Geography Education
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Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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The American West, 150 Years Ago

The American West, 150 Years Ago | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In the 1860s and 70s, photographer Timothy O'Sullivan created some of the best-known images in American History. After covering the U.S. Civil War, (many of his photos appear in this earlier series), O'Sullivan joined a number of expeditions organized by the federal government to help document the new frontiers in the American West. The teams were composed of soldiers, scientists, artists, and photographers, and tasked with discovering the best ways to take advantage of the region's untapped natural resources. O'Sullivan brought an amazing eye and work ethic, composing photographs that evoked the vastness of the West. He also documented the Native American population as well as the pioneers who were already altering the landscape. Above all, O'Sullivan captured -- for the first time on film -- the natural beauty of the American West in a way that would later influence Ansel Adams and thousands more photographers to come.

 

Tags: images, artlandscape, tourism, historicalUSA.

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Atlas Obscura: A travel guide like no other

"A popular website and now a bestselling book, Atlas Obscura is a guide to many of the world's most unusual places. Serena Altschul discusses some of the awe-inspiring destinations with two of the guide's creators, Josh Foer and Dylan Thuras."

 

Tags: place, tourismvideo, geo-inspiration.

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Treathyl Fox's curator insight, February 10, 2017 11:17 AM
Satisfy your wanderlust for the obscure.
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Why houses in Bermuda have white stepped roofs

Why houses in Bermuda have white stepped roofs | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The island of Bermuda has no fresh-water springs, rivers or lakes so the design of its roofs is essential for collecting rainwater.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is such as distinct, localized example of how people adapt to their physical environment.  It explains why a particularly cultural landscape is prevalent, and the article nicely shows how traditional island living comes into conflict with tourist expectations and consumption patterns.  Tons of good geographic factors in this issue for students to analyze. 

 

Tags: water, tourism, sustainabilityarchitecture, consumption, landscape, Bermuda, environment adapt.

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Mexico is home to world’s largest pyramid

No one knows who constructed this pyramid 2,300 years ago. Cortés missed it when he invaded the pyramid's hometown in 1519 and it wasn't rediscovered until 1910. Today it stands as the largest monument ever constructed.
Seth Dixon's insight:

10 years ago, about 30 miles outside of Veracruz, Mexico, I see a hill completely covered in vegetation.  I notice that the angle is rather uniform and that it appears to have distinct faces at right angles.  It dawns on my that I'm staring at an archeological site that has not been excavated and the Indiana Jones explorer in me is immediately fascinated.  Mexico is filled with sites of ancient civilizations that stir the imagination and this is one of those. 

 

TagsMexicoindigenous, folk cultures, culture, tourism.

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James Piccolino's curator insight, February 8, 6:33 AM
I think that it is very interesting that we still do not know who constructed this pyramid. Even with all of our advanced technology and insight we still come across things that we don't know and possibly will never know. Another interesting bit is how Cortes just somehow "missed" it, so we now get this untouched and unmodified piece of history to study.
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A Medieval Abbey Trapped by Tides and Time

"Mont Saint-Michel emerges from the tides in Normandy, France, like an ancient village from a fairytale. The coastal town built on a massive granite rock cuts a dramatic silhouette against the sky, rising from disappearing marshes to a Gothic Abbey at its height. With a permanent population of around 50, this popular tourist destination has a history dating back to at least the Roman era. Fancy a tour before the tides roll in?"

Seth Dixon's insight:

Coastal physical geography produces some beautiful landforms such as tombolos.  A tombolo is created when sand deposits attach an island to a larger piece of land--think of it as special type of isthmus.  Mont St. Michel is the world’s most famous example because of the iconic walled city with crowned with a striking medieval abbey.  This is one of those fascinating places for both the human and physical geographer.   

 

Tags: water, physical, coastal, geomorphology, landformsFrance, historical, tourism.

