the astonishing progress since 1990 continues?"

Seth Dixon's insight:

The world isn't perfect, but it is getting better.  The UN Millennium Goals were ambitious and overall have been a huge success (click here to see more from the Bill Gates videos the were referenced in the video above).  Today, world leaders are setting a new batch of developmental goals to work on for the next 15 years.  These Global Goals are even more ambitious and can give the global community direction and purpose.   


Tags: development, worldwide.

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How learning to love geography can help make the world a better place

How learning to love geography can help make the world a better place | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"It’s a good time to reflect on what truly inspires us. What gives us, as individuals, our own sense of independence? And how can we apply that sense of joyful independence to help us engage more actively and participate more readily in the world—to make it a better place, even? Cultivating a better geographical and cultural appreciation for the world, in the next generation as well as in our own, is a pretty good place to start."


TagseducationK12geography educationperspective, worldwide.

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Kenneth Peterson's curator insight, July 19, 2015 5:59 PM

Montessori shines once again!

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50 Reasons to #LoveTheWorld

50 Reasons to #LoveTheWorld | Geography Education | Scoop.it
We asked a range of people, from writers and chefs to musicians and photographers, to share one experience from the last year that truly inspired them – something that, in no uncertain terms, reminded them why they love the world. Madly. Here's what they told us.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Most geographers have more than a little bit of wanderlust.  This BBC article is filled with images, quotes and insights into places all around the globe that fill me will a sense of awe and wonder.  For students that have the curiosity, it our mission as educators to cultivate that and help them frame information about the world into a geographic perspective.  I've always felt that window-seat flyers are have the seed of a geographer embedded within them...let's make sure those seeds can grow. 


Tags: place, tourism.

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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, April 14, 2015 2:45 PM

The World is beautiful, but that is not being advertised except by those who want to make money with its beauty (tourism), or call attention to the fact we are destroying it (ecologists). News of destruction and suffering and corruption fill the news outlets, giving us a warped, one percent view of the planet we live in. The only one we have.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 18, 2015 8:22 PM

Traveling around the world exposes all culture, traditions and history that probably you will fall in love with. These outstanding images around the world empathize regions, food, people, space, and how people survive on a daily basis will make your mind travel and enjoy places. In every image, we can take and admire sceneries from every single part of the world. Photography captures every image such of cultures, sceneries and geography for people who cannot afford to travel around world.

Break Dancing, Phnom Penh-Style

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Worldwide Country Comparison

Worldwide Country Comparison | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"MyLifeElsewhere allows you to compare your home country with different countries around the world. Ever wonder what your life would be like if you were born somewhere else?"

Seth Dixon's insight:

Did you know that with 1/30th the territory of the United States, Norway still has over 25% more coastline?  I didn't either until I compared Norway to the United States using My Life Elsewhere.  This site is designed allow United States students to imagine how their lives might be different if they were born in a different part of the world.  Students would probably die 21 years earlier if they were born in Liberia and 11 times more likely to have died in infancy.   Students would be 43.8% less likely to grow up and be unemployed and have 36.3% less babies if they were born in Taiwan.  This side-by-side format is a great way to help students help make these statistics real and meaningful.  One major drawback: this site only allows users to compare a country to the United States.  If you prefer to have students compare, say Cuba to the United Arab Emirates, I would recommend that you try If It Where My Home


Tags: comparison, worldwide, statistics, development.

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HG Académie de Rennes's curator insight, January 31, 2015 6:56 AM

Un site d'une grande simplicité d'utilisation bien qu'en anglais. Le principe est de choisir deux pays dans un menu déroulant pour en comparer les principaux indicateurs de développement sous la forme de petites infographies très pédagogiques.
La comparaison est évidemment un processus de raisonnement à mettre en place pour situer et caractériser en géographie. On songera ainsi à l'utilisation d'un tel outil dans le cadre de l'étude des inégalités de développement en classe de 5e et de Seconde, mais aussi pour une mise en perspective sur les Territoires dans la mondialisation en classe de 4e afin de caractériser un PMA, un pays émergent, un pays développé (cf. exemple réalisé pour l'illustration).