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Lauren Wilson's comment, November 8, 2016 1:53 PM
This is a great addition to our lessons regarding erosion of cliffsides, in that it represents structures in place of an ever-evolving coastal environment. That such a feature can remain relatively unchanged by time and tides is a fascinating foothold in this study.
ROCAFORT's curator insight, November 18, 2016 3:06 AM
A Medieval Abbey Trapped by Tides and Time
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The Vatican’s Gallery of Maps Comes Back to Life

The Vatican’s Gallery of Maps Comes Back to Life | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In the 16th century, Pope Gregory assigned the monk and geographer Ignazio Danti to carry out the project. In turn, Danti hired several artistic stars of the day and up-and-comers as well to illustrate the maps, including Girolamo Muziano, Cesare Nebbia and the Flemish brothers Matthijs and Paul Bril. The Brils excelled at landscape paintings—an essential skill for the work.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This 4-year restoration project is a great cultural revival, but it also reveals the importance of geographic information.  The Vatican was a great medieval seat of both religious authority and political power.  This attracted prominent visitors from all over Europe and the map gallery served to convey geographic information about the Italian peninsula.  

 

Tagsart, Italy, historical, Europe, religiontourism, Christianity.

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Loreto Vargas's curator insight, August 6, 2016 6:30 PM
Wonderful and amazing
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The Pan American Highway: The Longest Road In The World

The Pan American Highway: The Longest Road In The World | Geography Education | Scoop.it
At its fullest extent the Pan-American Highway is a network of roads stretching from Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, to Ushuaia, Argentina, a distance of around 30,000 kilometres (19,000 miles).
Seth Dixon's insight:

I love a good road trip, and I while I love the idea of traversing the entire length of the Americas, I think that the idea of it might be better than the actual trip (at least will my kids in the back seat).

 

Tagsmobilitytransportationtourism, South America, Middle America.  

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Douglas Vance's curator insight, January 31, 9:55 AM
I had no idea that it is possible to drive from Alaska to the couthern tip of South America on a nearly contiuous stretch of road. It it interesting to see how that despite some roadways not being intended to be a part of a trans-continental roadway, when connected to other road systems they become a part of one. Being able to drive the route in less than a month makes it all the more impressive and shows how much easier it now is to travel anywhere we want with relative ease.
James Piccolino's curator insight, February 8, 6:57 AM
Wow,yet another feature in our country that I never knew about, I'm finding the increasing amount of things I never even heard of right in our own backyard troubling (although if it lies on the education system or just my own flat out ignorance I have not decided yet). It is interesting that so many people turn to these things as challenges to beat and overcome where most would most likely view it as just another long road for transportation.
tyrone perry's curator insight, March 22, 1:21 PM
 I couldn’t imagine the sites that you would see traveling the road between two different continents in over 14 countries.  30,000 miles, official  and unofficial road with a stretch of road that is uninhabited and another stretch that has no real roads.   I for one would love the beautiful sites that you would see but I would hate the actual traveling, driving  that many miles would drive me crazy.  one thing that I wonder is if you would actually be able to do it without any problems within each country.  The article also does not say How people made it across the Darian gap.  The top of one continent to the bottom of another is just amazing.
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We Don't Coast

We Don't Coast | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A celebration of who we are, where we are and how we operate. It belongs to the 30+ communities who make Omaha—Greater Omaha.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This website is a great example a city selling it's regional distinctiveness to create a sense of civic pride, promote tourism, and attract more businesses.  Often Omaha's distance for the coasts is portrayed as a major weakness, but in a clever play on words, the weakness is acknowledged and reformed into a strength.   

 

Questions to Ponder: How would you promote your own city/region/state?  What would be highlighted on a similar page for your city?  What slogan would you use?

 

Tagsplacetourism, urban, culture, economic

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Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, March 5, 2016 12:15 AM

This website is a great example a city selling it's regional distinctiveness to create a sense of civic pride, promote tourism, and attract more businesses.  Often Omaha's distance for the coasts is portrayed as a major weakness, but in a clever play on words, the weakness is acknowledged and reformed into a strength.   

 

Questions to Ponder: How would you promote your own city/region/state?  What would be highlighted on a similar page for your city?  What slogan would you use?

 

Tags: place, tourism, urban, culture, economic. 

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A Geotaggers' World Atlas

A Geotaggers' World Atlas | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Every city has a picturesque spot or two where the probability of a photo being taken at any given time is pretty high. Now there's a world atlas of maps showing the routes people follow while taking these pictures in every city around the world:Mapbox's Eric Fischer has been working on the "Geotaggers' World Atlas" for five years, using locations of photos uploaded on Flickr over a decade. In his city maps, which now span the world, he connects the dots between subsequent photos taken by a photographer—representing their path in sketchy lines that criss-cross across the city."

 

Tags: mapping, visualizationsocial media, tourism.

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Can You Guess Where You Are in 60 Seconds?

Can You Guess Where You Are in 60 Seconds? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Can you guess where we are taking you today? Here's a clue: This city's name translates to "where the river narrows."
Seth Dixon's insight:

There is a delightfully simple premise to National Geographic video's newest series: after seeing scenes from the cultural and physical landscapes of a place can you guess where in the world it is?  You can find more resources about this unnamed country (no cheating) here.   


Tags: images, placeculture, landscape, tourism

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Do it for Denmark, Take II

Spies Travel is joining forces with wannabe grandmas in the fight against Denmark's low birth rate. Introducing Spies Parent Purchase™: Send your child on an active holiday and get a grandchild.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Not all countries are concerned about overpopulation;  Countries like Japan are in steep decline in terms of their population.  Denmark is a country that is seeking to to encourage higher fertility rates; this travel company is using this salacious ad (as a sequel to Do it for Denmark) to promote the it and themselves, but there is some actual demographic analysis in there). Singapore's National Night was another innovative campaign to boost fertility rates, but they also have a less steamy campaign entitled "Maybe Baby?"

Tag: declining populations.

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Dustin Fowler's curator insight, October 2, 2015 9:59 PM

While we struggle to reduce fertility by offering education and opportunities, in places where there IS education and opportunities, we are struggling to spice things up, for the sake of maintaining our economic prowess.  Here's one of many examples of a country trying to get people to manufacture babies. 

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Hajj stampede: Saudis face growing criticism over deaths

Hajj stampede: Saudis face growing criticism over deaths | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Iran leads growing criticism of Saudi Arabia after the deaths of at least 717 people in a stampede during the Hajj pilgrimage.


Tagstourism, Islam, Saudi Arabiaculture, religion, Middle East.

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Greg Hill's curator insight, September 28, 2015 12:17 PM
Islam, Hajj, Mecca
Matthew Richmond's curator insight, October 26, 2015 12:52 PM

Re-scooped from Professor Dixon, this article shows how the rest of Islam is responding to the recent catastrophe in Mecca. The Saudi government has a responsibility to ensure that the Hajj is a safe venture in a Muslim's life. Since the Hajj is one of the most sacred pillars of Islam, I think someone should consider the idea of putting a multi-national police force in place at Mecca to ensure this kind of thing doesn't happen again.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 7:11 PM

with the massive crush of people who descend on Mecca every year its hard to imagine that this hasn't happened before. Mecca is THE pilgrimage site for Muslims, and holy law dictates that every Muslim should go there in their lifetime.

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A simple choice between two gorgeous photos reveals your personality

A simple choice between two gorgeous photos reveals your personality | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Introvert or extrovert? A quick photo quiz could reveal it all.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This psychology study found that introverts and extroverts prefer different landscapes for their vacations, and they may even seek out different environments for a home. There are many geographic implications to this idea, and I'm still chewing on them.

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Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, September 10, 2015 4:29 PM

Great photos for an introvert 

or extrovert

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25 Photos That Will Make You Fall in Love With Norway

25 Photos That Will Make You Fall in Love With Norway | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"So how gorgeous is Norway? From its majestic wildlife, captivating Northern Lights shows, and snowy mountains, to its vivid landscapes, and mystifying fjords, Norway is a must-visit destination for anyone who loves the outdoors. Plus, opportunities for hiking, kayaking, glacier climbing, fishing, and skiing are endless! If Noway wasn’t already on your travel bucket list, I bet it is now!"

Seth Dixon's insight:

My wife lived in Norway for 18 months, and her love for this country is infectious.  The stunning physical geography leads to some equally magnificent cultural landscapes that were forged in a very rugged, inhospitable environment for early human settlers.   

 

Tags: Norway, place, tourismphysical, Arctic, geo-inspiration, images, artlandscape.

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Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 8:59 PM

My wife lived in Norway for 18 months, and her love for this country is infectious.  The stunning physical geography leads to some equally magnificent cultural landscapes that were forged in a very rugged, inhospitable environment for early human settlers.   

 

Tags: Norway, place, tourismphysical, Arctic, geo-inspiration, images, artlandscape.

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Paris mayor unveils plan ​to restrict traffic and pedestrianize city center

Paris mayor unveils plan ​to restrict traffic and pedestrianize city center | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Anne Hidalgo says she wants to cut the number of cars in French capital by half as part of campaign to tackle pollution
Seth Dixon's insight:

The world's biggest cities are struggling to maintain access to congested downtown areas and still ensure that the downtown maintains it's historic sense of place that generate so much tourism and concentration of cultural amenities.  Pollution is driving cities to change as the private automobile as the default mode of transportation becomes less feasible and unsustainable as cities expand to be far larger than they ever have been before.  