Dernière information sur ce site, les statistiques utilisées proviennent des bases de données open source de la CIA américaine.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, February 8, 2015 12:51 AM

After studying this comparison tool and using it to find the best of the best and worst of the worst, I picked out some highlights I'd like to share. Monaco is clearly the place to be born, earn, and live. When compared to the USA, the infant mortality rate is 71% less, the life expectancy is 10 years longer @ 84, and you'll earn 62% more money, no doubt because you have ten more years in which to do so. I believe the stats may be skewed a bit in this country comparison as the very rich live there and they have access to the best medical care, and probably don't have very many infants with them when they make the move from elsewhere, hence the low infant mortality rate. Austria is not a bad second choice as you are 33% less likely to be unemployed. On a sobering note, the life expectancy if you live in Namibia is only 52! Yikes, I'm already 53... It's far worse however in Swaziland. The life expectancy is sadly only 50.5 years and you are 44 times more likely to have AIDS than if you lived here. 26.5% of the population has AIDS! Be thankful for where you live and stop complaining, it's far worse on average in nearly all other countries.

Monika Fleischmann's curator insight, February 15, 2015 9:59 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

Did you know that with 1/30th the territory of the United States, Norway still has over 25% more coastline?  I didn't either until I compared Norway to the United States using My Life Elsewhere.  This site is designed allow United States students to imagine how their lives might be different if they were born in a different part of the world.  Students would probably die 21 years earlier if they were born in Liberia and 11 times more likely to have died in infancy.   Students would be 43.8% less likely to grow up and be unemployed and have 36.3% less babies if they were born in Taiwan.  This side-by-side format is a great way to help students help make these statistics real and meaningful.  One major drawback: this site only allows users to compare a country to the United States.  If you prefer to have students compare, say Cuba to the United Arab Emirates, I would recommend that you try If It Where My Home. 


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Worldwide, Many See Belief in God as Essential to Morality

Worldwide, Many See Belief in God as Essential to Morality | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The position [that belief in God is essential to morality] is highly prevalent, if not universal, in Africa and the Middle East. At least three-quarters in all six countries surveyed in Africa say that faith in God is essential to morality.   People in richer nations tend to place less emphasis on the need to believe in God to have good values than people in poorer countries do."

Seth Dixon's insight:

An important part of the geography of religion is how the non-religious are treated and perceived around the world.  More secular countries tend to be more developed, affluent and wealthy; generally speaking these are the countries that do not believe that morality and a belief in God have to be linked together.  What do you think?  What cultural perspectives shape your thinking?   


Tags: secular, culturereligion, worldwide, perspective.

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Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 27, 2015 12:37 AM

It would make sense that Indonesia is one of the most religious countries in the world being that it has the highest Muslim population. Also, I never thought of Europe as being religious countries which is why I am not surprised that 70% of Europe does not believe that the belief in God needs to be moral. Another reason why I am not surprised is because they are more popular for their ethnic groups such as the french group, italian group and german group. Also, they don't have focused religions. For example, Buddhism was originated in Nepal and worshipped mostly in China, Hinduism was originated in India, Jewish was originated in Israel and Islam was originated in Saudi Arabia and it's practiced mostly in Indonesia and Pakistan. That explains why most parts of Asia (at least southern Asia) has practices specific religions.

Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 28, 2015 4:58 AM

Summary- This figure explains the relationship between regions and their morality based on a God. It is evident what in North America is is almost a 50 50 tie between between believing in god is essential for morality. Only is Europe does God seem less important than the rest of the world. There are other countries such as Chile, Argentina, or Australia that have these same beliefs, but for the most part, most countries see a believe in God as an essential to morality. 

 

Insight- In unit 3 we study the distributions of many things, religion included. Why do so many poorer countries have a stronger faith in God than wealthier ones? It may be because if their ethnic backgrounds, but I think there is more to it. I think when a country is poorer, more people reach out to their God for help. I also think that in wealthier countries there are distractions from religion such as video games and other mass produced technologies that get in the way of people researching their faith.

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 2015 2:55 PM

Unit 3: This article shows the relationship between regions and their morality based on a God. It is evident what in North America is is almost a 50 50 tie between between believing in god is essential for morality. There are other countries such as Chile, Argentina, or Australia that have these same beliefs, but for the most part, most countries see a believe in God as an essential to morality. 

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13 amazing coming of age traditions from around the world

13 amazing coming of age traditions from around the world | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The transition from childhood to adulthood -- the 'coming of age' of boys who become young men and girls who become young women -- is a significant stepping stone in everyone’s life. But the age at which this happens, and how a child celebrates their rite of passage into adolescence, depends entirely on where they live and what culture they grow up in.  Looking back, we'll never forget the majesty that was prom, or the excitement of hitting the dance floor at our friends' co-ed Bar and Bat Mitzvah parties, and why should we? Embarassing or amazing, they were pivotal moments in our lives that deserve remembering. On that note, here are thirteen of it the world’s most diverse coming of age traditions."