 

Tags: urban, environmentpollution, urban ecology, France, place, tourism, Paris, megacities, transportation.

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Richard Aitchison's curator insight, February 6, 10:02 AM
Traffic, nobody likes to hear that word, but we are always unable to avoid it. In any major city traffic is a way of life, but how can we control it. The Mayor or Paris Anne Hidalgo has been looking for a way to limit the amount of the cars in the city or find a way to diverge traffic to some areas. Some of the reasons behind it are to address pollution issues in a city that has seen incredible increase in population and a rise in cars, which obviously gives way pollution. However, it will take time to improve public transportation and they can divert traffic as much as possible, however people still need to be able to get to work and from place to place. Also for foreigners  on vacation in Paris, obviously a popular place to go, how do you deal with population problems and vacationers?  Tourism is very important for Paris and there is a few concerns with cars, first off if the city becomes overtaken by smog that is never a good thing. Second, if you divert traffic to areas it may confuse travelers, and thirdly if you make major changes to roads or buildings do you change the beautiful landscape of Paris? These issues will be challenges for many Mayors or government officials all over the world, sadly there is not an easy answer. 
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, March 31, 2:05 PM
In an effort to clear some of the traffic in Paris, the mayor has created plans that will prevent some of the traffic in the country’s capital city. She is making these plans because of the pollution that covers the city. By getting rid of half of the traffic, having an electric tram, and introducing more bike lanes, mayor Anne Hidalgo is planning to make the city “green”.
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Linking the most interesting places in the world

Linking the most interesting places in the world | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Every city has a picturesque spot or two where the probability of a photo being taken at any given time is pretty high. Now there's a world atlas of maps showing the routes people follow while taking these pictures in every city around the world:Mapbox's Eric Fischer has been working on the "Geotaggers' World Atlas" for years, using locations of photos uploaded on Flickr over a decade. In his city maps, which now span the world, he connects the dots between subsequent photos taken by a photographer—representing their path in sketchy lines that criss-cross across the city." 

  ---Tanvi Misra on CityLab

 

Tags: mapping, visualizationsocial media, tourism.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Questions to Ponder:

  1. How does the idea of crowdsourcing influence modern-day cartography and geographic data?
  2. What kind of meaning is there in this seemingly random assortment of geotagged images?
  3. Analyze a particular pattern (anywhere in the world). Describe the location, explain the patterns you see and analyze why they are the way they are.
  4. Analyze a particular pattern (somewhere else in the world). Describe the location, explain the patterns you see and analyze why they are the way they are.
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Leah Hood's curator insight, August 22, 2017 4:30 PM

Questions to Ponder:

  1. How does the idea of crowdsourcing influence modern-day cartography and geographic data?
  2. What kind of meaning is there in this seemingly random assortment of geotagged images?
  3. Analyze a particular pattern (anywhere in the world). Describe the location, explain the patterns you see and analyze why they are the way they are.
  4. Analyze a particular pattern (somewhere else in the world). Describe the location, explain the patterns you see and analyze why they are the way they are.
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Discovering All 59 National Parks

"Conor Knighton is winding up his year-long journey through our National Parks. He's returned with a backpack full of picture postcards, along with some thoughts."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This last summer, my family went to five national parks on our cross-country journeys.  I love exploring the wonders and beauties in our National Parks, so this man's 2016 voyage to see all 59 National Parks makes me incredibly jealous.  My grandparents took me to Yellowstone and Yosemite when I was young.  These trips inspired in me a deep awe for the wonders of this Earth.  So go discover someplace new to you this year.  

 

Tags: place, tourismvideo, geo-inspiration.

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Visualizing Exotic Travels

Seth Dixon's insight:

When I watched this cartographic depiction of Indiana Jones’ adventures in Raiders of the Lost Ark as a kid, I was fascinated by the power of the map they used to segue between scenes.  It heightened the level of mystery and intrigue; I felt as if a whole new world was opening up as I was living vicariously through Dr. Jones.  This movie and its maps instilled in me a passion for global adventure, or at least a desire to learn about far off places...so get out there and explore.

 

Tagsmobilitytransportationtourismmapping, place.

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Top 250 Global Attractions - How many have you seen?

Top 250 Global Attractions - How many have you seen? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The ultimate list of the greatest wonders in the world."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I have been fortunate enough to have visited 53 of the places on this list (I have gaping holes in my list and the list itself has some gaping holes itself).  All lists are highly subjective; this list, for example, is heay on urban/cultural/European tourism sites and light on physical/Asian/African destinations.  Most geographers already have enough reasons to go traveling, but this list might spark more.  Who wants to map out these places to verify that initial impression? 

 

Questions to Ponder: Which places are on your dream list?  Which places do you think should have been added to this list?  

 

Tags: place, tourismculture, landscape, geo-inspiration.

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Michael MacNeil's curator insight, April 19, 2016 4:47 PM
Share your insight
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The End of America's Love Affair With Route 66

The End of America's Love Affair With Route 66 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
For a brief time in American tourism, travel was about the journey. Here's how it came to be about the destination.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Route 66 holds a special place in the America’s collective soul and taps into a feelings of nostaglia for a bygone era...but we don't really want to go back to that time (hence the economic decline of these withering small towns). "In 1956, Eisenhower's Interstate Highway System effectively bypassed Route 66. The straight-lined, speedy interstates often bifurcated cities. They also cut paths far from Route 66's small, idiosyncratic towns. The rise of modern air travel also diminished the appeal of the winding, open road.  Yet it was not only new modes of transportation that faded Route 66; it was also a changing definition of 'vacation.' Disneyland and Las Vegas staked their claims to the American travel budget in the mid '50s. Suddenly, the 'there' took precedence over the 'getting there.'"

 

Tagsmobilitytransportationplacetourism, historical.

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Denise Klaves Stewardson's curator insight, March 31, 2016 2:15 PM

Route 66 holds a special place in the America’s collective soul and taps into a feelings of nostaglia for a bygone era...but we don't really want to go back to that time (hence the economic decline of these withering small towns). "In 1956, Eisenhower's Interstate Highway System effectively bypassed Route 66. The straight-lined, speedy interstates often bifurcated cities. They also cut paths far from Route 66's small, idiosyncratic towns. The rise of modern air travel also diminished the appeal of the winding, open road.  Yet it was not only new modes of transportation that faded Route 66; it was also a changing definition of 'vacation.' Disneyland and Las Vegas staked their claims to the American travel budget in the mid '50s. Suddenly, the 'there' took precedence over the 'getting there.'"

 

Tags: mobility, transportation, place, tourism, historical.

ismokuhanen's curator insight, March 31, 2016 2:47 PM

Route 66 holds a special place in the America’s collective soul and taps into a feelings of nostaglia for a bygone era...but we don't really want to go back to that time (hence the economic decline of these withering small towns). "In 1956, Eisenhower's Interstate Highway System effectively bypassed Route 66. The straight-lined, speedy interstates often bifurcated cities. They also cut paths far from Route 66's small, idiosyncratic towns. The rise of modern air travel also diminished the appeal of the winding, open road.  Yet it was not only new modes of transportation that faded Route 66; it was also a changing definition of 'vacation.' Disneyland and Las Vegas staked their claims to the American travel budget in the mid '50s. Suddenly, the 'there' took precedence over the 'getting there.'"

 

Tags: mobility, transportation, place, tourism, historical.

Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, April 1, 2016 12:18 AM

Route 66 holds a special place in the America’s collective soul and taps into a feelings of nostaglia for a bygone era...but we don't really want to go back to that time (hence the economic decline of these withering small towns). "In 1956, Eisenhower's Interstate Highway System effectively bypassed Route 66. The straight-lined, speedy interstates often bifurcated cities. They also cut paths far from Route 66's small, idiosyncratic towns. The rise of modern air travel also diminished the appeal of the winding, open road.  Yet it was not only new modes of transportation that faded Route 66; it was also a changing definition of 'vacation.' Disneyland and Las Vegas staked their claims to the American travel budget in the mid '50s. Suddenly, the 'there' took precedence over the 'getting there.'"

 

Tags: mobility, transportation, place, tourism, historical.

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Mexican culture...Beyond Sombreros and Tequila

Promotional Video Campaign of "Viva Mexico"
http://vivamexico.aiesec.org.mx
Seth Dixon's insight:

I love Mexico and love celebrating Mexican culture...this video is a reminder to not solely focus on the past, but to see a vibrant modern Mexican culture as well. 