Tags: gender, folk culture, culture, indigenous, worldwide.

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Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, October 3, 2014 8:07 AM
Its interesting to see the different cultural traditions that are set at different stages in a persons life as the beginning into adulthood for most. I don't think I would want to be a male in the Brazilian Amazon, or the island of Vanuatu where you literally put your life on the line to prove your ready for adulthood. It shows the differences and what is considered important or the role the person plays in society. I think the mention of the sweet 16 for American girls was a pretty weak presentation. America is a melting pot and represents so much more than that.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 27, 2014 3:59 PM

These traditions reflect the cultural geographies they take place within. In the Brazilian Amazon, the locals use the bullet ants native to the area to use in their Bullet Ant Initation. On North Baffin Island, where Inuits must be able to navigate and hunt in the wilderness of the artic, their coming of age involves a hunting journey that begins with them opening up the lines of communication between men and animals a relationship that the survival of the community hinges on. In the Amish tradition, they send their youth out into the world to witness the perils of modern society as a way to provide them with the choice of Amish Living. In Central and South America, girls have a Quinceanera where they girls solidifies their commitment to her family and faith two very important ideals of that culture. These coming of age traditions reflect the cultural differences between places throughout the world.

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 24, 2015 5:34 AM

I think this article could also fit into the view of culture of gender. The fact that there are separate celebrations in Jewish culture represent the divide between men and women. The Satere-Mawe tradition of wearing bullet ant gloves in order for boys to demonstrate their "manliness" is actually quite sexist. It demonstrates how men must behave in "manly" ways and not cry in order to be viewed as a "true" man. This creates a mentality in boys from a very young age that they must not be "feminine," and that they must be more headstrong than girls to be viewed as a man. The same goes for the Vanuatu tradition. Young boys have to go to the extreme (jump from tall towers with a simply a rope around their legs to keep them from dying) to prove their manhood. Of course these traditions are an important part of their culture, and I have no right to criticize, but I am simply providing an alternative analysis of these traditions.

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A wide-angle view of fragile Earth

A wide-angle view of fragile Earth | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In this image-filled talk, Yann Arthus-Bertrand displays his three most recent projects on humanity and our habitat -- stunning aerial photographs in his series "The Earth From Above," personal interviews from around the globe featured in his web project "6 billion Others," and his soon-to-be-released movie, "Home," which documents human impact on the environment through breathtaking video.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I've linked galleries of the artistic, aerial photography of Yann Arthus-Bertrand several times before.  In this Ted Talk, you can hear what motivates his artistic vision and the global perspectives that he wants to bring to the fore.  You can also watch the 90-minute video 'Home' that he discusses in the talk here.    

 

Tags: images, art, worldwideTEDenvironment, video.

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Diane Johnson's curator insight, August 25, 2014 3:07 PM

Useful for Human Impact DCI!

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Top 10 Safest Countries In The World In 2014

Top 10 Safest Countries In The World In 2014 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
This list attempts to pinpoint the 10 safest countries in the world by analyzing the Global Peace Index, or GPI, of each country, taking into consideration homicide rates, levels of violent crime, nuclear capabilities and more.
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Albert Jordan's curator insight, April 28, 2014 11:44 PM

None of these countries are surprising. However, many of them have to deal with neighbors and regional issues. New Zealand, on the other hand, does not really have to deal with much. Essentially being isolated except for a large(not differentiating between usable and non usable land), and some small islands to the north - New Zealander's just do their thing and govern their sheep. It goes to show that while they are connected to the global marketplace, by maintaining a small profile and keeping to themselves, they can still enjoy standards of living comparable to the richest and largest nations on the planet. It also helps to have a small population.

16s3d's curator insight, May 2, 2014 8:50 AM

L'indice de paix global agrège des facteurs comme le taux d'homicide, celui de crimes violents et autres. On a un bon modèle pas lui, tout près: la Belgique, n°10 de ce classement. En règle générale, à l'exception notable de la Nouvelle-Zélande, il vaut vivre au nord de l'hémisphère nord...

Emma Lupo's curator insight, October 21, 2014 2:45 AM

For looking at crime