 

TagsMexico, folk cultures, culture, tourism.

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Jose leon's curator insight, February 7, 2016 2:25 AM

Watching this video really made me happy since I am Latino. When people think of Mexico they think of a poor country with corrupt politicians. It's funny because the country of Mexico isn't poor it's just the politicians keep it all to themselves. Many of there children take a private plane to Europe just to eat dinner and come back the very same day. This video shows that it is so much more than that. I had no idea that Mexico was number one automotive industry, and the country is extremely beautiful which is no real surprise to anybody. It has 9 out of the 11 ecosystems. Many of the avocadoes that people eat most likely came from Mexico since it’s number 1 exporter, along with tomatoes, mangoes, and guayabas. The Mexican people also have strong family values along with 1134 traditional festivals. 

Alex Smiga's curator insight, February 7, 2016 7:40 PM

Watch the video guay

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Skellig Michael: An Island Far, Far Away

Skellig Michael: An Island Far, Far Away | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Star Wars Epiosde VII was filmed on Skellig Michael island in Ireland. What better place to depict an ancient, mystical, martial asceticism in a galaxy far, far away than an actual ancient eremitic settlement, dripping with stone-cold monastic austerity, located at what was for centuries the very ends of the earth, seven miles off the very tip of a western Irish peninsula?"

Seth Dixon's insight:

This island is dripping with geologic, biogeographical, and religious intrigue that makes this world heritage site a place that is shrouded in mystery.  This article from JSTOR Daily is a great introduction to the island for the incurably curious.  The already vibrant tourism industry is bound to increase after Star Wars used this incredible location in the recent film (much like New Zealand experienced a huge spike in tourism after the Lord the Rings films).  Filmmakers understand the power of place to deepen the narrative; they frequently situate their stories in a geographic context that will heighten the emotional impact of the story.  For more on the dramatic locations of Star Wars filming sites, see this article by National Geographic

 

Tags: geologybiogeography, religionChristianityplaceIreland, tourism.

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J. Mark Schwanz's curator insight, January 4, 2016 10:33 AM

Skellig Michael is sure to become a more common geographical interest since the success of Star Wars. 

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Traveling Teaches Students in a Way Schools Can't

Traveling Teaches Students in a Way Schools Can't | Geography Education | Scoop.it
American education is largely limited to lessons about the West.


When I turned 15, my parents sent me alone on a one-month trip to Ecuador, the country where my father was born. This was tradition in our family—for my parents to send their first-generation American kids to the country of their heritage, where we would meet our extended family, immerse ourselves in a different culture, and learn some lessons on gratefulness.

My family’s plan worked. That month in Ecuador did more for my character, education, and sense of identity than any other experience in my early life.


Tags: place, tourism, education, geo-inspiration.

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Tony Hall's curator insight, December 3, 2015 11:59 PM

This is a great article. I think it applies to people who live in all developed countries (not just the USA), as well as the privileged people from the less developed places. It touches on a lot of things I care about - seeing, feeling, smelling how other people live. Learning that we are not all the same. Knowing that it is ok to not engage with the "American/Australian/Western Dream". Knowing that it is ok to have your own dreams that are different to other people. 

Tina Little-Coltrane's curator insight, December 4, 2015 9:37 AM

An Absolute #TRUTH !!

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 16, 2015 7:15 PM

Being able to travel is a great gift. There is nothing more rewarding than seeing new places and learning about cultures. Unfortunately, the last time that I could afford to travel far from home was when I was young and I didn't understand the amazing opportunity that I had at the time. I traveled to Aruba, and to New Brunswick, Canada. Both amazing places. If I could go anywhere, I'd go to Germany, London, and Ireland as soon as possible. My great grandmother was from England, and my great grandfather was from Canada, I'd like to visit their home towns. Traveling places would definitely be a better learning experience than leaning about a place in school. You get to experience the real thing. Interact with the locals and maybe even get involved with the local traditions. Traveling to learn is definitely an experience worth wild.

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Practicing an Open Mind

Practicing an Open Mind | Geography Education | Scoop.it

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one’s lifetime.”


Tags: place, tourism, geo-inspiration.

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Greg Hill's curator insight, September 28, 2015 12:06 PM
I love to travel for it challenges what I already know or "think" I know.
Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 30, 2015 7:16 AM

Travel

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Fuzzy Borders

TagsCanadalanguage, social media, images, placeculture, landscape, tourism

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